The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 1, 1944 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, June 1, 1944
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Page 6
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f AOE SHE lanier Suffers j < His First Loss Of The Season Browns Again fop American League Clubs ;By I'nUeit Press The Brooklyn Dodgers, and Die Kew.York Giants—both riding win- nine streaks—still are ft long way froiii third place ill the National League. They're tied for fourth syot, but:they're still three games behind .'the 'third-rung Pirates, The Brooks stepped up against Nick Striiicevich, In »)i nrc-llglit gaitit at. Ebbets Field, and toasted him. to a .'turn. The Dodgers laid down a five-run barrage In the third frame wlitcli clinched nil 8 to 4 victory; over Pittsburgh. Auglc Cjalan got a homer, Luis Olrno and Mickey Owen tripled, and Dixie Walker added three safeties to his total. Cal McLlsli, the Brooks' 18-year- f>ld hurler, pitelied five-hit ball and took the game. ••'Homers were the fashion yester- day'nt New York's Polo Grounds.' Tlie Giants licked the Chicago Cubs 8 .to" 5, with Napoleon Reyes con- nectlhE tor two round trippers, av.cl Danny Gardella ]ioiinrtliig out n third.-Frank Scward went the route for the Giants and allowed six hits —including, a three-run homer in the first, by'Don Dallcssnnriro. : .The Boston Braves humbled Pitcher'Max Lanier —who hadn't !ost;a game this season—and handed the St. Louis Cardinals a 5 to 1 defeat. Charlie Barrett turned In a ; seven-hit pitching performance /or the winners. The Phillies snapped a thr«e- gnme losing streak mid eased out the :Cinciimali: Reds 5 to 4. The Phillies fired a two-run rally in tlid last hnlf of the seventh, which gnvi> Charlie Sclmtiz his fourth victory of the year. .The St. Louis Browiis—staging a story : book ending—beat the Washington Senators 4 to 3, playing under mazdas nt St. Louis. Tlicy stepped jto the top of the American League—in a percentage tie with the Yankees. The Senators were leading by two "runs, going .into the last hulf of tlie ninth. Then St. Louis scored twice to-tie-the game at 3-all. Tlie winning run was pushed across In the eleventh frame. Al Holllngs- worth, who took over In the seventh, was the victor. ThS Detroit Tigers gave the New York'-Yankees a taste of their own medicine—belting out a last minute 6 to 2 victory over the world champions. Al ,Wiser,, n substitute catcher, was the hero of the day. He camo Another Beazley Q/2-YeAS-Ol.P JLJ(3(SICH £UT LAST ScASON IN COAST Travelers Move Up In Flag Race T03 Safeties Bagged In Wild Night Of Baseball Jiy United Press There was hitting in plenty In Southern A.ssoclntion ball parks iflst night. And the major change In the standings was the new second- place tic between Birmingham and Little Rock Knovlllc's consequent rise to fourth place. The up and coming Smokies hammered four Birmingham pitchers in'lhe first two innings ot their game, and built up a lead the Barons couldn't match. Each team was good for 16 hits, but the Smokies hn ( i the runs—14 to Little Rock and Chattanooga also tied high up in the hitting list, fach with 14. hut the Travelers stayed well ahead In runs scored. The final tally was It to G, after Little Rock turned back n lute to bat In the ninth and -slammed Lookout rally, out :a round-tripper with three) Nashville hunched the major por- aboard tt> make Forrest Orrell thcjtion ot 13 safeties In the fifth and winning pitcher. . sixth Innings,' scoring nine runs lor Tlie Cleveland Indians staged a five-rim rally In the third inning to beat the BostonTled Sox 1 to 4. Oscar Jiidcl was the victim of the uprising, and Ed Kleiman-who Look over for Vern Kennedy in the fifth —racked up the <rin. Philadelphia;at Chicago was called in t the third because of rain. Here's today's baseball schedule: . In the National League, St. Louis plays at Boston. The Cubs meet tlie Qinnts at New York. Cincinnati invades Philadelphia and Brooklyn is host to Pittsburgh. A Philadelphia game at Chicago tops the American League