Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on February 10, 1895 · Page 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
February 10, 1895

Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 7

Publication:
Location:
Logansport, Indiana
Issue Date:
Sunday, February 10, 1895
Page:
Page 7
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 7 article text (OCR)

LIST OF DELINQUENTS IN CITY Of LOGANSPORT. DeUn,uent for Ta^e* for tbe year 1893 aoo GOOD APPETITE. November, 1881, as Do«» Con- LOGANSPORT. ^^ Vl^tiMES Of OW>TERS ' Black Amli-fW do Joel W do (to Brunt Win Ballon C.'itli'irliiB M Burkhrirt llco. JO <!'» -•••• s 3 ji llV i Mil i« !)7 .' CnmnilnKS^a-pta j|]|2J LAND^i^D^OTS rj •5 do und i do v; |*c...... j do ('U **" d j (10 l do ..°"™ .1^.!.^. v "."'. j, i: y;;no'i'27i-2';;«'!-L;!!!"...-2 : CavmiWn Tin's!!'"!!"!.'. Wiri Lvwmi'ort w ! 2 do M;ID K : IIM)7 .10 do do HI:::IS; "" •• Closson K 1) I04H, do jftknnmn 'i>'u"!y.V!!!""!!! ill"''*/ Lowiirsiwrl lit; ilo ,. I'.'Ojr UO ^1^^111^} |i!;^ ; rwrViii;:;::::::::::::::::::::: ::. Ellison Mlcliiicl lliK!,Lo,;iinsi>ort Ever.wlo Jtacliiiol A do do 11 ij ' (10 • IITL'J: do Fiilrnmn J C :H (M ;! : •; ••" do (lo .Hi' •; .o t !iiisjjort...y.« ( Jrovh ^fftrtiu'ii 1 l'-^tf>) Uo ix>xiui>>.| ir s or , . GaiiKlofrJiioI''..'..' :|^; i-^Y^nort "".".'.'""'. '.'. Hewltt'j'S!."!"."-: '".•-.• Heeniin lliiry C do do do do UnnXen Mary J Ilanvon Nells do do do do Fermnn Jiio HnrdlnBCluirlotto JustlceeJ v, Jr iuid do Emma Knight 71ios do do do ilo Laroso N S (at- do do do do ionK Jno K nnd ) do Charlotte A J Lulrd DoniB «c(Jovern Torronce trus iKhthelsor Oeo MeWblnney >-r;i'nlt'..!!!:;[ do do McTagKiirt Jolin J., do do Mnnloy W H eat do WHnt ill MllJIkan F M do do do do do do do do do do do i.'o do do do do do do do do do do Myers QA O'Mura WK PomtToy Ciuttirlno do do do 'do do do Konch, Honry J do • <:o _ | BiiBli, Daniel H Klchiinlson.K PiWennlo Ryan, Murk D do do „ Smltli, Elizabeth do do Starr, EllxuJ Swljjnri, -rank Scliuman, Ford do Uo do do do ilo Sulltvmi. Mnry, trustee.. Trnpp, Mnr> ,1 Tnrple, Win Wilson, win T do do •Wells, MnrthaE Weber, Krnncoa B Welscli. Joliiirinii Wnrtl, Kllziiboth 131.1; 132T! ;asi KK.S1 :sa)7 isfi'i I.'H.'W i;i!Bi m'K i.ia-(7 l-i£ts M1SJO Mii'lU M77.| 1-I77.*J 1.1771) 14M)7 HODS MJI15 wVi MIWO iwaj 0-IK1 I55WJ 155(111 157-17 1S750 11X10V I1HXW mm 11)010 il»U IliOl^ HMIl-l iiio in IDOIU 1«)|H KW10 lli '20 ;«OS8 1C701 17003 17010 170KI 17071)1 70SOI 70S1 fit'ib't 7 ioi'-j"«j"l-2'»e I--- -i w'T!iwin\s"is'rt!'.'.'.'.".'.'.V.'.'.'.' '. '. LOK'inFport do do do Taborvlll"..!!!!!!".'..'. S Lo(?iiimport«i-2 Logiinaport block 1 i'/rKn's'iV't w G2 5-(i i'r blk : 11 . . LOKIinsport do d > d) do ... cio I— Lofrntisport do do e-ll WxlOa e pt 8 uf do LoKiVnsport do v «n ... pt lot 7 lot 4 e 1-2 se M... 2-1 Locnnsport 11 2C ft do lobtownwKirc Logiinsport do do do do do do Jobtown w pt n 1-2 wLoKunwi-2 .. Locansport mid 1-U Tabervllle Logunsport do • ' do ' Lojim.sport do do 75(!li 17007 LoRansport 7)11(5 do 17752 ,do ol-2 17753' 77M LORI"i!.pOtt w Ml-- ft .. 171)55 pt lot 1 e 1 2 so 1-4 J-l SOT;I pt Tot a e i-- SP i -i --i lS!C7ptlot2 Jiirltes Si 0 K.S17 S!18 Sill!) WI7 O 1 -".)! IKKII! 'J7M (1715 UOS-I :o(W7 .Wifl jOKiinsport, do ... ... do Block ] (10 do do w 1-2 v pt lot 2 e 1-2 sn 1 -1 2-1 LoKimaport n Molt do el-'-' do do n 3J-W2 i-2 ft' one lo i pt lot G lot 4 o 1-'-' se 1-J 2- f = u H S, :.: ::::: • • j i ^"u I ^ 3 i i j i i ".T;.V .'