The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 28, 1955 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Friday, October 28, 1955
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Page 2
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PAGE TWO Prices Continue To Rise Slowly In Many Lines By SAM DAWSON NEW YORK (AP) — Prices continue their slow rise in many "lines as manufacturers adjust to higher costs. But nowadays retail prices don't necessarily follow wholesale prices as they tended to a generation or so ago. Price increases wore announced! years. this week in many fields—from: But retail prices in the last year newsprint to tin cans, from tires! have tended to sag more often than BLYTHEVI1M.E (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1S55 corduroy, from plywood prunes. Consumers may feel some of this increase in the weeks ahead. The newsprint hike. for example, brought a quick prediction that the price of papers anrt oi the ads in! them may have to go up. too. | ( , . , , The rise in tin can prices will; MlSS be felt by the canners preserving 1 next year's foodstuffs. Whether they pass it along to the grocer, and he to you. will be determined then. Tires, Tulies Up I to climb. The reason is eoinpeti- lio:-. in styling and quality has counted as much with the public as has the competition in price. TONKAWA. Okla. if: — For the fourth .straight year "Miss" Piani cis Lansdon of Tankawa was among jn have 400 women honored with Invitations t , ]e exc!usive Miltrix Table Din- Most rubber companies hiked the factory price of ._ tubes and tube-type car and truck.| t at j 0 n was turned down. Lansdon, tires. For the average passenger, publisher of the Tonkawa News, in car tire the price rise comes to 35) voicing regret pointed out that he's cents. Again, it will be the retail j a m |jicr—and not qualified to attire seller who must make the cle-' cision as far as the motorist is concerned. As the new models of cars continue to make their debuts, factory list price increases over last year are usually announced. They average aroun~i 5 per cejit. But the denier has the final say. Predictions of further price increases shaping up come from several sectors. •ncr at Norman, Okla. And for the fourth year the invi- lend the social function sponsored by a women's professional journalism fraternity- Imported Rabbits Become Menace LANSING. Mich. IP) — Rabbits „, ac^u.o, brought into the stiue by sportsmen But the Federal Reserve Board to train beagles are spreading out sees inflation pressures generally! o\er Michigan in such numbers that. :heck. It reports: "Credit! the State Conservation Department held .. restraint In all major industrial is worried, nations, including the United States, has helped to maintain general price stability and so to mod erate the swings in the world trade." Finished goods that the merchants buy have changed little in price, as a whole, in the last three The animals aren't the ordinary cottontails but a strain of San Juan ._ rabbits—the type that swept through 'alue of] Australia. The big rabbit burrows deep—from two to eight feet—and CHS YEARBOOK TALK — Virginia Ann White, business manager, and Janie Kindred, editor, discuss plans for the Cotton Blossom, yearbook at Caruthersville High School, tl'hoto by Sanders) Richest Pickets On March at Richest Plant NEW YORK W) — The world's richest pickets struck the world's richest corporation yesterday. Eighty-four Cadillac salesmen, with an average income of jll.OOO a y ear _and some making as much as $40.000 — struck General Motors Corp.. .which will probably net a billion dollars this year—a record figure for any business enterprise. The issue in the walkout is Job security. The salesmen recently joined to AFl Brotherhood of. Teamsters and the union prompt! yopened negotiations with the Cadillac Division of General Motors. A firm spokesman said only a portion of the total sales force went, on strike, affecting showrooms in Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn and New Rochelle, N. Y. Carolina Cotton From Arkansas