The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 11, 1954 · Page 14
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 14

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Monday, October 11, 1954
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Page 14
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BLTTHEVILLE (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS MONDAY, OCTOBER 11,1981 Freighter Survivors Safe in Port Eleven Rescued After 2 Days Float; 37 Die NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — Eleven seamen, survivors of the capsized freighter Mor- mackite, were safely in port today with harrowing tales of two days floating helplessly in stormy, shark-infested waters. Lost In the disaster were 31 of their shlpmntcs, including the rap- tain, Patrick J. McMahon of Valley Stream, N. Y. A Coast Gunrd bOnrd of inquiry sets out this morning to find a full explanation for the sinklrit,' last Thursday, apparently caused by shifting of the ship's iron ore cur- go. The 6,000-ton vessel capfjml so quickly there was no chance If) send a distress message and crewmen were unable to get lifeboats into the water. The ship carried no life rafts. The Mormacfcite sank under the brutal pounding of wind-whipped Atlantic seas 150 miles east-southeast of Cape Henry. The 11 survivors were brought to to Norfolk yesterday by three Navy destroyer escorts. With them came the bodies of 12 who died. The remaining 25 bodies were not found and presumably went down with the ship or disappeared more ler- rlfylngly among the sharks that survivors reported seeing by the hundreds. Some of the sharks were "12, 14 and 16 feet long." reported Pa- tadio del Valle of New York City. One of three who clung atop a makeshift raft, Del Valle said rescue came just in time to keep hl.s group from taking their own lives. Alter his arrival in port yesterday, he told newsmen: "On the last day we started to think how we could take our lives away the easiest. When you're drinking salt water and taking It Into your lungs, It is terrible. Yesterday (Saturday) morning the three of us decided to do it. Then we saw a Navy carrier and then there were planes. Another hour and we would have been tlead." Physicians at the U. S. Public Health Service hospital here snld none of the 11 survivors was In serious condition. The Coast Guard called, off the search for other survivors yesterday. NEW JOB - Actor Edward Purdom poses with Rita Stetson who makes her screen debut in Hollywood's new movie, "The Prodigal." A former New Vorlc- «r, and niece of a famous hat company executive, Rita plans to make acting her career. TAG ALONG—Tobor lakes little Robert, lh« robot, for a walk down a New York City street. Tobor (robot spelled backwards) requires a man inside to move him nbout for Aiming the movie, "Tobor the Great." However, Robert walks and 1,-ilks by himself with the aid of an internal winding mechanism. Vietminh Welcomed In Hanoi HANOI Indochina Ml—Elements of the Communist-led Victminh 305th niul 35211(1 divisions, loaded down with the booty they won nl Dicn Bicn Phu, paraded through the crowded business section of Hanoi yesterday. Making their first gala appoar- ancc In the city they took over from the French Salurdny night the Communist-nationalist army was given a spirited welcome from the holidaying population. The troops entered into the festive mood. Many of them carried bouquets of flowers, sung strummed on guitars and playet accordions as they made their way clown the Boulevard Francis Gar- nler, in the center of the city. Prominent among the array of materiel they, trundled through the streets were American 105mm cannon, bazookas and light arms captured from the French lust May at Dlen Bleu Phu. us well us Russian antiaircraft guns, Jeeps, com mand cars and trucks. Among spectators were U. S. Consul Joseph Corcoran, members of the three-nation tnUM-rmltorml armistice commission and a score of foreign newsmen. Foreign correspondents remaining in the city Include the only six nonollicial Americans still here, four Britons, ciKh! Frenchmen and two New Zealanders. Two women ait inionn them. Twenlv other foreign newsmen fearing IheV would not he able tr Kcl out lalcr, lell Hanoi Saturday hi for