Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska on October 7, 1995 · 12
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Lincoln Journal Star from Lincoln, Nebraska · 12

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Lincoln, Nebraska
Issue Date:
Saturday, October 7, 1995
Page:
12
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4B Lincoln Journal Star Saturday. October 7. 1995 CITYSTATE Page design: Mike Larsen Injured news carrier could affect all papers ASSOCIATED PRESS A newspaper attorney told the state Supreme Court Friday that its decision in the case of a girl who was struck by a car while delivering newspapers could affect every newspaper in Nebraska. An attorney for Jennifer Larson told the court there is sufficient evidence to prove the girl was an employee of the Fremont Tribune when she was struck by a -car and paralyzed in Cedar Bluffs. ; Tribune attorney Joe Grant ar- giied: "An employment relationship cannot exist without meaningful L communication." Without that com- munication, he said, the worker is an ; independent contractor. ' The newspaper is appealing a Nebraska Appeals Court ruling that Larson was an employee of the Fre-mont Tribune and is entitled to workers' compensation benefits. The Tribune says newspaper car- ' riers are independent contractors. Larson was 12 when she was struck by a car while delivering the paper near Cedar Bluffs in Feb- . ruary 1991 as a substitute for regular carrier Valerie Brauner. Larson re- mains in a permanent vegetative state. t "She is at home with her family now," said her attorney Robert T. ; Cannella of Omaha. "Her medical bills are now more than $1.6 million. ' Her parents are plant production workers." A judge of the Workers' Compensation Court initially ruled that Larson was an employee of the newspaper, but a review panel reversed that order. Her parents took the case to the Appeals Court, which ruled in January against the paper. Newspapers have argued that requiring workers' compensation in surance for newspaper carriers would be cost prohibitive. Cannella argued that Valerie believed she was an employee of the newspaper and not an independent contractor. "We cannot know the totality of the conversation between these children when Jenny was recruited, because Jenny cannot speak and Valerie cannot remember all of the details," Cannella said in a written brief to the Supreme Court. ' "But we do know that Valerie believed that she was an employee of the Tribune and not an independent contractor," he wrote. The newspaper has argued that its written carrier agreement with Brauner is conclusive that she was an independent contractor. Former state Sen. Tim Hall of Omaha tried several times, unsuccessfully, to get his colleagues to pass a bill to extend workers' compensation protection to newspaper carriers. The Legislature's Business and Labor Committee earlier this year killed Hall's latest attempt (LB221). Hall said if newspaper carriers can't be covered by workers' compensation, they should have the opportunity to buy other insurance. Industry officials have argued that newspapers probably would go to larger routes handled by adults if such a law were passed, meaning an end to newspaper routes for young people because it would be too expensive to insure them. The Nebraska Supreme Court has said there is no single test to determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor so the determination must, be made from all facts in each case. Cutshall pleads guilty to sexual assault MADISON (AP) - Roger Cut-shall has pleaded guilty in Madison County District Court to sexual assault of a teen-ager. Cutshall, 41, is to be sentenced next month by Judge Robert Ensz. No more specific court date was given. His daughter, Jill, was abducted jn Norfolk eight years ago, and she has not been seen since. She was 9 years old. David Phelps of Norfolk is serving a life sentence for kidnapping her. Roger Cutshall was charged with sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl in May 1992. He entered his plea Thursday and was freed on bond. He could face