.'..v. irrj'Te alley fr ..,' 27 ~i'e ff "To 27 '"ie -•7 H- jff "io Rent J7 It- "l 50 i 1 a o'f . . , .. • l"5Uxl' o- '.'.'.'.'. i it 0 CP 2 3 „ ., M . b o — i " ~ i • = - : .: K „ i-' .'. 2!);' Ill 1 0] i 20- Ji .'.'..'.'. '. • Tf ' 't~ r ' -^•>. ' .. ii'i .' \ I •3 : -a D < • J 0 C.. . .f y c.. .. Wlilt !). .. B M S.. . LnR 1.. . <; rip i u'hlt '. P ,, P i. ? pi . <i*rii n .. .J Q C.. UA'l ^IcN L. . J K' J .' uini". 1 ;. 1> 0 '.'.'"«!' '. • ' -!! • '.'O"}'".'... ,-Ciist'r 2 Ir-.n^l'r 4 c !<»! g -~ f. r-^. llll -*" -^ '"DC !A Toi 'o 0, • •:. :::::: ?I: ; . I.")(J IK bj "- m if ""a" l^ll *" iii: 3'.!!!!l"!!!!!!!!!.".!.'!!!'.'.'.!i !si toO;!iiic->. ". jfii i! a 'ifcj y. ,...,, t , ,,,>,'.'.'.'.\ .'tin) !!!'.. • .IT", : . "iou ' • Hi "!(•,',' pr f ' j . 20-1 '. ! "ii'. wit)."!', ' "no .' '. 2U 1 ; "si '. 21!. . 112 . ' 15'! 5 . 1 . .' 12 ! . -11) . 50 M 01 . ""B ;. 71 .. 2-1 . '""T". 14... i C/J OUf,. 5!! 18.. o s .. u .. s .. 7 . 8 ., (i . S7 .. 3S (M .. 7 . 42 .. 43 .. o. 3 '.'. '"is '.,'. 11 .. 20 .. '"42 '.'. '"(S .' . 2S .'.'. 14',.. l__ jiC n wli'ft . E Pol.. .,TNT... 0 P 150 75 S7.r!" .. K K *» c- % ~ 7-' 74 S S 21 S 21 07 4 Of 4 » 2 21 iCK 5 *1 75 to U3 Inc -0 24 5i"i"<i'jii"ine. !!'.!!!!!!!.!.!._! is ^ •t> ,'! 4 ti< jlj ;j. 7; -I 7•SM U2 :i - 40 "'•jfi 1 !! 20;,.. HIUi 1 1U|'.'.' Mr'.'.'. loO' ... 1450'... 50.... 52. r i'... ' . r fin !«) ; J"F"J'.'.! '. OP"".'.' . STliom It A H. .' Liik i,. . Atkl'su . 0 P.... . LiiKl... .JNT.. . Taylor. i GaU l"." . Dykw 3. LdR2.. - f,, fi rj - ' . Latt £, . . Tiiyior.. DVKC 4.. GTIp 3 fr'Tl'j) "i Cust'r 2 » Dyke'-i.. B M S... D Con... B M S... OP.... Cast'r2 St«v«ns A Con,. Clifton. Clifton. Clifton. Stevens O P 0 P Whit 3. 0 P.... (iorli'rt |LaR2.. B' M S.V. do ... Slev us S JIT... Brown . 'Brown '. «nll 2... do ... Djke 2. 0 P.".".'.' do Conrnd. "2'S "•'56 "fob' '"i)0 '355 ""50 1-1 . AlJ f'i'5 '"16 "6'6 .1 K J. ...i Ad ml' i; 2^0 2(l r iiOt 75i 7(10 1U5U DO 075 1000 4(X. 23C 100 S.50 450 30 3(1 100 00 (100 775 355 100 30 50 375 ICO 150 GO SO SO -i- 1 on 100 35 •10 COO 45 550 25 2a 50 100 115 fib C50 115 1225 05 10 90 100 !K) 1 •-•' SS 0 !W 1 2 b irj";i:::::::::.::::::::::::::::.::: if] :;""".'.'"!"!"'." :s.i tof);: inc S7 S (Ml i 1 2 3 K7 .S 0 !)0 1 2 S |jo ;l t t tlt , l( k\ to%' Inc IJ.* '> '."'& 2.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. " ' '] i "i! "V ] 1 1400...:... 275: Si) 50 00 2000 JlirtO 3X1 500 5;>o 225 8-1 to 03 Inc 1123 OJ 23 02 3 023 023'.'.;'.™!!.'"!™'.!;.".""' ()2 3 „,,.. 92 s!!;;;;;;.;;;;;;;!;;;;;;;;;;;;; !I2 3 y> |j ;;;;,;;;.;.'.;.'.'. 92 3 84 to931ne 8-1 toOSine 8-1 to 93 inc 01 2 3 91 2 3 92 :l 1)2 3 12 3 923 87 to 03 Inc S7 to 03 Inc )2 o 92 3 87 to 03 Inc S7 to 93 Inc SI to 93 Inc 32 to 03 Inc S3 to 031110.....'.!!.!....... 82 to US Inc «J to 1)3 Inc...'..'.'. «lto931no S3 to 931HC 85 to 93 Inc Si to 93 Inc 92 3 92 3 11 2 3 J23 84 to 93 Inc. — ~ S4 to 93 Inc SI to 03 Inclusive S4 lo 93 Inclusive vl toOSlncloslve g v •»•; Sff . o Sc " a i HI . -i -ir 1 u V P ..!r 52 'i 1 1 OS 4 *<1 ; \)'i 1 H!i: 2 97 1 IK.IJ 2 97 1 -li '•' ^' l"."i7 l^l i >3 24 1 Oi || j — 5 ^Js I—I 1 S!) rt -* 3|) 3ij U) (to 8 14 8 12 •1 01 'JO 00 24 07 i us o :£} 5 13: 11 0! SI 2 13 1 25 9 -l.J I.') 44 .v 1 '24 1 22 :r 70 'V-i'Tu 2''V> 1 4S> " l \i •1 .JO' J 7 4 50, 1 17 2 55 14 2 24 85 9 02 5 18 n |V 2 \ r 1 ,S!) 1 25 -1 00 1 25 '"f'i'ii SOS 12 35 (i 80 10 95 7 25 10 20 88 S 50 10 (K) 7 10 7 S4 3 70 1 48 12 58 0 10 3 38 333 1 57 1 111) 1 57 2 2! 