schedule. Boston plays Cleveland. The Yankees tangle with the Tigers at Detroit, and Washington invades St. Louis. Crime Declines In Mexico MEXICO CITY (UP)—A survey by the director general of statistics shows crinie is declining steadily In Mexico. During 1039 there were 23,420 felony cases. There were 21,318 of this type *in 1942, and a compilation for the first four months of 1943 indicated a total of 20,000 . for thdyear. Some.38 per cent ot Chicago'hus- bands'help'- their wives with the dishes, according to a survey. a 9 to 4 .win. aver New . Orleans. Jesse Danha was the loser, and Ernie Balscr allowed nine hits for the Pelicans. Atlanta ended Ellis Klntler's six- game winning streak on 13 Jills and five Chickasaw errors, by a 9 lo 4 majority. Chnrlie Coznri <|id the night's safest mound job—allowing only e'gl't safeties for Memphis. Today's schedule continues the same scries, in Atlanta. Knoxville, Nashville and Chattanooga. Today's Games SOUTHERN LEAGUE Memphis at Atlanta, night. Little Rock nt Chattanooga. Birmingham at Knoxville. New Orleans at Nashville. NATIONAL LEAGUE St. Louis at Boston. Pittsburgh at Brooklyn. Cincinnati at Philadelphia. Chicago ul New York, night. AMERICAN LEAGUE Philadelphia at Chicago. Washington nt St. Louis. Nen- York at Detroit. Boston at Cleveland. R«wl Courier news w«u» Kl» Archer Jo Meet Lqrkin Tomorrow By United I'rcss i Freddie Archer — who, once ran »way from home because ' his parents wouldn't let him be a boxer— meets Tippy Larkln In a Madison Square Garden headtlner tomorrow. Ana when he steps through the ropes against Larkln, he faces the 5U\> who'se jlnxed him all along the ilne. Larkln has accounted for two of the five defeats Archer has run ip against in 59 professional bouts. An the Newark fighter has tangled with some of the toughest welterweights In the business following the bumpy road to fame. He's met an ( i conquered Beau Jack, Nor- maii'Rublo and Cleo Shans, not ojice but twice. And he even took a decision over the Great Ike Williams— who has touplcd plenty of top-notch fighters In his day. Although Archer has been right BLYTHEVILLE (ARK,)'COURIER NEWS DOPE BUCKET THURSDAY, JUNE 1, 19-M BY I, P, FBIKND ONK DOWN, M01U-: TO OO No. 3 brother, is enroute to Greens- March 28, 1944 Is n red-letter (Jay boro. N. C. from Sheppard Field In the life of Meiit. L. C. Posey. Texas. . . . s-Sgt. Phil bross for. . . For on Hint day lie bagged mcr manager of [Intel Noble Is an his first Japanese plane since he Instructor at Pueblo. Col . pfc entered the India combat area 1111- Charles (Butch) Morehead whose der Col. Phillip Cochran. ... In bauds at Blythcville High school n- letter dated May 8, Lieut. Posey rated among the best in the Stale dramatically revealed his latest Is now In McCook Ncbr He has single achievement. . . . "Dear been at th e following places: Tent Polks", he starts out. . . . "It gives City, Fla., Laredo, Texas clovls N m e a great deal of pleasure ln"an- M.. and Victoria, nounclng that I Imve shot dov/n my I "Contrary to the Kansas, experiences of first Jap. a month ago, but Ijust had 11 Hunt and Jlmmlc Parks for ex- confirmed yesterday. . . . I was nmp | e . l hMenl heard anything trying to shoot down a bomber.but praise for Arkansas I lee when the Zero jumped me. so I'unusual shol him down, Instead. . It happened about some of your oilier readers George towns", he pens. . hot him down, Instead. . , . I shot Pfc. Carlos Deal, Chick grid' alter- ip his engine, because the Chlne.se ]n,u- captain In the 1941 chain, 01- S'. s J hR L fou '! (lvU S11K1 707- ship year, has completed his radio y. . . . It was course at Scott Field. 111., nnd lias Date of mniiu- been sent to Yii thing else was okay, brand new. fneture was Feb. 44, and him down on Murch 28. me one Jap flag on the side of my I shot ther training Have' ' 'uma, Ariz., for fur- Sham- ship now. Maybe I can equal ' Capt. Calvin Moody's record, (note: Captain Moody had three officially confirmed. Two that he got while on the ground are pending con- flrmatlon) . . . 