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Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California • Page 144

Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California • Page 144

Publication:
Oakland Tribunei
Location:
Oakland, California
Issue Date:
Page:
144
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

2-M Oakland Tribune, Sunday, Sept. 1 1, 1960 By RAY HAYWOOD Letter From Home Naming Our City Streets By ALBERT E. NORMAN BOYD AVENUE from Cavour to Forest Streets, just west of College Avenue, was named for Percy Boyd, real estate promoter and financier, known to most real estate men as Bill Boyd. He furnished the land and the money to many builders in the Claremont Palms Tract through which this Boyd Avenue runs. ABBOTT WAY in the Maxwelton Tract, off Moraga Avenue, was named for.

Granville Abbott of Crocker Avenue, Piedmont, a close friend of Nellie Maxwell Osborne, operator of the Maxwelton Dairy on this property, and later the subdivider of this same property. BARBARA ROAD, off MacArthur Boulevard, three blocks east of Lakeshore, was named for Barbara Gordon, wife of Henry Gordon, manager of a Tribune branch office on San Pablo Avenue, just above 14th Street. Mrs. Gordon was for years the cashier on the ground floor of The Tribune. tackle, dropped out to devote full time to his studies.

However, the Bears' first scrim, mage was a fast, spirited and interesting affair, featuring open football with emphasis on forward passing. National Forest reported nearly a score and Yosemite National Park two. Fire fighters, still recovering their strength after beating the Donner and Forestville fires, went back to the lines, watching the skies for help in the form of rain. Jack Green, once condemned for murder, was paroled from San Quentin Prison where he had spent 28 of his 58 years. Green was sentenced to hang for a Los Angeles theater holdup killing of a policeman.

He spent 30 months on Death Row before his sentence was commuted because a companion, long ago executed, did the shooting. During that time he received eight reprieves. "I had so many hearty last meals I don't even remember what I ate," he said. He goes to a clerical job in a Catholic parish. He was converted while in prison, where his record was perfect.

"It's like pulling a tree out of the ground," he said. "I have grown deep roots here." The Alameda County Board of Supervisors put the tax rate ahead of the possibility of atomic bomb fallout. It rejected a proposal by. the City of Hayward that fallout shelters, be tax exempt Hayward suggested such exemptions would encourage the building of shelters and thus aid civil defense. The assessor and the district attorney's office both held that this could result in every home being built, or converted, into a shelter of sorts, which would produce a chaotic situation Investigators discovered that smog bothers" 45 per cent of California's population one way or another, but only 4 per cent are so bothered they leave the state.

Maureen Martin, a sharp when they predicted 460 people would die in Labor Day holiday crashes, butnot by much. The toll was 41444 in California which as usual had the dubious honor of being the death leader. However, Oakland and San Francisco did their part in holding the death total down. There were no serious injury accidents in either city, let alone a death trash, during the holiday The University of California zoological team, which has searched the Trinity Alps for a reported eight-foot-long salamander, returned with an IV 2 inch specimen, which Is still a lot of waterdog. The trip was declared a success, "perhaps because the scientists landed some trout longer than their salamander.

Ray Norton, the Oakland-San Jose College sprinter who was favored in the Olympic 100-meter dash, had no alibi for his sixth and last place finish. '1 just tied up," said Norton sadly. The powerful Norton is expected to return shortly and play professional football with the San Francisco 49ers Attrition cost the University of California tw experienced linemen, men ho are in short supply. Dave Maggard, 220-pound letter-man and center candidate, quit because of an old knee injury. Andy Segale, a two-year letterwinner who was expected to be a first string blond who won $500 in a national contest sponsored by Kahn's department stores when it was still Kahn's knew exactly how she intended to invest the prize.

"J'll buy a popsickle factory," she said. Maureen is 10 years old. However, she doesn't intend to sink the entire $500 into the goodies project. "I'll buy some presents for my mother and father, too," she added Kahn's now is known as Rhodes. The Oakland store is a member of the West Coast chain known by that name.