Hitiplumi-!. Corcoran lolc the Americans remainlni: that Ihc Slate Department had iiistruclnc him not In Hive Ibfin shelter 01 provide them with cmutmmicattoi ^lilies even as a last resort. By KliNK J. CAI'l-ON TOPEKA, Kan. Iti - Stepping oftly but taking long strides, Kanas school oiilclals lire moving rap- dly toward complete integration I white and Negro schools. The atmosphere has been one of great calm. •Hie South has been deeply tirred by the Supreme Court de- ision last May that segregation n public schools is unconslltution- il Integration steps In the na- lon's capital, In Jiallimore and Iher communities have produced arent protest.';, student strikes, ven minor riots. .No Debate Here in Topeka, a step-by-step ntegration program lias caused carccly a ripple of debate—much ess u vociferous opposition. Topeka's Board of Education was a defendant in the segregation case before the Supreme Court, but t was a less than enthusiastic litigant. In fact, it lumped the gun m the Supreme Court ruling last rear and decided to merge the scg- •cgaU-d elementary schools in the state capital. Today Supt. Wendell Godwin reports that 12 elementary schools nive been fully Integrated, two nore partially. That leaves only five school districts for comple- ,ion of the program. "I am deeply grateful to the community's sense of forcbarance, tolerance and self-discipline," he .old a reporter. "Cooperation has icon perfect. I don't know of a single unpleasant incident." The principal of one large school ulcerated this fall In northeastern Topeka said the system is work- Kilrly Air Kxprrss First :iir expre.s.s shipments were llown 1001) vi'iir.s nun, when fre.sl i hi 11 u itiiHo.si'il in liny silk bags were iiltiu'hi'd to the Iriis of car rler pi^ron.'; nnd Inm.sportcd foi coiisulrriible distances. FUtL HOURS OCT. 24 ih WATCH THE PAPERS > KansasMovesRapidiyfiutQuietly, Toward Complete Integration Ing "just perfectly." 'The kids took to each other," he related. "The parents cooperated splendidly. As to the teachers —well, one teacher accidentally wasn't assigned any Negro students in her class. She came to me asking lor a rearrangement. She was afraid people might think her attitude responsible." Few Segregated Segregation has been something of an anomaly In Kansas. Only 10 major cities maintained separate schools under a permissive state law enacted In 1867. and even In those segregation has been generally confined to elementary schools. For many years, white and Negro students have attended high schools and colleges side by side. Of the nine segregation cities besides Topeka, seven have fully mappled their local integration measures ami are carrying them out without fuss, fanfare or friction. Atchlson, the proslavery center In the days when Free Boilers and Dixie partisans clashed in "bleed- Ing Kansas," set a fast pace with integration of all but one of its divided schools this fall. It took the further step of hiring, for the first time, a Negro teacher to Instruct white—and eventually mixed -classes. Lawrence, also in eastern Kansas, has hired a Negro to teach elementary school physical education. Parsons, in southeastern Kansas near the Oklahoma line, virtually finished Integration this term. Wichita, the state's largest city, permits elementary school students to attend schools of their O'Dwyer Will Testify Before House Hearing EL CENTBO. Calif. I/I 1 )— William O'Dwyer, former mayor of New York who served a term as U. S. Ambassador to Mexico, has returned to this country to testify before a congressional committee. O'Dwyer has accepted an invitation to appear In Los Angeles before House subcommittee Investigating Communist Infiltration In Latin America, scheduled to meet Thursday mid Friday. The former New Yorker arrived nt Tijuana, nenr San Diego, by plane from Mexico City yesterday and then cnme by automobile to the rnnch here of his brother, Frank O'Dwyer. At the Tijuana airport, O'Dwyer said he Is practicing luw In Mexico City and plans to live there the rest of his life. He declined comment on political matters, saying: "I've hung up my shoes," indt- choice regardless of race. Two to Walt Kansas City, Kan.,, with the rgc-si Nej;ro school population— ;omc 5,300 or one out of five students—has