1 am still flying the same kind of planes as 1 was at Key Field (Mcrldan. Miss.) ... Today I got some sheets for my bunk. . . . will be the first sheets since I left the States. . . . Can hardly iwiit to try them out! MAKES DISCOVERY "Buck" Housh, promising Chtck- asaw back during 1940-41 now a member of Uncle Sam's valient Seabees on duty in the Southwest Pacific, Is getting first hand Information about n lot of things he hadn't ever dreamed of experlenc- Javelin! Champ Plans To Enter AAU Tournament Capt. Martin B. Biles, aircraft maintenance officer at the BAAP, will go to New York city June 17 to compete for his fourth championship in the Javelin-throwing contest of the National AAU Tournament. Captain Biles won this contest In 1940. in 1941, while'a student at the university of California. Then, he returned to competition last year, to win the championship again with a loss of ,202 feet, five inches. Pfc. David Murphy, physical Instructor, will probably again accompany Cnpialn Biles to the tournament, Last year, Murphy won fifth place In the Junior half mile at the tournament, running the 880- yard race In I minute and 58 seconds'. Bowling Tournament To Be Held At Post Alleys An Open Bowling Tournament will be held for officers, enlisted men, wives of military personnel and civilian employees at the Blythevillc Army Air' Field June llie sami and soiu foylunate lug. . He wrote Hnrry (Hnnk) lialncs at the University or North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. c., that he had just finished his first fresh water bath since leaving the States. . They managed to catch enough rain to get a shower. . . . "Now I know why they call n sailor an old salt" The matter ot netting one's laundry done on the siding Island where he currently Is re- is causing no end o( concern he writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Rough. "There are up there the best of them, he's never rated a Garden bout— until now. The Jersey fishier enlisted with the Seabees two years ago, but was three ways of getting the laundry done here: by the washing machine that we rigged up; the ba- tallion laundry, and the ocean, by means of tying them lo rocks and dousing them in the salt water. . . . There Is still another wny, that of leaving them in the ocean overnight, then go back and get them the next day. . . . You worry about getting them clean the first three days. . . . nut the last, you worry aubul getting them. . , . . given n medical discharge 13monthsl" Bl| ck" hns seen a number of lo- latcr, and since then his rise has cal boys: Jackie Trotter, Bill Web- been rapid. He earned the Garden bout, with a sinashcroo victory over FrlUlo Ztvic—the veteran former chnin[»— several weeks ago. Archer attains one ambition tomorrow—just fighting in the Garden, boxing's big league. And if lie trips Tippy f.arkin -who represents his persona! even better. Waterloo— he'll feel Baseball Standings SOUTHERN LEAGUE Memphis is 13 Birmingham 19 14 Little Rock ; 19 14 Nashville 13 14 Knoxvlllc IV 14 Atlanta 17 15 New Orleans 10 22 Chattanooga 922 W. L. Pet. was dree e nough lo spit on, bill were at attention and I couldn't." An older brother. Ernest, lin- .shes his "boot training at San Diego, Calif., this week. CALLING AM. I'ORTS Guess who is Pvt. Herschell Be- sharses c.O. In Italy? . . . None other than our old friend. Major Dick Tipton. . . . It is Herschell's Job to supply the Anzio beachhead with munitions and supplies via AMERICAN LEAGUE W. U New York 20 15 SI. Louis 24 18 Detroit 21 20 Philadelphia 19 19 Washington ID 20 Cleveland 1922 Boston 18 21 Chicago 16 21 » Far From Maddening Mutuels »t! NATIONAL LEAGUE W. L. St. Louis 25 13 Cincinnati 22 15 Pittsburgh 19 15 New York 18 20 Boston 19 22 Brooklyn IB 20 Philadelphia 15 19 Chicago 11 23 .591 .578 .576 .562 .574 .531 .312 .230 Pet. .571 .571 .512 .500 .497 '.403 .462 .432 Pet. .058 .595 .559 .474 .463 .474 .441 .324 Without worry regarding winner, Bclmont Park employee relaxes m grassy shade of tree and muses as thoroughbreds pound around turn for home. Fle^lair shows way to field of 14 three-year-old limes .here, but wound