The Oelwein Daily Register from Oelwein, Iowa on April 12, 1945 · Page 9
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The Oelwein Daily Register from Oelwein, Iowa · Page 9

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Oelwein, Iowa
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Thursday, April 12, 1945
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Page 9
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WEATHER Iowa -- Alostly cloudy tonight and F r i d a y with showers in west tonight and in cast Friday. Warmer in west and central portions tonight, cooler Friday afternoon. Full Leased Wire Report of TODAY'S Important Events of the World by Automatic Printer Service. VOL. 39.--NO. 90. OELWEIN, IOWA, THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 194V. -V- Shocked World Studies Effect of Tragedy As Nation Mourns War Chief WARM SPRINGS, Ga. -- UP --Franklin D. Roosevelt, president for 12 ol the momentous years m this country's history, died suddenly at 4:35 p m. (EWT) today in a small loom in the "Little White House" here. - Mr. Roosevelt had been in Waim Springs -- which he liked to call his "second home" -- since March 30. The week preceding he had spent at his home in Hyde Park, N Y . He was 63 years of age and had served as president longer than any othei American. With the president at the time of his death of cerebral hemorrhage was Comdr. Howard G. Bieunn and Vice Adm Ross T. Mclnlyre, the president's personal physician. News ol Mr. Roosevelt's death came from Secretary William D Hassctt He called in three press association reporters who had accompanied the president here and sa ; d' "It is my sad duty to inform you that tlhc President died at 3:3o (CWT) V of a ceiebral hemorrhage." Simultaneuolsy the news was telephoned to trie White House in Washington and announced there too In Washington, where the news of the president's death at first produced shocked disbelief, officials immediately wondered what eltect the tragedy would have on the- many domestic and international pi ejects the president was guiding. ' ' ' Whether it would cause postponement of the United Nations security conference at San Francisco remained to be seen. No one knew in the confusion ol the tiagic moment. But the conference was pel haps the project closest to the president's heart, and Iheie was some belief that in tribute to him the United Nations would carry ^it through He had planned to open the contcience m person -- to lay be- toic the United Nations his own ideas for world peace, p.. The president had spent a leis- --tu»ly two weeks in Warm Spungs. And at no time was there any indication that he was sick, beyond the tact that he had not made his usual visits to the Warm Swings swimming pool where in 1924 he began his life-long battle to overcome the withering eifects of infantile paralysis. Almost daily during his stay he took long automobile rides in. the soil Georgia spring sun and had been keeping up constantly with developments in Washington and abroad by telephone and through o l l i t i a l papers flown to him every morning. Mr. Roosevelt was the 32nd piesident ot the United States. Hib successor. Harry S. Truman who w.is expected to be sworn in momentarily, becomes the 32nd. T r u m a n received word of the president's death at 5:15 p. m., m his oflice. \ The president's death was announced in Washington by Stephen T Early ,his secretary and con- l i d c i n l c since he tirsl took of lice in 1933. Truman was called to the White House immediately and an emergency cabinet meeting was called. Mis. Roosevelt, Early and Admiral Mc-Intyrc, the pi Cbidcnl'b physician, arranged to leave lor W a i m Springs by plane immediately. The lour Roosevelt sons, all in the armed lorccs, were notified by t h e i r mother. She told them that the president had done his job to the end and that she knew he would want them to do likewise. Early said''the party will leave Warm Springs for Washington tomorrow morning by train Funeral services will be held Saturday ultcrnoon in the East room ol the White House. Bunal w i l l be at Hyde Park Sunday afternoon, he said. On April 5 the president conferred for a day with President Sertjio Osmena of Philippine commonwealth. He told Osmena that he hoped the Philippines independence would be restored far in advance of the congressional statutory date of July 4, 1946. At the conference with Osmena Mr. Roosevelt reaffirmed his firm i n t e n t i o n to sec that Japan and sell of her mandates would be un- rioi complete allied control and policing for an indefinite period a Per the war ends. The occasion of his meeting