The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 10, 1956 · Page 14
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 14

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, February 10, 1956
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Page 14
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f AOfl FOURTRTO BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEW* FRIDAY, FEBRUARY"!*. Commodity And Stock Markets- N«w York Cotton Mar ...... 3558 3560 3545 3553 May ........ 3495 3496 3486 3489 jBly ........ 3399 3400 3382 3385 Oct ........ 3204 3209 3194 3196 New Orleans Cotton MM . 3665 3568 3556 3567 May ........ 3496 3496 3486 3488 July ........ 3398 3WO 3380 3386 Oct ........ 3205 3211 3193 3196 Chicago Wheat Mar .... 216 S16V4 215% 216!'« May .... 211 211% 211 211>i Chicago Corn Mar .... 1309s 130" 2 129 May .... 134>/ 4 134% 133' Chicago Soybeans Mar .... 249% 250 248!' 2 248!' 2 May .... 253','j 253% 252% 252 ',4 July .... 254% 255'i 254 254 Sept .... 241J4 241% 241 241 New York Stocks A T and T 181 Amer Tobacco 17 Anaconda Copper 67 Beth Steel 146 Chrysler 72 Gen Motors 43 N Y Central 40 Int Harvester 37 Republic Steel 43 Socony Vacuum 67 Standard of N'J 153 Sears 33 • U S Steel •• 52 129% 133% Livestock NATIONAL STOCKYARDS, HI. tfv-(DSDA) —Hogs 12,000; steady to lower- bulk mixed IT., S. No 1, 2 and 3 180-230 Ib 12.50-13.25: few 13.35; several hundred head No 1 and 2 mostly 200-225 Ib 13.50; about 75 head mostly No 1 around 210-220 Ib 13.60; mixed grade 230270 Ib 11.50-12.75; some mostly No 1 and 2 around 230-240 Ib up to 13.00; 270-320 Ib mostly No 2 and 3 11.50-75; individual head down to 11.26; 140-170 Ib 11.00-12.50; 110140 Ib 9.75-1.50; sows 400 Ib down 10.75-11.35; heavier sows 9.75-10.50; boars over 250 Ib 6,25-7.50; lighter weights 8.00-50. Cattle 700, calves 500; generally steady; good to low choice steers 6.00-18.SO; utility and commercial Wnd« 1S.50-15.50; commercial and good heifers 15.00-16,50; most utility and commercial cows 11.0012.50; individual commercial cows to 13.00; bulk canners and cutters 8.50-11.00; top cutters up to 11.50; utility and commercial bulls 12.5014.50; odd prime vealers to 32.00; bulk; good and choice kinds 22.0036.00; others mainly 14.00-20.00; cuil and uti-Hty 8.00-14.00. BRIBE (Continued from Page 1) to handle campaign fund matters, then asked Kahler from whom the contribution came and how big* it was. "It's an envelope with 25 $100 bills," ha said Kahler replied. Case quoted Kahler as saying the money came from "the fellow who was down to see you recently" about campaign funds and whose name was "Mr. Neff." "I couldn't recall the name," Case said, adding that he immediately started an inquiry as to whether Neff had been in to see him. Case said this was in the late afternoon, about 6 p.m. Washington time. His office was about to close-and the few staffers present could not remember any visit from Neff .Case added. Didn't Know Him Case said the "first thing in the , morning" of the next day he asked 1 the rest of the staff if they knew Neff. Mrs. Mabel O. Connell, his receptionist, he said, told him she thought someone had been in the office "who identified himself as knowing Mr. Kahler" and might have talked with Opal Van Horn, Case's legislative clerk. The latter, Case said, was in South Dakota at that time to attend the funeral of EVANGELIST—Oia Woolsey of Memphis is the evangelist at revival services now in program nightly, except Sunday at Fill! Gospel Tabernacle, Lilly and Vine Streets. Services begin at 1:30. Ready to Grant Dog Franchise, Dunaway Says CONWAY, Ark. Ofl — The chairman of the state Racing Commission said today that "personally" he is ready to grant Southland Racing Corp. a dog racing franchise, "and leave it up to the 1957 Legislature to straighten out the