The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 11, 1933 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, September 11, 1933
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Page 3
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1988 BLYTHEVILLE. . (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE THREE Recovery In U. S. Benefits Canada the >' s i I Mimulalion of American Business Has Already j Helped Our Neighbor, i HV OH.RKHT DRAPER i Written for SEA Service MON'IRKAL.— The Dominion '(inch's tO.OOO.OCfl people | .'.iiiiliiiiK jlmou 10 a man '.!!<-eii NltA cxpCTi'liucne Ihitl ,rniHorinli>|! ihcir sdulhcin n ;.<ji: v;9lrliiut; closely. b-cau.'.e.' I'lli-cis in Canada nie already liu- hm it-it anil may be full tucre-as- -i-iy as lift program unfolds. Canadians arc already payiiri! ::••)»>!• uricix fur many cuminexli- I'IPS. cual, gasoline, milk, bread. j Canadian business lias iiliraely ill die stimulation of Inlying I cross the border, of foodstuffs! .ectrlcal energy. wt,uil, noadpulp, 1 /liiigles. nickel, usbi-sios. Ibih. raw . Ceilain labor troubles develop£ here are blarm'i' on the "new .leal'' lor labor in Die Stales. "! moiiL'tury uiualiou Ui-comi's viri of the r.ro;!r:tin, Ccmac!a miglu ,i' lorced lo follow suit because ot .ter close business relations. ; Bui Canada, following Hie '«A's progress wiih ausortxd In- eresl, is far itoni convinced thai I is an example to bo 'followed. '•'he titling is very general h< ihat "conditions in .Canada arr- HfTerent." ! Tbis "watchful waiting' 1 alli- j:ide is well expressed by Hon. H ,1. Stevens, minister of trade and commerce, whin lie said. "Let us ratch the big movemenl tliat is I i.oing on in ihc United Slates •:ith sympathy and interest, b'jl io not let us bs stampeded hilo .ping what they are doing-. 1 Reforms Alnvuly Made i For one thing, Canadians feel :bai many ol ine reforms whi<A Otiiev Miners Flee Three Miles Tlm>m>li .Tunnels lo Ri-iU'h Safctv. boi- o( years was with Oio Vanglmn Quartet, Ls In cliiugi! o[ tilt' choir, iu;d Ills solew me Mug onjuyi'd nl OIU'll .snVlCl'. TIlC.SC' IlKYllllRS Will continue 1 lluniiuli Hie week ent'li evening. 1:3u o'clock. Out of Town People Coming for Concert I - ; THIS CURIOUS WORLD - A number ol out ot town pie arc phnmm,! to attend lli« con- con nl UK- Pus! HapllM churc.i tonight, 8 o'clock, when the mill: 1 ., , l>n - Pl 'Vl- " muirlot of tin- TCXLIS Stale college; (UI J ) - l-.ichi minds were killed : 0 ( Sun Mnic-us. Tex., will pieselil, today when ™al rust ignlle'd In , t program I ll.e Oakni..ii. m!,,c of ihe Hlllman,' Tlu , p^,,,,, ;F; s , xm ., orc ,| by ,iie Cr.nl and '. , w c.mipany al Mmk-1 niythovllli. MmlM.-ilal As«. Tiierc will be no i'h:ui;e bul a free inij SlalScm. More than a fcote «f oilior min e-is (li'it ilnvi' mllvs tlmmuh the thail lo !!;,• Mtrt.icr mid rsrupi'il wht'ii thi' bu-.M l,-i i;,, fhorily ttf- ler the (\.i\' f woik bngiiii. T'our bellies iiii-ic brought lo tin- .'•tirfiico \\iilifn a few hours niter lht> c.xpl»^ii.n which occurred at u puinl win IT tiu- Oakmont inlni' npprnachi-; il:e- Ni-w Field mine, "petielrathw tin- wound from nn- ulher nni-li'. Threo in i!ir drul were Idcntllli'il us NOke HMkui. :IS. Chnrli-s Solo- •ition. ^1. ul Ni'w KmsliiKlon, mill J«Mi-t>h Ki.nu'c.itl. M. Mrs Clara Lee Dixon Dies at Home Near Dell Mrs. Cl.ira Ur nixnn, al. wife of B. Z. IJiMiti, MicninilK'et S:itur- day at llif family liome neur-Dcll. will ofTcrhiH will be taken which Is (jlvi'ii the' iiiiiirict inemlx'rs whu lire working tlu-lr way tliroilali Methodists Organize Church at Half Moon The' rMiiiKC'llsllc meet ing In pro- Bn^s al Hull Moon for several weeks closed last niighl following li'.e oryanl/aiUin of it Methodist church thi'ic. The Hev. I 1 , C). Uo- ili'V pastor ui the I'iivl church lit-te 1 , wits In diai'tie- of ii.ei revival hi I which 11 Julntd Ihe MKIiodlsl and 58 Die llantlsl church. , The He7. Mi 1 . Koile will preach nl Half Moon twice monthly until conference metis in NovemlK-r. ay at llif fainlh 1 liome nenr-Dell. I ni •! i i i • Funeral -frvict-s were lielel Sim- Philadelphia Riuinpss DUSinCSS Falls, Quebec, .shown der. . . - I'xclutiinO •best customers and neighbors." Ihe United States and Canada, is ulso Canadian industrial plants like the power plant and .pulp mill al ShawiniBan above ... are already feeling an impetus from NRA_activities ac ross the border, of products between those two increasing. uiih sn^SOOD in July, and one not lil with Canadian erfcd of'lhu NRA becomes evident. | !»