with Osmena on April 5 with the ast time the three wire service ·eporters accompanying the piesi- lent saw him to talk to for any ength ol time He was in gay spirits then and chatted lightly as he sat behind a paper-laden card table, waving us long cigaiet holder jauntily and wisecracking with the reporters. At the time the president had a good suntan, but his face was unusually drawn and there wa-s evidence ol a slight cough But he did not look or act like a man who was going to die in a week. This morning he followed hu usual routine ol handling paper work that had just arrived from Washington. Dr. Biuenn said that at 9.30 a. m (CWT) today the president was "in excellent spirits" and showed no evidence whatever of feeling badly .^ Shortly before 1 p. m (CWT) the piesident was sitting lor skcl- I ches to be made by an artist. i At about 1 o'clock the piesi- dent, according to Bruenn, suddenly complained o f ' a "veiy severe occipital headache." This is a headache in the back of the head. About 1.15 the president lost consciousness and Biuenn was with him by 1-30. v The president never regained consciousness and died without pain at 3'35. After his attack Bruenn had quickly called Adm.' Mclntyre in Washington'and Mclntyre in turn called Dr. James P Paulin ol t Atlanta, an internal medical spec- ' ialist and honorary consultant to the surgeon general Paulin rushed to Warm Springs and 'was with Bruenn and LI Cmdr George Fox in the president's bedroom when the chici executive died. In the Little White House, but not in the president's bedroom. , wcie two of his cousins who had been in Warm Spi ings with him. Miss Margaret Sucklcy and Miss Laura Delano, and also Grace Tully, the mesident's private secretary, and Hassctt The doctors described the cause of Mr. Roosevelt's death as a "massive cerebral hemmorhagc." The tiny community that makes up Warm Springs was plunged into gloom by the death of its literal patron saint The president had planned at 4'30 o'clock to have gone to the mountainside cottage of Frank Allcorn, the mayor of Warm Springs, for an old fashioned late afternoon barbequc. As the president died, country Tiddlers were on the mountainside by Allcorn's cottage testing out their violins and planning what they were going to play for him. j Because of war-time security governing his movements the public had''little knowledge of iust how much time the president was spending outside of Washington. As a matter of fact, his presence in Warm Springs had not been disclosed. The piesident went through a brutal fourth term campaign for a man ot his condition and age And nllhough early this year he mnr"c thr grueling trip to Yalta, he showed signs ot increasing weariness. His voice at press confei- ences was weak, and loose folds of skin under his chin were a barometer of the weight he had lost. Yet as far as the doctors could tell he suffered no a c t u a l oiganic ailmenls, although he was both- cicd almost constantly while in Washington by a chronic sinus condition which flared up occasionally with accompanying colds and bronchitis The president's death made DOS- siblc for the first time since Pearl Harbor the description of the heavily guarded lite he had led di'i-mg the war -- an existence which kept him surrounded by secret service agents and guards of the armed services. PRESIDENT FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Dad Died On Job, Eleanor Tells 4 Sons In Uniform WASHINGTON, D. C. --UP-To Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt to- ay fell the unhappy task of tell- ng her four sons in the armed ervices that their father was ead. White House Secretary Stephen '. Early said the sense of her message was that the president lipped away this afternoon. He did Tiis job to the end (the message said) as he would want ·ou to do. Bless you all and all ur love. Early said Mrs. Roosevelt signed her message, "Mother." The four Roosevelt sons, all of whom are in the service, were notified of the president's death by messages from Mrs. Roosevelt. She told them that the president had done his job to the end and that she knew he would want :hem to do so too. Mrs. Roosevelt, Early and Adm. Mclntyre, the president's physician, arranged to leave for Warm Springs by plane almost immediately. "We expect to leave Warm Springs tomorrow morning by train for Washington," Early said. "Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon in the east room of the white house. "Interment will be at Hyde Park Sunday afternoon. No detailed arrangements or exact times have been decided on as yet." Mr. Roosevelt had been president ! -12 years, one month and nine