up no better th.an third. Songburst won. Yesterday's Results SOUTHERN LEAGUE Knoxville H, Birmingham C. Little Rock 11, Chattanooga G. Nashville D. New Orleans 4. Atlanta 9, Memphis 4. AMERICAN LEAGUE Detroit G. New York 2. Cleveland 7, Boston 4. St. Louis 4, Washington 3. Philadelphia at Chicago, rain. NATIONAL LEAGUE New York 8. Chicago 5. Boston 5. St. Louis 1. Philadelphia 5, Cincinnati 4. Brooklyn 8, Pittsburgh 4. ster, Herbert Graham, Jr., Carl Hood. . He said that one clay he saw Bobby Walden. "lie truck. The two remaining Besharse boys at home ni«y soon join Homer, Howard and Herschell In the service. -. Monroe, the Itect-footcd scat back of the Chicks last year, already has passed his physical and is awaiting his orders. Herman, the oldest and also a former tribesman, expected lo be called but hns been given a deferment because of his age. . . . But he says he may decide to go on In with Junior. . Scrgt, Howard. Vines, Former Tennis Star Goes All Out For Golf DENVER, June 1 (UP) — Ellsworth Vines—who once represented the United States as a Davis Cup tennis star—Is going all out for golf. He spends every minute he can chasing the little pill around the Denver Country club course. Vines is the pro at the club— and also \\orks at a Denver war job. He's one of the few top-flight athletes to make good at golf after starring in another line of sport. Sammy Byrti — a ranking "golfer these days—Is another. He once was an outfielder for the New York Yankees. Vines hasn't been,near a tennis court for months, and has no Intention ol returning to that sport after the war. He says: "Golf is a more interesting game, and it takes more skill. It calls for mastery of more than a dozen clubs, for ability to handle courses that arc heavily trapped, those that have extra long holes -inrt rolling hills." The ex-tennis star Isn't a duffer as a linksman. He recently fired a hot. three under par G9—which is good going in <my league. DON EDWARDS ik« ROYAL, BUTTH, OORONA, AND REMINQTDH PORTA»L» J Jt k r k W Ki 4mH4 111 M. tod ffTRZKT B« B»U»tietorj) PHOK1 W» KODAK FILMS Developed and Finished THRKDAY SERVICE Guaranteed Work . . . Reasonable Prices O'STEEN'S STUDIO 105 W. Alain K lor that group of ys in Italy. . . . Des- that Ills APO l.s 4)H. Capt. Byron Walker 'icrs, ho hasn't been locate any from Mis- 'y. and lie's mighty familiar fnce. through tile 10th. Prizes will be awarded In both singles and doubles competition nnd there will be separate brackets for the men and the women. Play will be In the Post Bowling Alleys, wlierc nn air conditioning unit has been installed for the comfort of tatprs. J*' THE ' the bowlers and spec- 1 withits heal rash misery. Sprinkle on Mexsaiia, (ho • eootliinii, medicated ixnv- der. Coafd tittle, ami you tiavti luU in Ictrgei idles. 617 ^ Ring Is Right Squared circle is passing out in California, where circular ring has been Introduced. In exhibition wltli Vic ampico for shipyard workers at Sausallto Maritime Recreation Association, Fred Ajiostoll. left, finds round ring speeds up game, eliminates stalling. OLIVER I'-AKM EQUIPMENT Sales and Service HARRISON AUTO Ash 1'AIITS CO, Phone 2552 _ FATHER'S DAY IS SUNDAY, JUNE 18th G' T ' S Be sure to choose a gift that will do justice to the big occasion— Father's Day. In our complete selection of men's clothing you're bound to find the ideal gift for Dad. ALWAYS A SAl4 B ETON K OK OUR SHI UTS—it's (he ideal i;ift for any man. We carry all sixes in plain svliile nnd pitslel.s, or in snappy stripes. Hiitlon-ilowu or winged collars. 2,24 up ,SI'AKKI,V Ai\[) HiUG'HT, AND ALWAYS KlttHT, arc KU.V silk lif.s. Plain, print or striped in pastels or hnllianl Siinlli American, colors. $1 up FOR OUTDOOR LEISURE He'll enjoy liis out-of-doors hours in one of our free-cut, easily laundered slack suits. Smartly tailored in a variety of colors. 9.95 up CASUAL AND COMFORTABLE .Sturdy sporl shirls in spun rayon and cotton. A "must" for Summer. Whiles, colors . and figures in every wanted KI/.C. 2,24 up R. D. Hughes & Co.

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