1 57 2 05 (i! 1 K l 1 73 1 09 «a 2 53 i -n ii3 5 20 1 20 1 T(i ' "7 9 32 S 88 15 20 (I 2(1 C3S 500 1 70 4 94 7 3-1 4 12 7 CO IS 99 5 10 13 58 6 87 15 07 9 53 S 59 0 77 T* M 2 70 9 55 11 70 H SO,' 88 2 SS 2 8(ii 2 04 3 OS 4 OS 3 3li Jo 3 !'."..'.;" - .'.'.V. 12 04 )T28. !!!!!! i i r> ~ J123 11 SH IL' 3 5 02 12 3 , S7 to 93 inclusive 7llto93 ' i" 3 JS 12 1 20 30 1303 12 53 5 30 j2 3 2072 23 -108 12 ;t , 3 32 U to 93 71) to 03 11 23 1123 )23 i>i y ,, ,,,.. U2"3 i 81 to 03 Inclusive 4 90 27 95 C9 3D 81 S4 4 44 4 90 7 (iO 33 87 1 S!) 1 W 1 SO 2 65 1 41 1 •& 1 25 1 57 1 01) ) 73 3 -10 ] 25 2 0!) 1 41 2 85 2 05 i 8!l 1 57 2 53 00 2 05 2 02 Cl 2 S5 Cl !«i 03 i i~< IK! 2 37 2 37 1 41 3 33 01 5D 2 0!) 2 53 1 25 3 SI 1 Od 03 1 2.". 4 !)3 1 57 1'. -1!) 13 57 1 Oil 1 25 7 21 2 ,o: o w i '22 2 11) 22| 2 11 o"-'lV 7 U 11 1 Oh 1 08 1 S'. ia o i 5-1 5 07 2 St! 2 70 & 1 07 D 34 3 78 8 10 1 0-1 " U7 0 21 11 02 4 32 $% 92 9 IS 4 80 32 1 08 97 4 32 i 01) <i 04 8 38 3 50 1 08 32 2 00 4 07 1 08 1 02 1 34 54 SO SO 80 82 1 08 DS 1 OS 3S 48 648 •VS 5 04 •13 201 20| 3S 54 1 OKI 7(J 12 14 01 1080 2 44 1322 70 iTsi (i 7j 0 7i 5 37 32 00 IS 27 1C 5S 9 20 S io U 34 20 1)7 12 21 21 20 10 7U 24 70 240 l(i 52 3-1 27 12 119 14 75 749 ' 3 09 24 29 12 43 4 OS 4 03 7 5» 3 60 1553 17 73 18 09 20 43 U 29 7 33 27» 8 19 J2 97 0 29 11 01 23 73 6 95 17 13 S 14 13 78 12 40 11 56 933 10 2» 3 98 12 OS 21 30 1 7ft 23 05 • 1 97 4 05 4 Oi 3 19 4 55 731 505 2G 55 3 03 '25 12 !) 47 34 07 267 80 ""6'Sj 1720 1 OS 1C 14 3 021 10 53 15 )2 2 9S 242 39 05 S J5 C 07 2 70- S 85 5-1 83 42 5-1; 0 4G 21 00' 10245 3>S SS. 134 29 3 2-1 1 8 77 5 5(i; 11 71 5 72 242 }5 14 4550 AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE I, JOSIAH G-. POWKLt. Auditor ot Cuss Coim .. by the Trensuror or suld County, and remaining dellncinei as In tbe tax duplicate, and lire cu:irseU with tlio amount ot dell quo 1 ;. Interest und changes Hint innj bo Onfl there ottered tor slae. THE CZARINA'S FINERY. Bhe Twl«t» Her Younu llunband Bound ller FlnRort In n Dcllchtful W»y. TVo have been hearing some very pretty stories of tho young czarina's kind heart and benevolent instincts, and the manner in wnich she is alleged to be twisting the czar round her angers is described as perfectly delightful from an English standpoint. With all her graces and virtues, however, Alexandra Feodorovna has a woman's lovo for finery and trinkets, and she is giving evidence of an intention of indulging 1 it to tho utmost. Slio has just given a Copenhagen jeweler a truly regal order for a diamond coronet and a, necklace of oriental pearls. The coronet, which is to bo framed of Greek crosses and worn in the Grecian knot of her hair, will cost two hundred and forty thousand dollars and the necldaco •will'bo worth three hundred and forty thousand dollars. Besides the rich jewels that belong of right to the czarina, presents R-uore are pouring in upon the young empress. The shah of Persia sent her a superb pearl necklace, which has quite a history of its own. In reaching the Russian capital, says a society tattler, this necklace only returns to its original home. It originally belonged to Catherine the