«'«• Meanwhile, Ihey The other side of the shield .-.-as briBliier. too. Amcricf.p man- .lie NRA is bringing to the .States are old slull in the l)o- : :iiiiion. Back before the World .Var, steps were taken in Canada |0 insure against the appalling .Miking debacle which swept the | -Jntod Stales last March. Two and a half years ago Can- \vatch and ufacturers were able also lo sell -iiore lo Canada. Imports of fibers, textiles and their products increased from S1,455,COO a year to $?..- 2fl3,OfiO. There was a slight bill elcfinilo increase in American x sales to Canada of manufactures of iron from S3.12i>,OoO to S3.858.MO. Automobiles and parts were shipped acitss Hie line in greater mian- .uo's basic industry, wheat, was tabilized at yreat ex|K'nse io the | -ovtrnmene. As Stevens puts it. the Uniteo .tatts is hoping to develop -ankiiiK system somewhat simi- |ir to what Canada already has; _ |nel that as regards agriculture,juadian Canadian government "did in I A.ssocialion told the writer that -<-imection with our great wheat] the dress cutters' strike recently .re try-'called in Montreal wns blamed on - American, policies, and said the lity. and there was an increase of idling .mill products. The labor and wage policies of the NRA have also hail their effects. Indirectly, but not less effectively. A director of Ihe Ca"-- Manufacturers' Protective y over ^ iustry jeisl what they art to. organise • themselves [ .here to • do."* But Ottawa is walchful. Cabnet, ministers and senior government officials are watching the vents below the border with •j!tne;t imercEl. for the Dominion nay soon have to decide on an runomic relief program lo cotin- wacl the clfects oi. the NHA on Canadian business. Canada's new political parly, the ;o-operalue Cunimoimeallh Fed- ration, which originated in the e-en, and claims to be fashioned ;omj the lines of the British La- -eir parly, regards the NRA movc- nent in ihe United States as a .in sl?p in the right direction jid would be likely so to regard similar movement In Canada. Bul this socialistically-inelineel Jhird party" believes it will fail | :i the ions; run "because it relies 'n the profit motive.' ' A Montreal CCF leader declares -The NRA will crash on the de- ire of the capitalists to make -nge profits. They will not fol- | :,«• through with Roosevelt. They II boost prices to impossible lev- aiid bring failure to the whole lojccl." NHA Iii:nsls Trade But already clfccts of the NRA re plainly to be seen in Canada. | t has .very definitely stimulated 'anadian business. The increased I nyiny in the States has rellectcd .self in purchases of Canadian I Torts. sales to her southern f-Shlor were -13 per cent higher ^Ji.ly than in July. 1932. larger than at any period sines l/cceinbcr, 1931. ! Canada's exports lo the United [ 'tales reached their lowest point April. S3.3a2.WO. Compare this Germany Plans "Course" For Newsppaer BERLIN lUPj — Newspaper cdi- lors and contribulors who feel Ihey have not been sutliciCTUly Instructed in Nazi journalism during (he Relchwide "harmoni/a- i:on" of the press will have an e.r]X>rlunily in the fall. The German Journalism Tnsti- l:tle, operatini;—as always—under Ihe influence of the Propaganda Ministry, will ufler an intensive, len-day course in No\ ember v, hich will include not only press technique, but also the important cvjesliojis of political, cultural and community life." New Hampshire Night Life at Serious Stage CONCORD, N. H. iUI J l — New Hampshire's wild night life, as ic- portcd in a newspujwr dispatch from a rural correspondent: "Canaan — Health Officer F. Hetlchinson killed a skunk In