The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 18, 1944 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, May 18, 1944
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Page 3
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THURSDAY, MAY 18, 19-M 5 Scholarships HIGHLIGHTS FROJI LATEST BOOKS To Be : Graduates May Apply For One W Of Five Offered HELTON, Texas, May 18 - Announcement of five Fanm'e Brood- love Davis scholarships, to tie awarded for (lie Centennial year at Mary Haidin-Baylor College. Belton. Tc.s-., lias been made by Dr. Gordon G. Singleton, president of the college. One scholarship is to lie awarded to n 1944 high school Blrl graduate in the following states: Arizona. Arkansas. Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Tlic.se scholarships are being established to honor Mrs. Davis, a former Mary Harclin-Baylor student, who led in the organization of the Texas Woman's Missionary union in 1880, and who aided in the organization of the Southern Baptist Woman's Missionary union; and in appreciation of the Woman's Missionary union in tlio.se five southwestern states. In announcing tli e scholarships President Singleton pointed out. that since Mary-Hardtn-Baylor is the only senior baptist Woman's collegs in the southwest, the college is in a position to fully appreciate the great work of the W.M.U .. these states. la crganlzatioii in giving (he five scholarships the college is showing its appreciation for a former student, Fannie Breed - lov c Davis, and for the Woman's Missionary unions of the Southwest. Each scholarship amounts to $200 for the year 1544-45, and applicants must be graduates of accredited high schools in their states, according to the announcement. Applications are to be filed by June 15. 1344 . ly Brothers Of Boone Fami Serving In Army T1EADQUARTEBRS, EUROPEAN THEATER OP OPERATIONS: Daniel Boone is now In England as a first lieutenant in the Army 'transportation Corps at a united Slates general depot, pioneering the way for supplies from dock-side to depots and then to invasion troops. Lieutenant Boone, 21, of 708 West Main Street, Blytlicrllle, Ark,, it direct descendant of the famous pi- oncer is cue of nine brothers, five of whom are serving in the Army. His brothers, Second Lieut. David Boone, 21, and Pvt. William Boone, 23, are both stationed with the Air Corps in Florida. Pfc Howard Boone, 29, is a medical student at the University of Tennessee and Corp. Sanford Boone, 32, is with a Quartermaster Depot company, in..North., Africa., .Their , . nt Blylhcvillc. Lieutenant Boone entered the RLYTJIEVILLE (AUK.) COURIER WOWS Analyzes Balkans; Cites Co-Operation ..'S?™? 1 S..??T?. 1 . J !' l « M ?''?" D*"" 1111 " fw "w GcrroniM. author of "The Students of Spa- lalo" iDutlou: $2.76). and an authority on the Balkans, has written the following analysis of the possibility of Allied Invasion through Dial European sector. BY ISTVAN TAMAS The Nazis radio lias warned the German people that the zero hour )S at hand. The invasion Is coin- ins, and one thrust undoubtedly will be made against the Dalmatian coast, l r ive Adriatic Islands, Llssn, Ifvar, Melada, Brae and Curzola, have been tnkeit by Anglo-American commandos and Yugoslav guerrillas. They will be used as springboards for the main invasion for s. All these Important pre-inva MOD landings occurred around Spalnto (Split), the old toivn of the Honiiiii Emperor Diocletian. Spalato is a strategic stronghold en ihe Adriatic. Connected by rail with the hinterland, Spalato is linked with the best military highways, some built by the Roman Caesars and some by Napoleon. Spalato is the finest" and largest i;orl on ihe Adriatic. Heavy battleships antl, troopships can easily and safely anchor there. For this reason Ihe Nazis have fortified Spalato and use it as a base. The former Dalmatian port of Cnltaro was the base for Austrian-Hungarian navy nnd later was used by the Yugoslavs for the same purpose. Without being a prophet, but knowing the Dalmatian people,!can predict that an invasion through (lie Dalmatian