Great, who was so fond of it that she used to sleep with it aror.nd her neck. . ' Hut' greatly attached to it though she was, Catherine for some reason or other gave it to one ol her two Orloff favor- ^itcs, who took it first to Germany and •then to Paris with him. In tho French capital he met with that extraordinary adventurer, St. Germain, tho magician, who went into the best circles, wns a great favorite with the king, and, in fact, ruled the court society of the day. This brilliant charlatan, who used to assert that he -was over eighteen hundred years old and had known the Sa- .viemr in Jerusalem,.bought this necklace from OrlofT and sold it to the Par. I sian envoi'. Thus it found its way to the land of the lion and the sun, whence it is now returned to tho land of the bear. FIRELESS PEOPLE OF TO-DAY. An Aliy»slnlttn Tribe KIIOWB Nothlnff of Cooking—1'rlmUivc AndmnnulteM. If the eating of flesh food be instanced as a distinction that separates man from anthropoids, it can be urged on the other side that the latter feed on insects, and when in captivity b} T no means despise flesh food. The first man, too, was probably a "vegetarian," but necessity and the absence of sufficient vegetable food for his augmenting species may have driven him to a flesh diet. The cooking or roasting of meat must bo regarded as an acquisition of n later epoch, because in the earliest stages of man's development there was undoubtedly a very long firelcss period, and because there are said to be fireless people even in the'present day, such as the Dokos, in Abyssinia, observes the Fortnightly Review. The Australians, too. knew nothing of boiling and roasting food until tho advent of the Europeans. For the rest, all the savages know how to kindle fire by tho well-known method of friction of two . sticks, or, what is simpler, they.take a torch along with them on their wanderings that never goes, out. The Andaman!tes preserve their fire by consuming the interiors of hollow trees. Since the Andamanites have come in contact with Europeans they have superseded this method of preserving fire hy the iiso of matches, which are very favorite objects with them. They eat their food either raw or roasted, less frequently hoiled, as they, have no cooking utensils. Moreover, according to the latest accounts from Otto Luders of these savages, great mor'cality prevails among them, and they withdraw themselves into the woods more and more at the approach ol tlie Europeans. They go completely or almost completely naked, live in holes in the earth or under overhanging ^oeks, or build themselves a sort of rough hut with branches and loaves. Their weapons are spears, bows and arrows tipped with iron, which they seize as booty from the wrecks of stranded ships. Their hatchets and axes, formerly made of stone, are now made of iron, and are bound to tho handle with thongs. They only count up to three, a.nd have no conception of God or immortality; they believe in a good and bad spirit only, hide their dead in the ground or throw them into the sea or lay them on wooden scaffolds, dance to the tune of a sounding board, have a very keen sense of vision—with their arrows they shoot fish that no European can see—are of a fierce, suspicious disposition, and, according to Luders, they probably constitute the transition of primitive nations of Indians