his night shitl nl 2:30 a.m. lasl v.csk. He ireed a rillcgun." clay aft, in.x.ii , lt North Sawba cemetery «ith lie |{ev. w. J. I/.Roy. pastor of the L.tke Street Methodist ch'trch, oindalins. The PHILADELPHIA. lUi'J - Since Cnbb UndcTtiikliiB company was In . llu ' n<lu ' nt °' lj ™'. Ihe prel/cl- charge 0 ! fiiiu-ral iii'riini;e"-iiienls Iwlsllng Irndr here has i-spcrlenc- The dcn-asHl is Hinvivi-d bv II.T ! ctl il decided- stimulus. htisband. tliti-,. daiiRhteis anil one I'hlladelphia nl out! time had 40 icr rim:l:cr. two sisu-rs and l )tel ' el bakeries, bill when the demand lor hard pretzels dropped oil as beer became illegal, many of Ihe plants closed up. Now. however, liicy are bej!lnnliiK lo reo|icn, some ol them working three shltls a day. Many mel/cl twlslcrs are from IN THE SAMARA DESERT, AU OF THE INHABITANTS UVE UNOFfi. THE CUPlOOS VlttAGF- C TUNMEIS WAS SO CONSTRUCTED AS A DEl-ENSE ASAINST ROVING 6ANCTTS/ SUN PAYS ABE NOT HEAT/ THEY ARE A FORM Oi= ENERGY CALLED QENEPONCK, FRENCH WAR ACE, DOWN S'/V ENB/ViV PIANES IN OHE AFTE/i/'JOOM, WITH •ONLY Firry-stx &uLt.srs FtfiED? 9-U I hi' of Mnllnalle bi liummi i«i]HilM!i)n llv villain- witliotit it li L- lu-tow Ihr ytirfai't. 1 .son. l\vo bro'.Jic :.*.. scheme was unseltling Canadian labor with false hopes of higher wages and shorter hours. Newsprint Cnde Causes Slir The code for the newsprint industry originally had a provision that would have caused reverberations in Canada. H provided thai the president could impose a duty Of limitation on imports ihat tended to nullify the aims of the code. That would have meant thai Canadian manufacturers in this vita) industry would have had to adlreru closely to tiie provisions of the U. S. code if they were to market Iheir product in the United Stairs, as most of them do Modification of this cotle is believed to make this less imminent. Wedding Sfcret Seven Years WOODSTOWN, N'. J. IU1 J ) Seven years agD Etliel M. Frank- Rev. J. E. Caar Speaks at Nazarene Services UsiiiK ns his subject "Jesu.s Ihe Divine S',:i-cl:ilLsl." Ihe Rev. .1. K. Oaaf piiiiehe-d lo a large audience at tin- rlmrch of the Nazarene Sunilay evtnlni; where he Is leading [lit revival .services. He £}>oke of Chm'. as a divine specialist bccmrM' t;f llis ability to do (hat which He 1 came lo ilG: "Ho caini' (o seek and lo save thai whU'h was losl," and dellghis in the "linril cn.scs," he said. Then he emplui-slvrd the fact of wiUmgno.'. atul readiness lo ;«!•. Not (inly 'of tlio earin,. bul thi! slit'tp. gonl-t anil cnmels, also. At it dlsliiucc' of a fi'w hundred ytinls, the village ritnnrjl l:c rccn. whlrh. of conrfc, was 'tin.' i-itil idea In its Ijeln^ buill In filch a ciiiiini;; minmu'. Ni:X'l: HIP clc'plutnh \\-\\\\ il; No rxtiliuinlloii as i.o Low it not | ., ., -, t ... ,,, t „...u llii're wits uviillabli\ Tin- llsh, put II) (o ^4, althougli there are hi a bnwl, seemud trlnhlemi'd and | youths and old men engaged al the trade, A worker of average speed can twist 35 prctY.els a minute, i though Mrs. Elmer Hatellng of Lancaster County, claims a record of 90 pretzels In 55 seconds. ' Hluc Sunshlnt: T'licnumciion KUOENE. Ore. (UP)'—Hlue sunlight shone down on Eugene. 1 n-- cenlly when 300.0(10 acres ot heavy limberland tiivstale wns destroyed His by foresl fire.*. University of Ore- do B°n professors declared the rare darlcel about, showiiiK it !uul In wild stale .some (hue. •Mi. Aiielt'r Gets K.'.-l.l). V'lsli ty" riullrn. 'rilluiiiook rlti?e-n who weighs 05 pounds, hml a thrill while ll.slilns reu'enlly wla-n a IniK'-' sknte st'i/ed his honk. For over an hour he fulfill the fish Ix-fcin; i..: laiulul It on Ihe Jelly. U wu'^hud fifi pound.s. MAN'S HEART STOPPED, STOMACH GAS CAUSE W, L. Adams was bloated .10 with gns thai his heart olien missed j was Hit rhLss from Gosr.ell who I bents after ealhitj. Adlcrlka rid him icndered tevcral choir numbers led REDMOND. Ore. (OP)—A hltjh- of all gas. and now he cats any- liu marritd William C. Vincent, of j f or | 13 tiutt which others wcic not phenomenon wns caused by refrac- S-'we;lE£boro. They