five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Witek wants on all-male commission Sen. Kate Witek of Omaha has a suggestion to deal with criticism that the Nebraska Constitutional Revision Commission is "too white and too male." The suggestion: appoint her. "Not .only can I give a woman's but I can also give a much needed perspective," Witek wrote to WITEK 'perspective' Sen. Floyd Vrtiska of Table Rock, chairman of the Legislature's Executive Board. Sen. Ron Withem of Papilli-on, who chaired the commission's first meeting last week, said two other senators, whom he did not name, had volunteered as well. The initial 12 members are all white males. Rock opera has Broadway flair BY L KENT WOLGAMOTT Lincoln Journal Star "The Who's Tommy" is part rock 'n' roll, part opera and lots of Broadway as it delivers two hours of impressive, eye-catching, ear-pleasing entertainment. Opening a three-day run at a nearly full Lied Center for Performing Arts Friday night, the "Tommy" touring company turned Pete Townsend's 1969 "rock opera" into a big Broadway show, with innovative staging, dramatic choreography and strong performances. The opera part of the equation comes because there is minimal dialogue in this two-act musical about a little boy who watches his father shoot his mother's boyfriend and withdraws into himself, becoming "deaf, dumb and blind." But Tommy, nonetheless, becomes a pinball wizard, then a miracle cure turns him into an even bigger star. That story line is perfect for Broadway treatment and it gets it via staging that is minimal but effective and often unexpected. Musically, the rock of the 1969 original album loses its high volume, guitar-powered edge. But the songs make the transition to show tunes well enough as an eight-piece orchestra seated on a platform high above the stage saturates the air with keyboards. More notably, Roger Daltrey's wail is replaced by trained voices On st?ge What "The Who's Tommy Where: Lied Center for Performing Arts, 301 N. 12th St. When: Today at 2, 8 p.m., Sunday, 2 p.m. Tickets: $34, $30, $26. Call 472-4747 for reservations. that for all their note-hitting quality lack rock's biting intensity and emotion. In a popular sense. "Tommy" peaks at the end of the first act as Tommy's father takes him to an alley where he arranges for the withdrawn boy to spend the night with The Gypsy. Her number is, of course, "Acid Queen," and here the stage version takes it cue from the 1975 Ken Russell film in which Tina Turner stole the show playing that part. Tracey Lee, the only black woman in the company, pulls the same trick, delivering scorching R&B vocals to create the show's rawest and most memorable song. That number is followed by the showstopper "Pinball Wizard." The best known tune from the original, "Pinball Wizard" is the production's biggest number, full of lights and dancing by the terrifically costumed company. With Teddy Boy coats in that number, a black-and-white-striped Mod ensemble when the healed Tommy meets the press and the hippie garb of the closing numbers, "Tommy" also does the Broadway number on 50s and '60s fashion with style and a touch of humor. The central story of "Tommy" is pretty simple. But Townsend's light entertainment does have a little depth mixed in with the silly fantasy. " The piece has always had an anti-religious spin a point driven home in the second act as rock star Tom-, my wears a messianic mirror-covered robe before he's stripped of that garment by his followers. "Tommy" has always dealt with child abuse as well, from the emotional neglect of his parents, the sexual molestation by Uncle Ernie in "Fiddle About" and physical torture from the mean Cousin Kevin. The latter role is played by Peter Connelly, the most striking perform; er of the night. But the show has to be carried by Tommy, and 18-year-old Michael Seelbach is more than up to the task, presenting an aura of sweetness through his character's ups and downs while proving to be a very strong singer. Tl Sure you can count on him once a year, but wouldn't you rather rely on something every day? Only Certified Transmission uses factory