to Australians, a remnant of an extinct people. They are of nearest kin to the Ncgriton of the Philippines. Their body height is fifty- six to fifty-nine inches. .Tha Homes Know tho \Vny. A team pulling a loaded farmer's wagon on the way to the \Vallabout market went slowly along the car tracks in Broadway, Brooklyn, the other night. The driver was asleep. A car came up behind the wagon. The motorman sounded the gong vigorously. The team turned out of the trades, while the driver kept on slumbering. When the car passed the team returned to the, tracks. "You can see that every night," said a policeman. * ; The teams are just as: intelligent as the driver himself. When once the farmer reaches Broadway and he knows he has an intelligent team he feels safe and goes to sleep. The horses know the ring of the trolley cars and know just what it means," It Indicate * Perfectly Clear •cicnce or a Troubled One? ', ! Is the appetite, as the doctors say, ' ! the test of a' quiet or troubled conj science? The former owner of the Bar- ; j reau restaurant at tho Palais de Jus- ! I tice, in Paris, has been questioned on j i this point, says a correspondent of tho ! i London Daily News. He remembers : I many accused persons who triumph- ! I antly proved their innocence to be so j much upset by the mere fact of being- • i in dotcntion as to have lost all power '; I for dnys to take food. Prince Pierre . = IJonapsirte and the due d' Orleans not . j only lu'pt their appetite when in con- | | flnemcnt in the Palais de Justice, but j j ate more heartily than iu ordinary ; j times. The minister of the interior uu- ; I dur M. Ollivier gave orders that no re- , j striutions were to be placed on the culi- j | nary supplies Prince I'ierre miplit de- : i mand. M. Constans wns not less indiil- . j pent to the young- Pretender, who is ; j now niehnamcd "Le Prince Gumcille." ; j Prince Pierre asked a very day for a ; ! dish of carp's milt truffled. This wr.s, ' ; as he said, to whet his appetite. ; I The due d' Orleans did tho fullest jus- ; ;. tice to every dish prepared for him. He ; .'scut his friend, the due de Luyucs, to I j thank the restaurateur for having pro- | I vidod him with tempting 1 , delicious and j nutritive food. Tho due had done j nothing 1 lo trouble his conscience, ( , nor had Prince Pierre. M. Rochefort J al—ays lost appetite in detention. Dr. J Lapommcraye, who poisoned Mme. do ! Pawo to pet insurance money, was very I agitated in detention, but he enjoyed j his munis and was particular in what j he ate. Gabrlella Bempard, who was , charged with having 'helped Eyraud to ' hang the process-server, Gouffo, longed for bavaroises or chocolate au lait, with delicate rolls of bread and fresh butter. The owner of tho Barreau restaurant is obliged to serve meals according to a, tariff, which is low. QUEER MATERIAL FOR ROADS. Cotton CUoCh Employed In the Construe- wioD of 11 iff hwiiyft' One- of tho materials used by tho Massachusetts highway commission in _ making roads at Martha's Vineyard is cotton cloth, says tho New York Post. In localities where the soil is sandy much stone has hitherto been wasted, the sand forming a loose and shifting bed on which the stone made very little Impression. Gravel spread to a depth of three or four inches over the sand was found to afford a stable medium between aand and stone, but