kepi i::e wed- < able lo (to. It Ion of the sun's r.iys through a ding a secret, until they had stnll-] A special feature of Ihe services dense smoke foj< in the upper air. cient funds lo build a home. And now, with tlieir home in Swccies- boro nearly finistad. Mrs. Vin-1 by Professor Aimer, who Is teach-! ly ; colored gold Ksh six Inc'ncs longltliinv and feels fine. Sold In Bly- ccnl's motlirr announced t:.e mar-1 Ing a music school at this lime. | wns found In an Irrigation ditch: thcvlllc by City Drug Store. rlage'. , Htlmnn liarnard, who for a-neini- near here by Mrs. C. A. Ordtvay.' —Adv. J-5 Soldier of Fortune's Revolver Cound NEW ORLEANS (Ul>)—A pisto! believed lo have teen the pro]>crly of William Walker. American soldier of fortune who made himself President of Nicaragua in 1850, was found by Gregory Mason, archaeologist of Che University of Pennsylvania, while filming old Maya scenes in Spanish Honduras. Mason, who passed through New Orleans en route to his home, stated the pistol will be given to the Metropolitan Mussum of Art. in New York, where a world-famous collection of arms and armor but it shows how a code in an out- cide country may easily affect Canadian industry. In British Columbia, shingle nanufacturers recently met at v"anccuver and agreed, to operate under conditions of wages and lours identical with those imposed n those of the United Slates un- Icr the NRA code. A s British Columbia shingles enter the U. S. Inly-free, the Canadian compan- es have put themselves on a party with U. S. mills operating un- ler the NRA. Most Canadian leaders appear :o feel dial though there may be fosiie gcod features in. the NRA, ;lan which might later be incor- j wrated in the Canadian business system, the "ballyhoo" and high- [ pressure methods needed would Is housed. Walker was executed in Trujillo. Spanisii Honduras, in 18CO, after an exciting career. Change of Life No medicine can prevent Uie change of life, but CARDUI has helped thousands of women to overcome much suffering at that time. Purely vegetable, harmless. Ask the druggist for CARDUI. To Insure Your Cotton Call W Caudill's Agency GENERAL INSURANCE 106 North Broadway Rundown in Health Meant Rundown in Blood Blood is life. Blood is everything Vheti blcod gets thin or poor you .•el it in a do«'n dtlferent ways, ppetile fails, strength ebbs and on become weak and depressed. To build up your blood, tr.ke iiove's Tasteless Chill Tonic. II Diitnlnsf iron which makes for .ch, red blcod. It also contains isteless quinine which lends lo urlfy the blood. Thus you get two Seels ot grcal value In any run- own condilion. Taken regularly | )r a few day;;. Grove's Tasteless hill Tonic will ™on have you • ck on your feet. It will improve nir adpclitc, increase your streng- i and vitality and pul color in jur cheeks .For halt a century, rove's Tasteless Chill Tonic has ':en a sou'rce of strength and :ergy tor young and old. II is ?asant to take and contains .i'i.ing harmful. C3et a bottle to- 'iy and enjoy real health. Sold Vail stores. —Adv. 8 Bennett's milk Li rale — it's properly pasteurized. At The Home Of The Mayo Clinic (Rochester. Minn.) the health officer. Dr, D. C. Lockhead, recently said in a statement through the press, "We in me health department are concerned aboul milk from two angles. Bccau?e il is the best food obtainable, \ve want to see it consumed In great quantities, and because of Hie possibility of its spreading disease, we' want lo know that our local supply is produced under all the refinements of production commercially |»ssl- ble and that it be pasteurijrd so thil we can ftimantec it safe." Telephone No. 7t Bennett's Dairy . and I've ..CHESTERFIELDS am always ihe same. They have a pleasing lasto and aroma. I smoke Vni before breakfast and after dinner. I smoke 'cm when Tin T can toll . a lot of llicin working. I smoke 'em wlien I'm rest- And always llicy satisfy. They 'i& ci&a>re//e Ikatb MILDER t/ie dqaretfe t/iat TASTES BETTER t esterfield ft) 1JJJ. liMrrr i Mvtis Toncco Co.

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