The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 18, 1954 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, October 18, 1954
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1954 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE FIVE Key Campaign Trends Ex-Senator Making Strong Bid In Crucial Idaho Election By JACK B'ELL ~~ EDITOR'S NITE — This is another of- several stories by roving Associated Press reporter« analyzing the campaign In key states. BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Former Sen. Glen Taylor, repentant about what he calls past "political mistakes" and minus his cowboy trappings, is making a strong bid to upset Republican Sen. Henry Dworshak in Idaho's possibly crucial senatorial race. In 1948 when Taylor made his ill-fated excursion into the Progressive party, Idaho Republicans wrote the then Democratic senator off as any further threat to them and many conservative Democrats breathed a sigh of relief. Taylor blames his primary defeat in 1850 on his decision to rvin as the vice presidential nominee with Henry Wallace on the Progressive ticket. But now he is back as the Democratic party's senatorial nominee in a campaign in which most of the unbiased dopesters give him a chance to beat Dworshak. If Taylor goes to the senate, he might provide the vote by which the Democrats could organize that now closely divided body. If he wins, many politicians believe that Idaho voters also will replace Republican Gov. Len Jordan with a Democrat, Clark Hamilton. Idaho governors can't succeed themselves and Jordan did not choose to battle Dworshak for the Republican senatorial nomination. The Republicans picked State Atty. Gen. Robert E. Smylie as their candidate for governor. Taylor Making News The Idaho story today centers around Taylor, who is making most of the news with his campaigning, while slow-starting Re- Two Leftists Y/in in Bloody Jordan Voting AHHAN, Jordan (ft— Two leftists won parliamentary seats in Saturday's Woody balloting in Jordan. Their strength was attributed largely to anti-Western feeling among Palestine Arab refugees who blame the West for their expulsion from that part of Palestine that now Is Israel. Reports here said the violence accompanying Jordan's first elections under a new system permitting authorized groups to campaign as political parties, left eight persons dead and more than 44 wounded. In Damascus, Syrian press reports last night said 25 persons had been killed and 300 wounded during electoral clashes in Jordan. The reports said a night curfew and strict censorship had been imposed in Amman. One extreme leftist. Abdel Qader es Saleh, won his'seat in Nablus, 30 miles north of Jerusalem. He was supported by a pro-Communist national front but ran as an independent. Although referred to here as the "first Communist ever elected in Jordan," Saleh is not a legally designated Communist since the party is outlawed. The other leftist, Rashad Mas- wadch, won in Hebron. He also had the backing of the national front. With results in from half the 40 contests, progovernment independents had won 17 seats and the opposition had taken 3. 'publicans have continued to count heavily on Democratic defections to keep secure what they regard as a long edge for Dworshak. Taylor, who spent most of his time in California until he. decided to try a political comeback, has tossed aside the cowboy regalia he said he donned when he first entered state politics "because I was unknown and I had to get known some way." The guitar he once strummed somewhat less than musically has been passed along to Arod, his 19-year-old son. During the primary, in which he got more votes than either of two other candidates but not a majority of those cast, Taylor and Arod often gave the folks a song or two to pep them up for his talk. But is Is serious business now in the general election campaign with little time for singing. Taylor, in a smart business suit, gathers daytime crowds with a sound truck and gets cheers at night rallies with his attacks on the Eisenhower administration. Against Taylor's tactics, Dworshak has been standing on his record in the Senate, which he proudly says includes his presence at all 261 roll calls taken in that body in the 83rd Congress. Loose Rules Although he says he has "never talked about my opponent in any campaign," Dworshak transgresses this rule to contend that Taylor "never comes back to Idaho except to run for office" and to remind the voters that Taylor deserted his party in 1948. Dworshak has gone all out for President Eisenhower's flexible farm price support program in a state wheSSecretary of Agriculture Ezra Benson has a strong personal following, but where there is admitted dissatisfaction among dairymen and wheat growers who had been forced until recently to leave part of their land idle under Department of Agriculture rulings. The Republican senator is taking full advantage of Presidnet Eisenhower's appeal for a Republican Congress, although he says he doesn't always vote with the administration. 