days. He took office March 4, 1933. Mr. Roosevelt apparently had been wearied by his long trip to Yalta. Despite his confident assurances to congress in a report on the Big Three meeting that he never felt better, old time newsmen noted new lines on his face. He went to Hyde Park twice for long week end rests in the weeks after his return from Yalta 7 P. M. EXTRA! Death Comes Suddenly At Warm Springs; Rites At White House Saturday WASHINGTON--UP--Franklin D. Roosevelt died today and Vice President Harry S. Truman met immediately at the white house with the late president's cabinet preliminary to taking- the oath as chief executive. Mr. Roosevelt died of cerebral hemorrhage at 3:35 p. m., CWT at Warm Spring, Ga'., his "second home." The president complained of a headache shortly after midday. Death came 2% hours later. The white house announcement said that the four Roosevelt boys in the service had been advised- by their mother of their father's death. The war president had served 12 years, one month and eight days in the white house. There probably had. not been a more exacting period in the history of the great office than that during which Mr. Pwoosevelt served. Mr. Truman "was summoned to the white Tiouse' Ltef'ore public announcement of Mr.Roosevelt's death. -, Stephen T. Early, white louse secretary, issued the ,'ollowij.ii!,- statement for Mr. British People Shocked At America's Tragedy -V- By PHIL AULT United Pi ess StafJ Correspondent LONDON --UP-- Gieat BiiUm icceivcd the news of President Roosevelt's death shortly before midnight ab a shock of staggering dcgice from Prime Minister Winston ^huichill's entourage to the man m the* sticet. The British public hcaid the news fiibl in the midnight news broadcast of the British Bioad- cdbtmg corporation and within a tew moments shocked Britons were telephoning the United Picss foi confirmation. Ameiican officeis and cnhblcd men in the west end night hie diblnct were among the f u s t to telephone The first enemy bioadcabt ol Iho news \v a b given by the Gci- man official DNB agency at 12'05 a. m. DNB bioadcabl the news without comment under an Amsterdam dateline, quoting a bioadcasl of the British information seivicc. The United Press telephoned the news to Prime Minister Winston Churchill's office bhoitly bc- loi e midnight. lie announcement in the United States. It was indicated that all cabinet minister*, and other key ministers in the government were urgently advised of the president's death. (The powerLul Ficnch station at Brazzaville, in tar-oft Atuca, broadcast the news at 0.15 p. m. Thursday EWT, interrupting its routine broadcast It gave the news ol the picsident's death without comment and added that Vice President H a i r y E. Truman vould succeed him as president The Brazzaville broadcast was i ccordcd by the United Pi ess in New York.) NO COMMENT FROM GERMANY LOSS TO ALL AMERICA :DEWEY ALBANY --UP-- Gov. Thomas E Dcwcy, 1944 republican presidential nominee, said late today that President Roosevelt's death will be "mourned by all of the freedom loving people of the entire world." Dcwey sent the following telegram to Mis. Roosevelt at the white house: "Please accept our deepest sympathy in your great loss which will be shared by every American and mourned by all of the freedom loving people of the entire world." The message was signed "Govi c i n o r and Mrs. Thomas E. Dewcy." Early Breaks News By Phone WASHINGTON, D. C. --UP-A little after 5.45 p. m. EWT today switch board lights glowed in press association offices here. A voice said "This is the White House. Hang on:" There was silence for several long moments. Then another voice said, "This is Steve Early." and then went to Warm Springs | white House Press Secretary March 29 for a moie extended | Stephen T. Early paused a mo- rest. Members of the cabinet began ariving at the white house within minutes after the announcement was made. ment Then he said. "Flash -- The President has died." That was at 5"48 p. m. EWT, April 12, 1945. 