at Martha's Vineyard gravel was not obtainable: henee tho experiment with cotton cloth. This material is even better for tke purpose than tho gravel, as none of tho Sand works through to tho stone; The following information about road construction in Massachusetts has been furnished the National Agricultural Hoard by the commission: "Before tho Massachusetts high way commission was established ninny towns were obliged to maintain long stretches of highways of little importance to them, but used as ways of communication between large 'centers. Outside of tho cities there aro a little more than twenty thousand miles of roads in Massachusetts. It is estimated that from ten to fifteen per cent, of this number arc roads directly connecting the towns and large centers, and such as might reasonably be asked for as state highways. Fully fifty per cent, of the annual appropriation for highways is expended for the maintenance of these intertown roads, which should go for town ways. At all angles in the .road are being placed monuments, six feet long, six inches square on top, and dressed twelve Inches from tho top. On one side are cut the letters, M. II. U., standing for Massachusetts highway board. The monuments^are set live feet under ground." WOMEN MAKE POOR SPIES. A Scci-ot-Sscrvico 51u:» Sny* tho fair Sci | Do yoi Succrotl us DctcctlveK. "Women are not good detectives," said an experienced secret service man, OH being asked his opinion by a New York Herald man. "To begin with, there are many places to which a, woman cannot go without exciting suspicion and this defeats her object at the_outset, but 'oeyond this a woman is unfitted bv nature for detective work. "••In the first place, she jumps at a Luiiclusion and acts on it in opposition lo ail human probabilities, possibilities As a rule, a \vomau docs i ;j:io looks on a tiling as sin: to be or Uih;ks it ought to be -iiu v.'ul follow thai theory, faii.e is led iiy prejudices, favors or sympathies, re- <.-U;-UiObS Of UiCUi. "As a detective she is sometimes a ; -.uccuss in uiilnipping a man, but her v.-oi-i; "•uncraiiy cnua ia c. blunder which ix^niyb her. "ssh- is persevering only -.-.-I,c;u luovi.:! by passion, ihe uoes not ioo;: ut a ^li.vj dispassionately. She at •jaoo dooiiiua that ho or slie is guilty or innocent ;:nd works on that theory. ' "A woman enjoys the mystcriouj, and sho is so elaled at her position as Utrtoctive tl-.at she is unable to conceal her identity. Or the secret, investigation ••".Youicn are uvuu failures in running down cri:.iina!s of their own iic.-c. A v.-uir.ao criminal will miiilead a woman uut;.-i;livo by working on her vanity, (.-reality or sympathy, and. worst of all, if liie di'ttctive be attractive acd the t^iiii criiiiisal handsome—iveii. a man is belter lor dcr-^liv;: v.-orii, z.z.3. besides, a \vcit:an \vili s*.-ii out :i cc.-.; 1 ;iiiO cheaply at thi:l, reiviar;' upon iicr s^:c to es- cdpe pu"is:iir.trii if detente J. Marrl»str S'i/itl-t'.c:;. Out of 1.000 meu who marry, 333 marry younger women. 