LO ANOELES lift — Helen HaR- scroin Braunedorf, X. the yodeung entertainer, has legally changed her name to Carolina Cotton. "I've b«n Carolina Cotton forj (he past 10 years," she told a Judge yesterday. But she admitted she was born in Cash. Ark., and has never been to the Carolina*. Olditt Pupil Heraldry nou* is known as the "science of armorial bearings." No Fun to Eat when you havt Sour Stomach Falling Parcel Caused Trouble INGLEWOOD, Calif. (XPr— Driver Harold O. Orwig. «. made a grab for a package about to totter out of his delivery truck. But it was too late. The package fell out. followed by Orwig. The driverless truck kept going and crashed into a parked car. Orwig and the package were unhurt yesterday but the car wasn't so lucky. ALBUQUERQUE I/P — AlbtlqUpr- que claims the oldest elementary school student in New Mexico. She is Mrs. Teresa Rodriguez. 23. of Mexico City. She wants to learn English so she can study beauty culture. She's taking her classes at Coronado School. Public Sale of a 1051 Pontlao 4- door serial No. P8UH 32411 will bn held 11-3-55 2:00 I'M tit CM AC, Blytheville. Ark., where car may be inspected prior to sale. We reserve ilw riRht, to bid. General Motors Acceptance Corp., South Bend, Ind. Account no. 29631 R-S1." 10 28-29 Read Courier News Classified Adi. Oh-h-h / has been known to undermine buildings. He also can do a great deal of damage to crops. Russia's Gifts Save US Money I ELLSWORTH. IOWH^ i,P; — Ralph; Olsen of Ellsworth/ a member oi: the Iowa farm delegation that visit-; ed Russia during the summer, tells j how delegation members used a Rus- ; sian gift to save American taxpayers j some money. { The Russians gave each member j of the delegation a suitcase full ot j champagne, but the cost of ship-1 ping it home would have been pro- j hibitive, Olsen snys. So the Americans gave it away— to to the United States Embassy in Moscow, Flying: Pioneer Some of the first experiments in over water fly ma in the United Slates were made in 1906-1907 by Israel Ludlow, with a giant kite- likt ylider towed by tugs. Best-Known Home Remedy For suffering of / COLDS Y/ICKS W VAPORUB Rub on Relief...Breathe in Relief ££&"*£: but handy TUMS neutralize excess add fasti If you suffer from acid indigestion, try ihis top'Speed way to relieve heartburn, gassy fullness. Just eat 2 Tuins after meals—or whenever you feel upset. Turns neutralize excess acid almost before it starts. Can't over-alkalize. Always carry Turns in pocket or purse. Get a hiindy roll today! So economical —<wi/y 1 0 C i MEN WANTED Full or Part Time $54 a week. Work 6:30 p.m. —9:30 p.m. week nights. 2 • 5 p.m. Saturday. Silo — SI25 a week for full time men. Must own an automobile and be free of false pride. For personal inter- vi«w. bring your wife with you to Noble Hotel and call for R. A. Smith, Monday, October 31, at 3:00 and 7:00 p.m. If you are interested and cannot come for an interview, write R. A. Smith, Bernie, Missouri. OLDSIV1OBI Oli-h-h! What power! New Rin'kci T-330 power! . . . \Vliat smoothness! New JrtaiwY Hydra. Malic smoothm 1 *?! . . * \Vhat glamor! New Sttirfire. Styling! You'll say "0/i-/i-/i. r '' for -sure when you see OMa for "So! See them on "OH! Day" Nov. 3rd at your OLDSMOB1LE Dealer's! INSTALLATION On These Two New Deluxe Models GE NGES ELECTRIC COOKING IS CHEAPER An Average Family of Four Can Cook Electrically For Less Than 10< A DAY! Push Button Controls Automatic Oven Tinier Removable, Cairo! Cooking New "Focused Heal" Broiler * Full 36" Width * Extra Large Oven * Automatic "Speed" Cooking Change now to Electric Cooking and enjoy the Cleanest, Fastest Cooking ever New Farmers Terms Low Down Payment 259 Delivers and Installs In Your Home - Ready to Use JIMMIE EDWARDS * New High Speed Surface Units * New Calrod Bake Unit * No Stain Oven Vent * Three Large, roomy Storage Drawers Easy Charge Fuse Receptacle Exclusive GE Automatic Oven See Jimmie First For GE Appliances Delivers and Installs In Your Home-Ready to Use FURNITURE CO. 301 E. MAIN PHONE 2-2487

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