law." Dr. Edwin D\ma\vay, contacted here after Chancellor W. Leon Smith formally overruled the commission's rejection of Southland's application, said: "Personally, I am ready to go ahead and . . . get this mess over with . . . However, I can't speak for the entire commission." The next meeting of the commission is scheduled for Hot Springs Feb. 25, the day Oaklawn Jockey Club opens its annual horse racing meet. Chancellor Smith yesterday announced formally his decision to overrule Atty. Gen. Tom Gentry's demurrer. Gentry challenged the chancellor's authority to hear an appeal of a Racing Commission decision and contended that the Racing Commission had discretionary powers in handling franchise applications. Gentry refused to accept the chancellor's ruling and said he would carry an appeal to the state Supreme Court. Judge Allen, SeMo Juror, Taken by Death HAYTI—Services for Joseph H. Allen, 58. retired Circuit Court judge of Pemiscot, and New Madrid counties, will be conducted at 2 p.m. Saturday from Richards Funeral Home in New Madrid with the Rev. Robert McCoy of New Madrid officiating. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery at New Madrid. Judge Allen died at 7 a.m. Thursday at Pemiscot County Memorial Hospital here following a heart ailment of several months. Judge Allen practiced law at St. Joseph, Mo., for 15 years and later moved to New Madrid, where he acquired large land holdings. Allen served on the bench from Coruthersville Council Meets CARDTHERSVILLE— City Council's regular monthly meeting this wek was short. Council voted to have a street light placed in the alley surrounded by Bushey and Eastwood avenues and Seventh and Eighth streets. Council voted to remove stop signs on East Seventh and East Ninth streets at Walker avenue. Stop signs will remain on Walker avenue at the intersections, giving motorists traveling on Seventh and Ninth streets right-of-way over drivers on Walker avenue. SMALL FISH Gobies are small fish which live to the ocean. Some, found near the Philippines, are only from one- third to one-half-inch long when fully grown. her mother. Case said he telephoned Griffin and "I told him I want to know more about the background of'the contribution." He said he instructed Griffin to keep the money "intact" in whatever form it was received. Case gave his testimony uninterrupted to that point. Charles W. Steadman, specia counsel to the committee, had started the questioning by asking Case "to tell the committee of the circumstances that precipitated your making the speech" in which Case first disclosed the offer to the Senate. Wells -2" to 16" Irrigation - Industrial - Municipal - Domestic WATER is our BUSINESS We Drill For It Pump It Soften It Filter It Cool It Irrigate With It GINNERS- TAKE NOTICE: Let w furnish your water needs for fire fighting power Mtk cooling, for slatifiers. HOME WATER SYSTEMS 3 Y«an to Pay Complete iron removal, filtering and softening systems built to fit your needs. W« h«v« the answer »t> your needs for greater water and McKinnon Irrigation Co. ftient 111 or 190 — Manila, Ark. 1851 to 155S, when ne was lorceu w •etire because of ill health. He leaves his wife. Mrs. Dora Lee Allen of New Madrid, a son, Dr. Josph H. Allen Jr. of Nashville, Tenn.; a half-brother, Gene Allen of New York City; a half-sister, Mrs. Roland Smith, and his stepmother, Mrs. T. B. Allen, both of Nashville. Bob West Rites Are Conducted CARUTHERSVILLE — Services for Bob West were conducted Wednesday in St. Louis with burial in Cape Girardeau. A former resident of Caruthersville. he died in St. Louis Monday. He was a retired railroad brakeman. Survivors include a sister, Mrs. Laura Langdon West of Caruthersville. Other survivors are his wife; a daughter, Geraldine; two other sisters, Mrs, Louis Patterson and Mrs. Nixon, both of