579 marry vcoriien of ths same age, and 80 tnarry What is ;I.EU reahou uo'. reason. sv.:;i::; it N OT WHAT WE SAY, bat what Hood's Saraaparffla Docs, that tells the story of its merit and success Remember HOOD'S CURES, Castoria is Dr. Samuel Pitcher's prescription for Infants and Children. It contains neither Opium, Morpliiuo nor other Narcotic substance. It is a harmless substitute for Paregoric, Drops, Soothing: Syrups, and Castor OIL It is Pleasant. Its guarantee is thirty years' use by Millions of Mothers. Castoria destroys Worms and allays fevcrishucss. Castoria prevents vomiting Sour Curd, cures Diarrhoea and Wind Colic. Castoria relieves teething troubles, cures constipation and flatulency. Castoria assimilates tho food, regulates tho stomach and bowels, giving: healthy and natural sleep. Castoria is tho Children's Panacea—the Mott:~ ; "3 Friend. Castoria. " CastorlA Is an excellent medicine for children. Mothers have repeatedly told mo of its good effect upon their children." DR. Q. C. Osooon, Lowell, Mass. « Castoria is the best remedy for children of which I am acquainted. I hope tho day fa not far distant when mothers will consider tho real Interest of their children, and use Castoria in- itead of the various quack nostrums which aro destroying their loved ones, by forcing opium, morphine, soothing syrup and other hurtful •genU down their throats, thereby Bending them to premature graves." Da. J. F. Kructno-om, Oonway, Ark. " CastorUv ia so vrclS adapted to children ttu* I recommend it os superior to «mj- pnwcriptfcB Imown to mo." H. X ABCHKK, IL D., i:l So. Oxford St., Brooklyn, K. T. " Our physiciajia lu tho ebllJrcn's dcpMt- rtcnt have epokco highly of their experience In ticlr ouUido practice -with Cuooria, and although wo only ha-re among our modlcal euppno* whnt in known •» regular products, yet w> BTO frao to conf«»» th»t Uw tncriu of Castoria boa -won ua to look wttb UXITID JTOsrlTAI. ALLEN C. S«rrn, fnt., Bottoo, The Contan* Company, TI-Mnrp»r Street. New Yorh CitT* iN THE WOFRL-P I For keeping tho System In a Healthy Condition. CURES Headache. CURES Constipation, Acts on tho Liver and Kidneys. Purifies the Blood Dispels Colds and Fevers. Beautifies tho Complexion and !•• Pleasing and Refreshing to the Taste. . SOLD BY ALL. DRUGGISTS. «3-A mcoly illustralftd cicluy-pntfe Lincoln Story Book irivcn to every pn-clm^r of a package of Lincoln Tea. Price Z5c. Aslc your drnfrgisl.or LINCOLN TEA Co., Fort Wajr.c, Ind. or by IT r ort r WAREETVV'EhN f.'.OTIVE POWERS. Cooncctlcat to \VlJnfsn « Contest Kctwenn j;iertr;c' : r.y snd *t.;ai:>. Connecticut h ciCK'. ; iv.'<l to be the first state in which the hnUlu between steam and clectrioiiy will be thoroughly tested, says the Utiea, Observer. For many years the railroad business of that state has been COD trolled by 'what is known as the Consolidated road. Legislation in -the past lias been very favorable to this corporation, and it has been impossible to build, rival lines of steam railroad without the consent of the Consolidated—and of course ^this consent was not to be secured. When trolley cars tame into existence shrewd observers saw in them a possible means nf finally accomplishing 1 the downfall Df the Consolidated, and as the improvements in the means of using and applying electricity as a motive power were rapidly perfected the hopes of trolley line projectors grew. The result has been the securing of a larjre number of franchises for trolley lines, and already the most important towns along- seventy-five miles of the Consolidated ire united by lines of double track electric railways that permit of contin- pauous ssage. Many other franchises have