decreed integration as rapkUy a'.i classroom space per- nits. This was the only city which maintained .segregated high schools IK well a.s elementary schools in recent years. Two cities—Cof/eyville and Fort Scott, in the southeastern part of the slate—have decided to wait until the Supreme Court issues its orders specifically charging the course of desegregation. The high court will hold hearings on the subject in December. The Topeka Board of Education, meanwhile, has informed the Supreme Court thiit no desegregation orders will be needed in its case, since the matter is being taken care of. Our position as a defendant was peculiar," Godwin said. "The original action was brought in 1948, agsiinst a board which has since gone out of office. The present board has opposed segregation all eating he hvus given up politics. He said he did not know if New York authorities planned to ask him to testify on any matters there. He added: "And I don't know if they asked me If I'd go. It depends on how much time I have." Scientists are developing electronic "eyes" for the blind. Designed for those who prefer an Instrument to seelng-eye dogs, the devices warn their users of hazards which the blind person counters on busy sidewalks and around the house. STOP! It fffom common coM hang oil Chronic bronchitis may develop if your cough, chest cold, or actilc bronchitis )s,not t rented. Gel Crcomulsion quick and use asdircctcd. It soothes raw throat nnd chest membranes, loosens and helps expel germy phlegm, mildly rclnxcs systemic tension and aids nature fipht the cause of irritation. Crcomulsion is guaranteed to please you or druggist refunds money. CREOMUITSION rtticwt Coughi, Choit Colth, Aeutt Bronchitis well, where's your rollofTUMS? When Acid Indigestion Strikas, a handy roll of Turns in packet or purse tan he "worih its weight in gold." l : or Tunis give- top-speed relief from gas, heartburn, sour stomach — yet can't over-alkalize, can't cause acid rebound. Turns re- ciuirc no water, no mixing — take them anywhere. Get a roll today. TUMS FOR THE TUMMY SARASOTA, FLORIDA Where Summer Spends the Winter Every day is o fun-filled Jay at sunny Sarasota! Winter home of the Greatest Show on Earth — (tingling Brothers — Barnum & Bailey Circus, Boston Red Sox spring training, Ringling Mu- icum or Art, jungle gardens, sandy beaches and fabulous fishing. Yes, you will enjoy eventful, extiting Sarasota — day nnd night! The Sarototo Terrace if the finest on Florida's famous West Coast — swimming pool, shufflcboord courts, excellent dining and cocktail lounge. American and European plan. Guests enjoy privileges of Lido Beach, Bobby Jones golf course, including free transportation to these facilities. "Southern Hospitality" SARASOTA TERRACE, P. O. Box 1720, Phone Ringling 2-0421, SARASOTA, fLA. For a Merrier Christmas in '54 IT'S l.ATKH THAN YOU THINK! Christmas is just around (lie corner,, and wise folks are gelling a jump ahead of the 1 !);">•! holiday season by planning for it now! They have found (hat those last minute additions to their Christmas gift list requires extra cash which may not be available. So they're doing the smart thing— opening a savings account with The Farmer's Hank and Trust Co. 1 A small amount deposited regularly will build up to a sizeable sum for your Christmas gift-giving. All accounts guaranteed by the F. r>. i. c. "The Bank With The Chime Clock" The Farmers Bank and Trust Co. "Mitfissippi County's Oldest Bank" TlMI TRIED — PANIC TESTED OPEN YOUR CHRISTMAS SAVINGS ACCOUNT ROW! Fred Says: We've Got the Values! „ MEN'S SUITS GREATLY REDUCED One Lot-Timely and Style Mart Mostly Double Breast Suits Values to $65 PRICE OR LESS 19 5o 2450 29 CHOOSE YOUR SIZE FROM THIS CHART Reg. 34 j 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 39 j 40 j 42 j 43 | 44 46 52 sT 2 9 ]12 I 5 | 21 1 5 | 1| 1 Short- 31 21 3 1 Long | Half Stout I | 2| 3| 7| 7) 3 3 I 1 1 Ml 2| 2 6 6 SHOES By Nunn-Bush and Edgerton Reduced and More! all Styles and Colors 9 95 -14 95 -16 95 CHOOSE YOUR SIZE FROM THIS CHART 8 | 8'/ 2 j 9 | 9'/2|10 AA ! 2 1 1 9 112 1 7 |10 ill 8 212 When tht Man Who Know*— Buys Hit C/otfcet R.D. Hughes Co. Fred Sandefur, Mgr. Alan Berry, Owner

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