coast winld be less costly than at any other point in "Fortress Europa." This will be true not only because Tito, as he claims, has 200,000 fighting guerrillas, nor because Mfkhnllovicli has 300,000 veteran soldiers and, ns he said, on the day of invasion can raise another 300,000—it will be (rue because. American - spirited Dalmatian courage will fight the Nazis on the very day of the Allied landing. The explanation is somewhat -U..M.U.U, i»..»uiii ,, ruiuu.iiiEu several vcars. I know tlipm well TpMn- Annie J ' B «"' e -' Uvfa T1 "*e people, descendant of. the surprising. After Hie .big Philoxcra "Invasion." which ruined the flourishing Dalmatian vineyards, the owners and farmers, becoming poor overnight, were forced to immigrate and seek their livlihootl outside the country. By. the thousands they migrated, mostly to America. Af-, ler 10 or 20 years, many thousands returned with a litlle money and started anew. Those American- Dalmatians brought not only money, but the spirit, the love of freedom, and (he democratic training of America. I lived among .these people for several years, i know them well. famous Illyrians, Ihe' aborigines of — "• "•'-• *•" \n- D a hi] R tin., lirp strori" ^t lihlinrn United States Army in June 194!. fibers. They will make, „They He is a graduate of Blytheville already hnvr a hell of n hniiHf il High SDiool, Murray Slnlc College,! - or a beautiful and studied law at the University of Kentucky. . Their fishermen have eiirrled on n (tarJiiB work with little iMrgcw, smuggling many thousands of wounded and other refugees from tile Dalmatian coast to iliu Ttallim port of liarl. 'Uiey know Hie Adriatic ns iheir own hands. This 1 people, the . believe the Dalmatian | OW n folk of 3»,i)nto, Dubrovnik and Sibeiilro will invaluable n) ( i to us, These people- are the yet unknown military fac- lor vvliicli will give a powerful swing to the Balkan invasion. HOOKS or OXFORD AKT UN1ERSITV PRPISS has just released n scrips of four booklets which reproduce some of the best paintings- on war subjects ever seen. These books, at $1.15 a set, have been made by some of (lie best nrtlsls in Britain, and show England ut war through the mediums of "Production," "Air Raids. "Women." and "Soldiers." Particularly Interesting Is the volume "Production." H could be produced only In'time at v,-.u; for the artists portray with grim seriousness W )i a e labor and industry, must do before victory Is assured. "Air Raids." is a rather tragic booklet—it portrays the horror and devastation brought to people nnd propertv through I lie air Mil/.. I Art is typically UritLsh. All foul- books are equally nt home in Ihe collection of a book worm or art, critic. * * • COMPTON MACKENZIE , done a superlative job of writing "Mr. Roosevelt." a biography of our President, and Button has" done a fine Job of printing this book in black nnd white and color illustrations. A S3.75 rolimie, it covers com- pletely the life of Franklin Bclano Roosevelt, his antecedents, and ht-s political career. Illustrations cover his complete Hie. Muckeiv/lv Is British, yet he Oi knows the Hooscvi'Jts from back, aim Is thoroughly to write this book. It Is one of (he best biographies ever written on otic of the biggest men of modern limes. « • • One of Ihe most interesting books on the human eye has been written by Ainj. Sidney A. Fox. former instructor at New' York University —"Your Eyes" (Knopf; $2.50). Ordinarily, books dealing with Irratlni! liodily Ills nre highly technical—not to tills book. Miijor Fox is downriisht plain spoken, some- limps humorously .so, in this volume, mid anyone wllh ylasscs or whu needs Ilii'm, would do ivell to read it. | "ihe millior covers (lip history of) eye treatment from as fur back as •iOOii tt. C.. and up to the newest wrinkle, Hip contact lens. Hint fil.s directly over (he eyeball; through the various diseases of the eye, and the physical factors llsal bring on far jnid near-sliihlcdnr-ss. e edge of the ,,. B v/, Ontario, nnd winds iij> after 11 •Ml Jaunt through l,ivk e Uvlcllo Hie rongors' ciuiip on Utke ProilRO. There Is plenty O f flsh- *> for speckled iind lake Irout Us Informallon on Ihc outll'ttlmj of a canoe' trip through (he bush, (or Ihc demrlpHcm of wildlife, for (ho reactions of two men on thnlr own for three weeks with nothing lo break the backwoods quiet ex- ci'pl crlbbuKe, trout, moon', and porcupines. 