'If we can get out a fairly heavy vote. I am' confident we can win," he said. Taylor admits cheerfully that his decision to run with Wallace was 'a bad political mistake that cost me my seat in the Senate." "But my objective was to try to give the country a warning about supporting a policy of backing colonialism," he said. "I said that policy would be disastrous and there is no better word to describe our situation today as a result of continuing to follow that policy." Philippines Bans Film MANILA Hfi— The Philippine army has banned showing of the Hollywood film "Viva Zapata," starring Marlon Brando, in Cebu City and other provincial towns on grounds it tends to endanger the security of the state. The film, which was shown in Manila recently after an earlier ban, deals with the life of a Mexican revolutionary general. Merkouris Loses Extradition Fight; Returned to LA LOS ANGELES Ifl—James Mer- qouris is in jail today awaiting arraignment on charges of murdering his former wife and her second husband, Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Forbes. Merkouris. 40, Was brought here from Arkansas yesterday. He lost a fight against extradition following his arrest by FBI agents in Hot Springs. He denies knowledge of the double slaying in which Mr. and Mrs Forbes were shot to death in their ceramics shop Sept. 20. Police say Merkouris has been identified tentatively from pictures as the man seen leaving the ceramics shop about the time of the slnyings. Parolees Lose Doctors DBS MOINES I/Pi—A parolee is not eligible for medical treatment at a penal institution hospital says an Iowa attorney general's ruling. If the parole is revoked, the person involved then would become eligible for hospital aid, the op ion added. The Riding Conleys King Brothers Circus In Town Tomorrow The huge King Brothers Circus rolls into Blytheville tomorrow for afternoon and evening performances following an old-time circus parade through the downtown area of the The mile-long troupe of animals, performers and clowns, will start the parade from the Fairgrounds exhibit area on Missouri Street at 11:30 a. m. Matinee performance will be at 2:30 and the final show at 8 p. m. Showing here under the auspices of the Blytheville Junior Chamber of Commerce, King Brothers Combined Circus is the second largest show in the world since its merger with Cole Bros. Circus. The huge show comes here .from Memphis where it is exhibiting today. 15 Elephants The many features of the show include 15 performing elephants, two-ton hippopotamus, 80 ponies and horses and many other attractions in addition to a big double sideshow with a congress of humar oddities from all parts of the world One of the many new features added to the show this year are the Biding Conleys, a family of nine brothers and sisters, their mothei and father, a bareback riding troupi from Europe making their firs tour of this country. The internationally famous eque- strains are known as the "aristocrats of the ring". Advance ticket sales are being conducted by the Jaycecs who will end their sales campaign tonight with a house-to-house canvass. Tickets also are on sale at Owens Drug Store and Kelley's Friendly Shoe Store. Utah GOP to Consider Political Fate of Man Who Confessed Hoax SALT LAKE CITY (API — Troubled Utah Republican party leaders meet in Salt Lake City tonight to consider the political fnte of a mini they had thought — only 48 hours before — to be a shoo-in for the 1st District congressional seat he now holds. LITTLI LIZ— Caruthersville News Regular communication of Caruthersville Chapter of the der of Demolay will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Masonic Temple. All Demolays are urged to attend, while all Master Masons are Invited. Caruthersville Junior Chamber of Commerce will hold Its regular meeting at 8:00 p.m. Tuesday at the club house. Richard Watkins. a freshman at Missouri School of Mines, Eolla, Mo., spent the weekend here visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow W. Watkins. Sonny Unice, attending Memphis State College, spent the weekend here visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Unice. Joe Anders, also enrolled at Memphis State, spent the weekend here visiting with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Anders. Mike Hayden, son of Mrs. Bill Hayden and the late Mr. Hayden of Caruthersville. has entered the United States Navy. Mike left early Tuesday morning for St. Louis where he under went his physical examination Wednesday. He will be s|a- tioned at Great Lakes, Mich., lor eleven weeks of basic training. The 1954 graduate of Caruthersville High School enlisted for a three year term and will be discharged on his twenty first birthday. Johnny Homer, of Cape Glrar- deau spent the first few days of last week here visiting with his brother Paul L. Homer. No sessions were held in the local public schools Thursday and Friday because most of the teachers attended a district teacher's meeting at Cape Qirardeau. Carl Hunter who for the past two years was Pemiscot assistant county agent, has accepted the position of Bollinger county agent. He and his family moved Monday of last week to Liitesvllle. His office will be at Marble Hill. Mrs. Bernie Lay returned Wednesday from St. Louis where she spent two days attending a meeting of the Grand Chapter, O. E.S. The meeting wns Hurriedly scheduled over the weekend after Douglas R. Stringfellow iR- Utah) Saturday night disclosed he was not, as he had claimed, in many quarters including the Congressional Record, the hero of a secret, behind-the-lines mission into World War II Germany to capture a scientist. With tears running down his cheeks, (he 32-year-old disabled veteran had appeared on ft hastily arranged television program to say that his story of wartime cloak- nd - dagger heroism — recounted over n decade when I had made over 200 speeches in a single year" — was bogus. StriiiRfellow offered to withdraw from the congressional race but left the decision up to Utah's 1118- icmber Republican State Committee. State OOP Chairman O. J. .Wilkinson said that county and other GOP leaders had been instructed to come to the committee meeting with a sample of opinion in their home districts. He said reaction to Stringfellow's disclosure at state party h«ndquar- ters was "tremendous," and that a "large volume" of the telephone calls and telegrams indicated the callers would still vote for the congressman. Stringfellow made his electrify- .ng disclosure on the heels of a story published In the veterans edition of the Army Times, an unofficial Washington newspaper, which questioned the authenticity of his tale of wartime espionage. "Like many other persons suddenly thrust into the limelight I rather thrived on the adulation and new-found popularity," he said sadly, reading to the television camera from a prepared stats, ment. "I fell Into the trap which In part bud been laid by my own glib tongue." The congressman explained that he had invented his tale of heroism to help "carry my philosophy of the goodness of life to all those who might listen." In New Orleans, evangelist Billy Graham announced at a crusade sermon that he almost wept when he heard of Strlngfellow's confession. A woman In Houston. Tex. announced that a scheduled Stringfellow lecture there would be promptly canceled. Ralph Edwards, producer of the "This Is Your Life program that featured Strlngfellow's tale last January, said that "by the time we decided to do It the story had SARASOTA, FLORIDA Where Summer Spends the Winter Every day h a fun-filled day a* sunny Saraoto! Winter home of the Greatest Show on Earth — (tingling Brother! —• Bornum & Bailey Circus, Boston Red Sot spring training, (tingling Museum or Art, jungle gardens, sandy beaches and fabulous fishing. Yet, you will enjoy eventful, exciting Sarasota — day and nijhtf OPEN DECEMBER 1 The Sarasota T«rroc« h the fines* en Florida's famous West Coast — swimming pool, thuffleboard courts, excellent dining and cock- tori lounge. 'America* t'ld European plan. GuesH enjoy privileges •f Lido Beach, lobby Jones golf course, including free trantpofta- "Southern Hospitality" SARASOTA TERRACE, P. 0. Bo* 1720, Phone Hireling 2-0421, SAP.ASOTA, FLA. An Amcricon h o fellow who Isn't afraid to bawl out the president but Is always polite to police- nitted that he thought Stringfel ow's opponent. Walter K. Grnng- hnd little chance of beating [ie congressman. And yesterday, there were many vho were still inclined to believe — privately -r. that Slrlngfellosv could win anyway if left on the GOP ticket. A number of Repub- ican leaders Indicated they felt his to be the case, but said they vere still doubtful as to which wa.