Alexandria. La.; and two brothers, John West of Decatur, Ala., and Charles West of St. Petersburg, Fla. Brunkhorst Services Held CARUTHERSVTfiE—Services for George Brttnkhorst, 56, who died here early Monday morning, were conducted at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Lutheran Church in Festus, Mo. Mr, Brunkhorst was found dead of a heart attack at The Coffee Shop, which he owned here. Mr. Brunkhorst was also engi- LEARNING HOW — City Clerk Gary Sparks, who was clerk for a day, learns what goes on in the office of Bill Malta (the real article'). Deputy Prosecutor Todd Harrison is shown handing Gary a court case to file as City Clerk Malin looks on. It was all a part of Boy Scout government day. (Courier News Photo) FARM (Continued from Page B were limited to that of good milling quality produced in states designated as commercial wheat areas. Support levels for other wheat would be based on its value as livestock feed. Another provision would base cotton support levels on average staple length instead of the present %-inch middling. Opponents contend this could lower cotton supports about 3 cents a pound. The 'committee left in the bill a provision to sell surplus cotton for export at competitive world prices, but cut out a section that would have allowed domestic sales, at reduced prices, of the amount of cotton that would have been grown on retired soil bank acres. The bill as 1'inally drawn was ordered sent to the Senate by a 12-3 •vote. Three senators—Anderson (D-NM), Williams (R-Del) and Schoeppel (R-Kan)—voted against the bill. Ellender said some others reserved the right to oppose some sections of it on the Senate floor. IN THE PROBATE COURT FOR THE CHICKASAWBA DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTJ, ARKANSAS IN THE MATTER OP THE ESTATE OP NO. 3,3» J R COLEMAN, Deceased, Last known address of decedent: R.P.D. No. 3, Blytheville, Arkansas. Date of death: January 1, 1956. Tile undersigned- was appointed administrator of the estate of the aliove named decedent on the 8tn day of February, 1956. All persons' having claims against the estate .must exhibit them, duly verified, to the undersigned within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice, or they shall be forever barred and precluded frorii any benefit in the estate. This notice iirst published lOtfc day of February, 1956. J. C. COLEMAN, 116 West Sycamore, Blytheville, Arkansas. Reid & Burge, Attys. • 2/10-17 ncer and maintenance foreman at the Brown Shoe Co. factory here. Before moving here in 1952, he had worked for Brown Shoe Co. at Festus. Survivors include a wile and four children at Festus. ElzieW, Duncan Dies; Services Are Tomorrow Services for Elzie Wise Duncan, 52, will be conducted at 2 p.m. tomorrow in Cobb Funeral Home Chapel by the Rev. Harold Thompson and the Rev. Louis. Emmert. Burial will be in Elmwood Cemetery. He died last night at Chickasawba Hospital following an illness of four months. Born in Dyersburg, Tenn., Mr. Duncan had made his home in Blytheville the past 34 years. At the time of his death he was employed as a dry cleaner for C and W Cleaners. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary Kelley Duncan of Blytheville; two daughters, Mrs. Harold Moore and Mrs. Sam Evola of Detroit; one sister, Mrs. Johnny Fleitz of Blytheville and one brother, L. P. Davis of Kennett. Pallbearers will be Harold Davis, Max Egan, Curtis Freeman, Max Graham. Henry Thompson, Char- 1 ley BHlingsley. March Draft Quota Is 192 LITTLE ROCK, Ark. sas' draft quota for March is 192, state Selective Service Headquarters announced today. The March call compares with a February quota of 76, and a March 1955 call of 143. About 250 men will be ordered for induction to fill the March quota. Negro Deaths Lathan Nickerson Services will be conducted at one