The Oakland change makes it unanimous. There will be no change in ownership, management or policy. All husbands will receive bills for their wives' charge accounts shortly after the first of the month Department store sales in Oakland were up 9.5 percent during July, business officials said. Local college populations are expected to increase, which is as usuaL The new Alameda State College in Hayward, which opened last fall with 300 students, expects 1,500. The Berkeley campus of the University of California believes last year's 19,937 enrollment will be 21,543 this falL St Mary's expects an eight per cent increase to 850 students, while Mills College will be at capacity with 755 girls from 45 states, two districts and 16 foreign countries The price of obsolescence is high.

Fourteen double-deck stratocruisers, once, the ultimate in air travel, were ordered sold to satisfy creditor claims against the bankrupt Transocean Airlines. The high bid for the 14 aircraft, once valued at $1,000,000 each, was $105,000. They were bought for scrap. The traffic experts missed IN THE MAKING BRIDAL VEIL HMUB.ONE OF WAtnYSPors OfVOSEMrrE NAnONALPAftK. MUCH 01 WMtCH UEB WITHIN THI BORDERS Of MARIPOSA county FIRST CALLED The 250 men in the Alcatraz cell blocks bad spent the Labor Day week end quietly, but now Jtwas time to return to work, the jute mill and other prison shops.

But, each remained in his cell and told the guards: "I want to go back to work but I'm afraid to until the rest go back." The warden said apparently some anonymous convict leader had ordered the work stoppage and the others had obeyed, fearing a sudden thrust from an improvised' knife or club if they refused. Officials said the convicts ALCATRAZ CONVICTS I) CELL SIT-DOWN STRIK1 0aklanftjt.7ribunc! (on Tiwps Tut on U.S. TiV Spl Sends IWj.U H.bMkZZZ Al Cmlmnre Mown TROUBLE ON THE ROCK wouldn't be forced to work. Boredom on the bleak "Rock" they hinted would soon make the men eager to lift a constructive hand. But, although they didn't intend to do anything about the sit down strike, the officials, tense and ready, announced there wouldn't be a walk-out.

The clouds finally gathered over the high country, black but beautiful because they offered the promise of rain to dampen the Sierra timber-lands. But, instead of raia came thunder and lightning to strike a spark in the prime pine tinder. An estimated 350 fires were burning from Mexico to the Oregon border, none as large as the recent destructive blazes, but all a threat to our natural resources. Some 80 fires alone were reported In the Trinity Forest area, Tahoe AOytTISIMINT AGES 1 TO 80 ELIGIBLE TO APPLY Perwni aget 1 to SO years art now eligible to register under plan of burial insurance. Costs only a few cents a day.

Ia time of need, rrgardlesa of how little has been paid, the plan pays the face amount as specified. For example, $500 was paid recently on a funeral bill when only $4.58 had been paid. Issued by an admitted legal reserve insuror. Good at any funeral director in the United States or Canada. For free information writ Burial Plan, P.O.

Box 1432, Oakland 4, Calif. WHEN RUSSIA INVADED CALIFORNIA The hammer and fickle might now be flying over California if the" Russians' plan for colonization had come true. In 1806, the Russians sailed a ship into San Francisco Bay. The Czar's Chamberlain dreamed of making California a Russian province "devoted to agriculture and cattle-raising," but the Monroe Doctrine broke that bubble. You'll find the surprising story in Your Town Magazine next week, one of the AmericajriJIeritage series.

THE COVER From the sky, Oakland! downtown buildings present an interesting study in angles and lighting. This photo was taken by Tribune cameraman Buck Joseph from a Eay Aviation Helicopter piloted by Don Sides. By Mike Parks MOSEMITE WAS AN INDIAN WORD FOB ftOlTTLV BEAR AND WAS APPLIED BY OTHER INDIANS TO TO THE TRIBE UNING IN THIS AREA DUE TO ITS FIERCENESS, CALIFORNIA SPANISH EXPLORERS 111 Ws rig? ijm THIS AREA THE PLACE OF THE THIS NAME i IN THE SINGULAR FORM WAS LATER BESTOWED ON MARIPOSA COUNTY and ITS COUNTY SEAT TOWN.

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Pages Available:
2,392,182
Years Available:
1874-2016