32nd U. S. PRESIDENT LONDON --UP-- The Gciman DNB .igency bioadcast the news of President Roosevelt's death without comment at 12 05 a m. today, under an Amsteidam date"Good lord 1 " the prime m i n i s - I ime, quoting a report of the Biit- His every movement--except lor a few politically expedient weeks in the last election campaign--was a secret as closely guarded as the movement of a battleship in enemy walers. No disclosure of his ;sctr. - ilics outside the White House was permitted until they were accomplished facts. During the last election campaign some of the president's critics, including some w i t h i n his own party, said he would not live out his fourth term. And hi. death today bore them out. tei'.s secretary exclaimed, horrified. He said he would telephone the prime mimslci at once. He added that Churchill might make no public statement until he told the news to the house of commons, to which he is olficial- ly responsible as adviser ol grave developments. Shortly before the announcement at Washington ol the president's de.ith the Daily Express mtormation service. -y Reaction of Churchill's Secretary Hoover's Statement NEW YORK -- UP -- Former Piesident Herbert Hoover s.nd to_ d.iy that the new ptcsident of the i United States will have the backing of the country and "While we mourn Mr. Roosevelt's death, we .shall march forward" Hoover said m a statement: LONDON--UP--Prime Mimstci ' "The nation sorrows at the diplomatic correspondent wrote ' Winston Churchill's secretary, in- parsing of its president. Whatever that news of such importance was i formed by, the United Press late d i f f e i c n c c s there may have been, teaching the government that ' tonight of President Roosevelt's | they end in the regrets of death, politicians were discussing the ' death, exclaimed "Good lord!" He i It is foi lunate that in this great possibility of an early announce- said he would advise the prime | crisis of war our aimies and na- ment of Germany's collapse. Jt appeared, however, that the news might have been 'that of the p'-e.sident's death, sent to an allied government even before the pub- mimstcr at once but did not ex- i vies are under such magnificent pcct a public statement until Churchill made :\ formal .statement in the house Of commons piobably tomorrow. leadership that we shall not hesitate. While we mourn Mr. Roosevelt's death, we shall march forward." Vice President Harry S. Truman, before taking: the oath of office as 32nd president of the United States, announced today that he had a.lked the late Franklin D. Roosevelt's cabinet to remain in office. Truman asked Chief Justice Ilarlan Fiskc Stone to swear him m at the White House. '·Foi' the time beinjr," he said, "T prefer not to hold a press conference. It will be my effort to carry on as I believe the president would have done and to that end I have asked the cabinet to stay on with me." Truman: "For the time being I prater not to hold a press conference. It vill be my effort to carry on as believe the president would have done and to that end I have asked the cabinet to stay on." Mr. Roosevelt was 63 years old, tired by the burdens of a war presidency. Mr. Truman will be 51 years old May 8 of this year. Mr. Roosevelt died at 4:35 p. m. EWT The new president was sworn m at 7:08 p. m., EWT. Mr. Roosevelt had served 12 years, one month and eight days of the unprecedented four terms o which he had been elected. Mr. Truman had served as vice president since a few minutes after noon, EWT last aJn. 20. The oath was administered to Mr Truman by Chief Justice Harlan F. Stone m a brief ceremony in the cabinet room of the White House. Witnesses included the cabinet, whom Uhe new president asked to remain m office, and other top ranking government officials. Truman picked up a Bible resting on the end of the big conference table, held it with one hand, and placed his right hand on top while Justice Stone pronounced the oath fiom memory. Truman repeated tiie oats, after him. Justice Stone pressed his hand. Members of the cabinet were firnked around Truman and the justice during the ceremony., which took no more than a minute. Standing behind Truman was his wile, whose eyes were tear stained. Members ot the White House statf---secretaries and stenograph- el s--some ot them with tear stained eyes, stood silently in the three doorways of the cabinet room and watched President Roosevelt's successor sworn in. Mi Roosevelt's funeral will be held Saturday afternoon in the g'eat East Room of the White Houhe. There the late president has appeal od on countless occasions to gieet guests before his formal state dinner and met them later for mubic. He will be buried Sunday afternoon at Hyde Park--the place on the banks of the Hudson he ically loved. The dearest role to rrankhn Delano Roosevelt was that of county squire. There will be no successor as vice president to Mr. Truman. In the event of his death a statute provides that he would be succeeded by the secretary of state, in this instance Stettinium. NEW YORK -- UP -- The National Broadcasting Company announced tonight the cancellation' of all its regularly scheduled programs because of the death ot President Roosevelt. H ' v f

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