o'clock this afternoon at St. Paul Baptist in Barfield for Lathan Nickerson of Armorel, who died at his daughter's home in Memphis. Surviving are his wife, Delia; three daughters. Lucille Sanders of Memphis, Mary Coleman of Armorel, Minnie Lee Rosebar of Chicago; a son, Jake Mannings of Armorel; four brothers, Oscar of Day- tdn, Ohio, Ernest of E. St. Louis, Walter and Tom of Prairie Point, Miss.; four sisters, Mattie Easter, E. St. Louis, Mary Cobbs of Gilmore, Maggie Murry of Prairie Point and Estelle Murry of Isola, Miss. Hev. W. B. Deck will officiate at services. Burial will be in Carr Chapel Cemetery. Pemiscot Traffic Case CARUTHEHSVILLE — William Harrison Jones entered a guilty plea in Pemiscot County Magistrate Court Thursday to careless and reckless driving. Jones was fined $5. plus costs, by Judge Sam Corbett. • ' SALT LAKE CITY W—A Marine recruit sent from here to San Diego, Calif., for basic training should have no trouble. His name: Richard Pratt knows- lis-gun, a Crow Indian from Big Horn, Mont. • In time of illness or any household emergency call on this Reliable pharmacy. We'll gladly deliver any item you may need. We call for prescriptions and deliver the medicines without additional charge. Yon will find this Family Drug Store a good friend in time of need. WOODS DRUG STORE The oar says UO and the price won't slop you! THE 860 TWO-DOOR CATAL1NA Easy way to break the small car habit f It's the hardtop buy of the year with the most power and size per dollar of any car in this style. If you're accustomed to buying in the low- • priced-three range, chances are you're paying for Pontiac's size, performance and distinction — but you're not getting it! As a matter of fact, you're not euen coming dose! Where else at a price so low 'can you enjoy bossing tie most modern, most advanced power plant in the industry-the mighty Strato-Streak V-8? Where else at a price so to can you get the luxury of Pontiac's optional Strato-Flight Hydra- Matic-America's newest, smoothest automatic transmission? Where else at a price so low can you find a big 122-inch wheelbaae, such luxurious interiors and all the other< fine-car features that put you so squarely on even terms with buyers of far costlier cars? Come in and see how easily this heart-lifting Strato-Streak beauty can be yours. Once you do, you'll be out of the small-car ciass forever! You can actually buy a Ug, glamorous Ponifac 860 for (ess tlian you would pay for U -models of Die low-priced NOBLE GILL PONTIAC, INC Fifth & Walnut Phont 3-6817 Over 15,000 Arthritic and Rheumatic Sufferers have taken this medicine since it came on the market. Free information by giving your name and address to BBA'ZIL MEDICINE CO., P- O. Box 522, Hot Springs, Arkansas. We Buy Ear Corn FARMERS SOYBEAN CO. "Home of Sudden Service" Broadway & Hutson Phone 3-8191 Mead's The Only Exclusive Men's Store In Mississippi County VALENTINE'S DAY IS FEBRUARY 14th Keep your love, traveling in smooth style with...... Streamlite Samsonite Luggage .•* Say, I love him '•. .' with a men's quick tripper '. *19 50 * /' Say, / loVe her '• HOLDS MORE ... sir«,mlH* « . i -i T' » * Somionite'i Trflln Co« holds 52 ,. with a ladies tram case] ,„„, •„.„,, A « «,„, h^ * streamlined non-torniihing broM . * locbl $17 50' 'pita fox EXCMMTC SffMBflfiM jUMlOllliQ • New, modern tapered-shape, for compact packing in your auto trunk! » Strong enough V> Hand on-defies every bong and bump of constant travel! • Carries more dothet in l«s space—keeps them wrinlHe-freel • Tongue-in-groove construction keeps cW and moisture auH • Six betttr-thon-leather finishes-wipe dean StreamKte Sonwomte... the Most Popular Lagging* m the World...Because it's Strongest and Smarletti CREDIT ACCOUNTS WELCOME 30-60-90 DAY TERMS

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