'llio book has n woodsy tang, and will tlpllghl any WnHonlan. Pa Heeded Soldier's Help More Than Uncle Sam Did Of all Ihc reasons given for a request for extension of furlough. section commanders of (h t BAAP nave never received one that topped, a recent plea. ,•-, "DcarCaptamr' .,«••!*•• Request extension of, furlough Pa Just .got.-3,000 baby, phicks^and wants me to slay home and help him build chicken coops ' - "- - roit JOHN D. HOUINS 1 "Incomplete Anglers" (Diietl. Sloan & Pcarce: S3) isn't so much a treatise on lishlni; practices us it is a good account of a trip through the Canadian north woods by canoe by two miirloor.smi'ii. liobins and his pal, Tom. The Hip begins at Radiant, on Energy-full "Vitamin Value the best of everything, for baking everyday Bring Thorn To Us—. The War Effort Needs Fots We Pay Ac and 2 Points For Pound! Pure—4 Ibs. 66c; 8 Ib. CARTON KIDNEY BEANS Joan of Arc Can 13* OYSTERS Gulf Kist Can <tffcdit Restrictions For Flood Sufferers Eased The usual consumer credit re strictiore regarding down payment, and instalment terms, contained in the Consumer Credit Regulation W of the Federal Reserve System were removed today for flood sufferers. In n statement issued today by the St. LouLs Reserve Bank, authority was given to merchants and lenders to extend consumer credit on any terms satisfactory to them providing such credit was for the sole purpose of repairing or replacing real or personal properly lost or destroyed as a result of the cm- rent Hoods. This easing of restrictions applies only to the Eighth Federal Reserve District, which includes all of Missouri, except the western tier of counties; southern Illinois and Indiana; western Tennessee and Ken- lucky; northern Mississippi and nil of Arkansas. ^Production of jjird (liis year i u JJfcxcted to exceed 3,000.000.000 pounds. EXSANA SOOTHING MEDICATED fOV/DER RetieVes sniarling torment Ortd covers wilh proTecling coat. Generous supply costs fifffa. TODAY CRITICAL APPETITES DEMAND 1 Rationed food necdi flavor brought cvl to rfi* tfmoif. Thal'i whera purefy vegfl- lablc HymKo carv h&!p you XOtt' roiNT-FHEE r- «_ untituim 1 fo* IIIIKO HERE TOM MX/ LOOKS LIKE A LETTER FROM YOUR. COUSIN 'BILL'-HOPE YOU HAVE BEEN WRiTWG HIM yOU BET I HAVE-WE ALL SHOULD MORE TO. OUR FRIENDS IN THE SERVICE/ LOOK MOM / — COUSI N BILL SAVS —"NEVER FELT BETTER THIS ARM/ SURE MARCHES.'ONA FULL STOMACH THATS GOOD / WE WANT OUR, ARMV TO HAVE TH£ BEST/ 'FOOD IS PRETTX IMPORTANT/ IT KEEPS US ALL IN FIGHTING TRIM-AND IF WE ALL SHARE - rtP WE CAN'.ALL HAVE WELL BALANCED MEALS—SO EAT LOTS OF. FRESH 'VEGETABLES 6- FRUITS 'AND' BREAD/ HuMKo COOKING TAT This Weekend's Specials 49$ ENRICHED '- with VITAMIN B-l OLD f ASHIONED SPICE CAKE. An ever-popular favorite FRENCH BREAD Baked Fresh Doily Hart's Bakery Blytheville Owned—Employing Blyllicville Peoplo JELLY Silver Tip 2 Ib Jar BROOMS Large Warehouse 50 DRIED FRUIT PRUNES, PEACHES 4PR/COTS ROLLED OATS 5 T6s. Jumbos 35* DRIED BEEF 25/2 Oz. Glass PORK BRAINS J0J4-0*. Can 16* FLY RIBBONS 4 Rolls In Box 10* ICE TEA 111JUC I'OUN!) DOG FOOD I'Aitn 2 CANS RITZ CKACKERS I.AK(,'K liOX Hot, .Isn't It? —Just laugh at the heat, like •other smart BlyfrtGvillo housewives ,. . Let our WAGON deliver your food . . . There is no extra charge! COFFEE NOVA 1 l.g. GLASS . CANOVA «r c HONEY 1-I'OUN I) «C< JAR Vrf CRACKERS 2 POUND I'rincos Krispy Premium .... QUART JAR tOc Gal. 17c QUART lOc BULK GALLON $|25 10 Lbs. 72c 5Lbs 38c GREEN'S PASTEURIZED, Qr. NECK BONES PORK BRAINS ib 25* PORK CHOPS ib PURE LARD VEAL ROAST Best Cuts VEAL STEW SALT MEAT Streak o' Lean HAMS Whole or Halt BACON In the Piece ib SLICED BACON Best Main H APPY 1JOUR GROCERY & JL iMAKKET Phone 814

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