been granted and appearances indicate that through service may soon be secured bet,vecn Xcw York city and Uarlford- It is an Interesting battle, because it brings into competition two great forces, steam and electricity, which aro doubtless destined to compete against Each other in the future. It is also interesting- to note that in all cases where the steam and trolley roads parallel each other in the Connecticut example, the trolley roads have proved to be the roost popular. This is doubtless in a measure, due to the fact that considerable local prejudice has existed against the monopoly controlling the steain roads, and wherever an opportunity presented itself to turn business over to the trolleys it was done. A ClilnHiuaii's Meal Vile. Chinamen of Australia, when they take a notion lo marry, write to a matrimonial agent in I.iong Kong something as follows: "1 want a wife. Shorn ns-t be a maiden r.n'lcr twenty years, of age. and must not have left her father's house. She must also have never- read a book, and her eyelashes must, behalf an inch in length. I)or teeth must be as sparkling as the pearls of Ceylon.. Her breath must be like unto thct scents of the magnifk'ent odorous groves of Java, and her attire, must btt from the silken \veaversof Ka-Ja-Cliinff, which are on the banks of the greatest, river in the world—the overflowing Yang-tse-Kiang." Thcalligatornever leaves fresh water, while the crocodile frequently travels; long distances bv sea. It has been seen one thousand miles from land, and it is. possible that these sea-going crocodiles, have given rise to the sea serpent, stories. MERCURIAL POISON results from tbeumml treatmcnto!blood trouble* by which Hie Byslcm is filled with mercury ana ixturet—more to be dreaded than tJJfc- null in a short while isiua-worsocos- Supar-from Cm*. According to a German "Review of Science for the Year 1S94" there is a process now under trial in that country and also in France for making sugar "synthetically" by means of common illuminating- £2*- The gas first enters a box provided with a porous partition upon which platinum has been deposited by some secret process known only to the inventor. The platinum particles act upon the atoms ol gas and those of the vapor of water which is introduced at the proper time- In close contact in this manner condensation and precipitation occrnr, the residue being- commercial sugar at great parity and of highest grade. The cost is said to be mnch less than that of producing beet sugar, and the owners" of the gas sug-armakicg secret claim that" they will eventually drive all other sugar producers out of tho bnal- ditiou ttiou before. RHEUMATISM^* and aching Joiuismakc life ml°CTublc. 8.S.8. a reliable cure for mercurial rheumatism, « afford* relief even after - — all else him failed. Itia (ruarantced purely vefje- uble. and absolutely harmless; take no substitute. Send for our trettto on blood and kUauta, Gc* A LADY'S TOILET la sot complete without an ideal PGZZONFS Combines every clement of I beauty and purity. It is beautifying, soothing, healing, Iwaltk- ful, an* 1 , harmless, and when tightly used is invisrole. A. most I : P delicate and desirable protection I ' jV; tc the face in this climate. ' i"l laslit upon hartrg tio genttia* - ,r i3 FOR SALE EYERrWHISE.

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page