\ hey would decide on the question of allowing him to run. Sen. Wallace F. Beimett (R- Utah) said he thought strtngfellow •still is a disabled veteran who has established a more or less wrmal life through a display of ,-reat courage and hard work . . [ have not lost my faith in him." Sen. Arthur V. Watkins, the Utah Republican who headed the McCarthy censure committee am who was with Stringfellow when ie made his public statement Saturday, said, "It takes a big man to do this." Democrats were silent yesterday and efforts to locate opponent Granger were fruitless. The only comment came Saturday from Democratic State Chairman Milton L. Weilenmann, Who expressed sympathy for StrlngfeUow but added, "I don't think that the man should repent by asking to be elected to Congress." Strlngfellow's story had brought him national renown and had placed him much In demand as an inspiration speaker. 81 Million Cars Expected by 1965 DETROIT tfi — Think the highways are crowded today? A report prepared for the American Automobile Assn. meeting here noted government estimates that 81 million motor vehicles will be on the nation's roads by 1956. To emphasize the need for more and better highways, AAA officials got up a couple of statistics: If placed bumper-to-bumpor. 81 million cars would stretch 10 times round the earth at the equator. Or, In a straight line, they would reach to the moon. If piled on top of each other pancake-style, the 81 million cars would make a heap 65,000 miles high. Setter 'O/c Needed OKLAHOMA CITY (/P)—The City Council was fill set in provide a disaster warning system for civil defense when someone spoke up: "Where would the people go if they were warned?" Reminded there are no air raid shelters, city fathers tabled the project for further planning. Actress, TV Singer Married in California HOLLYWOOD iff)— Actress Ruth Hampton 20 and television singer Byron Palmer were married yesterday at the home of the bridegroom'! parents Mr. and Mrs. Harlem Qv Palmer. The bride was Miss New Jersey in the 1052 Miss Universe beautj contest. Superior Judge William Palmer,, the bridegroom's uncle, performs* the rites. Palmer's father it publisher •( the Hollywood Citizen-News. Doctors Often Prescribe This One Active Ingredient TO RELIEVE PAIN OF RHEUMATISM Fast-acting C-2223 contain! lodium «•!• icylatc to speed welcome comfort. Thousands use it when rheumatic, arthritic or muscle pain "acts up" I Price of fir«t bottle back if not utit&ed. Get C-2223; been printed and reprinted SO times it was unlmpeach- muny able." An independent motion picture producer announced that he had obtained movie rights to the bogus .story only this week. Stringfcllow, married ami the father of two small boys, wears braces on his legs us the aftermath of a mine explosion in France during the last war, Only last week, a top state Democratic official had privately ad- HERE'S EXTRA RELIEF CO ^•^^ *" ^0T *l MISERIES ATTACKS ALL COLD $YMPTOM$ AT ONE T/Mf. . . IN ifSS TIMtt Wo ordinary pain-reliever can mnke thia claim ... but 666 cnn. The 666 forrnuln contains a combination of prescription-type ingredients not found in any other cold medicine. For that "er/ra" relief, try 666 liquid or tablets, Rcmemter . . . 666 does more because it has more. 666 LIQUID OR TABLETS ttt DOB MOKE IKAUSt II HAS MOIE Wells And Pumps For Farm Crop Irrigation Equipped to drill any Size Well "You can't irrigate without water." ARKANSAS WELL COMPANY PO-3-41U HI * Main 5-YEAR GUARANTEE ALL PURPOSE ATTACHMENT to ZIG-ZAG BUTTONHOLE DARN ft MEND MONARCH 5IWNG CENTtRS, INC. D.pl. MO-15 55 North 3rd Street, Memphis, Tennessee | VMT fMMrfitiMMd Siflitr Mwinf machine. BARGAINS IN NEW OLIVER FARM EQUIPMENT! (2) DiSC HARROWS—Twenty 20" blades, cut out blades on front, 1199 pounds, 6' swath. EACH $275 DISC HARROW— Twenty 18" blades, 765 pounds, 5' swath. $175 (2) HEAVY DUTY OLIVER PLOWS— 3-14" breaking plows. EACH £345 FARMERS IMPLEMENT CO. 900 N. 6th Phon* 3-8166 You're Missin Somet ling ... If You Haven't Tried Hudson's Exclusive Cleaning Formula STAYBRIGHT The new cleaning discovery that actually restores the original new lustrous color to your clothes! It costs no more for that peace of mind to know it has to be cleaned right at Hudson's. • Evening Dresses, Knit Dresses Blocked • Draperies • Hats • Seat Covers Better Cleaning with the Hudson Finish in 8-Hours is Youn For the Asking! HUDSON Cleaner — Clothier — Tailor Phon* POplar 2-2612 in BlythtvilU Phon* 97 in Steele, Missouri

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