certified equipment to test your transmission before and after repairs so you can rely on it for a long time. Get your transmission rebuilt by us. It's a gift that keeps on giving. Stop in for a free estimate and diagnpstic check. Lincoln 1 801 Cornhusker Hwy (402) 474-1188 VWOHKV : s imi BUY ONE DINNER, GET ONE FREE! As a holder of the Table for Two Dining Card, you will discover the pleasure of fine dining in relaxed surroundings. Use your Table for Two Dining Card one or two times and it will more than pay for itself! We are confident you will enjoy new dining experiences and will return to the fine restaurants featured on the Table for Two Dining Card. ENvJHMr JAR... ...when you purchase a Dining Card frl BlllVS l l'.ll V..HHll 1 1 1 m i a i siawiwh-i-sv i.ri .'ill S 'ill This 1 6 oz. jar is good for any occasion. Use as a storage jar for candy or office supplies, as a coin jar or as a drinking glass for your favorite beverage. It easily holds a 12 oz. beverage with lots of room for ice. One jar per Dining Card: limit 2 jars per customer. While quantities last. Jars will be available lor pickup upon receipt of the Dining Card. $20 Membership For Free Dinners at 20 Restaurants. Dining Card Good Until August 31, 1996. it Great Gift Idea! it Purchase Additional Cards for Your Friends & Family! For card review, cost and purchase locations, or for restaurant restrictions call (402) 473-7137. To purchase using either a MasterCard or VISA, call (402) 473-7265. M..H.TH'I il l MM'tt.lH ! :mi()St SI SM'VWtM'SX 1I.11D1 I "II HSI M'l-U'IHH II I NOLLS Hfcsl ALKANT I 7eaJea Ill Mi Suds & Salads rii,Hi.ii ,iii i..t,tn..i. S(WAWH'I'S. il.nDi IOS Sl'M'T'H'TH'S iDl "iWli.V U.uii. V VW.VWH'I.SX ll ilDl UMVilbwIk SI VW-tt'TH Il.nDi '4 h X4I A; O Si Si Wtt-TH 'UDi ':miiit v IMOC.iinluitkri Hi V MAZATLAN ''"SMl1 4 MEXICAN l r i 4'i-T H..Ui.rf M-l-U ili KkSUMANT :n 7miisi St..l.WtM-S V il 11D1 "UiiV.II.ilvDi Sl..MH 1D1 i.T,i.HinlH,-il MimS 4K1I1S1 Irtl'lH 1U1 I'.siOSi SI VMrtWH'MSA 1D1 GRILLE K.mi.nl.1 IIj.i Hnkl. Ml "III Sl..T..rtW'S 1I11D1 Card Holder Rules 1 . Present your Dinini: Card u hen ordering a main entree and reteie nne main entree t equal or lesver alue KREE. mil In eumi tun liuiiimhins ci h o rvuuttuml. Otter dues not include heveraees. appetizers. desserK other a la carte menu items, or tax. Otter not good on take out orders. ()it i uoittt onv tinw til an il icHtiiintnl. 2. The Dining Card is not valid on holidays, includinc Thanksgiting. Christmas Eie. Christmas Day. Ne Year's Eve. Valentine s Day. Patrick's Day. Easter. Mother's Day. Memorial Day. Kather's Day. Labor Day. and local graduation dates. i. The Dining Card is not valid iih other special oilers or coupons. J. Any indiv idual restriction noted tor a participating restaurant is listed on rev erse side ot the card. 5. Suggested tipping should equal 151 to 20"r ot total billed heron discount. ft. Your Dining Cardespires Aug. 31. IWi, We are not responsible tor lost or stolen cards. No reiiinds or replacements vv ill be given. OMptii (Schlotzsky's) liiHi'tnSiiitjte I Ml) A O Si GiHHl .It .ill li'l.lllUfi Si WWTH4S4 tDi Dining Card Enrollment Form Dining Card Good Until August 31, 1996. Name . - Address "'V;,,''I;;,''V":;;;;'''':' r' ' City- Make check or money order payable to the Lincoln Journal Star. Mail along with this coupon to Dining Card. Lincoln Journal Star. 926 P St.. Lincoln. NE 68508. Purchase price of Dining Card is non-refundable. Please send- . card(s) State- Zip. I Phone I Amount Enclosed $. Please Charge my VIS AMasterCard account I 1 $20 Membership For Free Dinners at 20 Restaurants FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Card . Office Q Mail j Date onlb. UUJ Please allow 14 days for delivery of Dining Card. Use the form above to order as many cards as you like! Dining Cards Are Also Available at the Front Desk of the Journal Star Limitations Code i rl Ait uMh fillip if '-s; t:v. ' 4 , ( ( !"u , '"" - Jf . ''" SUMTW.TH'F'SA Days Card is Valid (L)-Lunch (D)- Dinner The Haymarket Grille Ramada Plaza Hotel, 141 N. 9th

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