Independent Star-News from Pasadena, California on October 29, 1961 · Page 96
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Independent Star-News from Pasadena, California · Page 96

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Location:
Pasadena, California
Issue Date:
Sunday, October 29, 1961
Page:
Page 96
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£..«#-^V. All it takes is a whiff of Swift's. Premium Bacon and bacon-snitchers come from miles around. Brown-sugar cured! Tempting sweet-smoke taste! With plenty .of energy and high-quality meat protein! Can you imagine passing-it-by? No one has that much will power! The two most trusted words in meal. Our 106th year. LOLA A cold -wind has made her at the box office by LLOYD SHEARER T AST YEAR a small, independent mo- J--J tion picture outfit, Troy Productions, turned out a film called A Cold Wind in August in 15 days for $163,000. It told the story of a strip teaser and her destruction as a beautiful, mature woman by a 17-ycar-oId boy. The two men who owned Troy Productions were so strapped for ready cash in June 1960 that they sold their film to United Artists for $200,000. Not knowing what to do with the picture, not knowing if it was really any Rood, United Artists sat on it until a fcw'months ago when it began releasing the film in Europe, am! North America without any advance trumpeting. Although it deals with a seamy, seedy, sexy side of life, Cold Wind in August is probably the best treatment of a youth's-affair with an older woman Hollywood has ever produced. It has none of the unrealistic gloss and phony polish of Goodbye Again with Ingrid Bergman, Anthony Perkins and Yves Montand, a film which cost $2,500,000 and is based on the same theme. What it does offer is a fidelity to life which is valid-from both the male and female points of view as well as from the audience's. What gives the film its basic enthralling power is the acting of Lola Albright, 36, a blue-eyed blonde from Akron, Ohio, who has been wandering in the Hollywood jungle for so many years she's lost count. The Janitor's Soy In Colt! Wind hi August I.ola portrays Iris Hartford, a 28-year-old burlesque queen. Because of the social stigma which accompanies her profession, Iris tries to get away and lead a normal life for three summer months each year in her New York apartment. To this apartment, to fix her air conditioner, the janitor sends his 17-year- old son, Vito (Scott Marlowe). He is dark, slim, a young Florentine glistening and bursting witb sexuality. Because of her previously countless, unsatisfactory relationships with men, Iris is thrilled by a young man's contemplation of her--not as Beryl Cobalt, the burlesque queen, but as iris Hartford, tht 1 woman. Sun* from A Cold Wind in Augutt (right) shows Lola Albright as seniuous strip-teaser with Scott Marlowe. Above: Lola os herself. Their affair begins, and Iris realizes that for the first time in her life she completely in 'love, completely dependent on a man. At this point she returns to a New Jersey burlesque house for one-week appearance, and the inevitable happens. Vito sees her on stage, is filled with mounting jealousy, accuses her of betrayal. His illusion of her as a "madonna" vanishes. Reverting to her usual performance with lust-driven men, Iris t a u n t s and reviles the finally leaves her--alone. The film is excellent because Lola Albright makes it so. Her behavior is credible, her reactions entirely applicable to an older woman totally and desperately in love with a young buck. Her controlled revelation of animal passion, her demonstration of pathos, her pcrceplivencss of the chemistry of the man-woman relationship stamp her as one of the film colony's most talented and heretofore neglected actresses. It is sad to say that Lola Albright has been in Hollywood since 1946, and in all those 1 5 years has been given only two good parts--one in Champion with Kirk Douglas in 1948,' the other one in Cold Wind which she finished in Starch 1960. What it proves, of course, is that Hollywood producers arc no judges of acting talent -- which almost everyone here has known since 1 9 1 1 . Lola Jean Albright entered show business almost 20 years ago. After a dozen years of studying piano she went Pomelo · Ocr. y, 1961

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