The Camden News from Camden, Arkansas on June 29, 1972 · Page 40
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The Camden News from Camden, Arkansas · Page 40

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Camden, Arkansas
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Thursday, June 29, 1972
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Page 40
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201 — Comdse (Ark.) Comden New» — TKwrtòoy, Jvm« 29 ,1972 Cold Water Controls Growth Of Fish WINTHROP. Wash (AP) If you're a rainbow trout at the U S hatchery here you need a sweater, but down river at Wells Dam it's bikini weather for the Steelhead and salmon. The reason is that fisheries experts are lowering and raising water temperatures in order to control growth The goal is to keep fishermen happy by supplying them with plenty of fish of the right size at the right time The refrigeration system at the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery will drop the temperature of the water in which rainbow eggs lie to 38 degrees from about 47 Cooler water slows down the metabolism of the eggs so they will hatch later Tom Sheldrake, assistant manager of the hatchery, said state and federal hatcheries which the Winthrop facility supplies have asked for delivery of eggs that will assure eight-inch fish at specified times The refrigeration process en ables the hatchery to delay the fish from reaching the release stage by 90 days. Sheldrake said Egg-taking from the adult fish in the outdoor holding ponds starts in January ant generally runs through March Sheldrake said The fish usually reach the eight-inch size in 14 to IS months. The first batches-about 750,* 000 eggs—ar* retained here, some to be released as finger lings in Indian Reservation lakes and streams, others to be planted as eight -inchers in Met how Valley streams Another five million eggs are used to meet the needs of other states and hatcheries overseas These are the ones to be refrig erated The refrigeration system to delay egg-hatching will be much cheaper than delaying actual fish growth by cooling the water in the holding ponds, Sheldrake said Meanwhile, at Wells Dam they're warming up the water so the salmon eggs will hatch about the same time. By heating the water, the time it takes to hatch salmon eggs and bring the fish to feed stage can be shortened by as much as a month The hatchery handles about four million salmon eggs a year and about 750.000 steelhead eggs for release into area waters KAMD Opened In ’46 Radio station KAMD has been serving the Camden listening area since it aired its first program, June 19, 194«, with 290 watts. Today the station is powered by 5000 watts and serves a listening area which includes, Hot Springs, El Dorado and Monroe, La. KAMD is an affiliate of the Mutual Broadcasting System, the Arkansas Sports Network and the Astro Baseball Network. It’s format includes local and national news, sports and country-western music. Religious music is also a part of the regular daily schedule. KAMD is managed by Donald Cathey and employs a staff of six. It airs daily from 5:30 a.m. until 11:05 p.m. Refinery Aids In « Are Prosperity KAMD — SMACKOVER - The Henry H Cross Oil and Refining Co , established in 1923 by George F Fox of Chicago, 111. is the oldest industry in Smackover in continuous operation I! has contributed much to the prosperity of Smackover and is one of its largest employers with 55 em ployees 'Die refinery was purchased on Jan 1. 1960 by Charles J Wood and Associates of Chicago and a program of modernization has been carried out over the years, with the plant being almost completely rebuilt. Wood purchased the interest of his associates soon after he took over operation of the refinery. Cross Oil is currently interested in lending its resources to the secondary recovery of depleted heavy oil sand and is also interested m the production of oil. One of the improvements completed in early 1971 was the installation of an auxiliary crude distillation unit for increased crude capacity. The plant is now in the process of reconstructing the lube loading tracks and asphalt loading tracks, changing the Mo- Fac rails and ties and placing new ballast under the ties, Doyle Terrell, plant superintendent, said Another innovation is installation of a metal lunch room building for its employees. The building is located adjacent to the entrance road west of the refinery This is the beginning of a relocation program designed to centralize the maintenance and warehousing operations at the west end of the refinery. Engineering plans are nearing completion for construction of 50 by 100 foot metal building which will house a welding shop, electrical equipment and instrument repair shop, supply room and machine shop A plant-wide communication system has recently been completed which has greatly improved operational efficiency. A new sign erected marks the plant entrance on Sixth street. It estimated that 4,500 trucks transport loads of crude oil and finished petroleum products will pass through these portals during the year of 1972. Terrell stated With the addition of hydrogen treating facilities for treatment of lubricating oils, the Cross Co now ranks first in lube oil manufacture among the six plants located in Arkansas The refinery also makes asphalt, gas oil, naptha, diesel fuel and several different streams of lube oil for blending with other types of material N. R Price, former superintendent of the refinery, resigned effective, March 1, as vice president of the Cross Oil and Refining Co. to become president of the Cross Development Co in Arkansas with offices located at 108 East 8th Street in Smackover. IS MORE THAN JUST A WORD AT Camden Furniture Co. New Shopping Mart Well On Schedule The construction of the new multimillion-dollar shopping center in the 2400 block of North West Avenue, just south of the Arkansas Power L Light Building, is well on schedule, according to Harold C Yelverton of Lubbock, Tex., developer of the project The facility, to be known as the Mellor Park Mall Shopping Center, will embrace more than 30 acres including 19 acres for parking, making it the largest such center within a radius of 75 miles The 933-foot by 300 -fool building will include a com pletely enclosed and air- conditioned Mall 30 feet wide, 430 feet long, and with a 16-foot ceiling, Yelverton said The asphalt-paved parking area will accommodate more than 1,400 cars. Target date for completion of construction is in early 1973, the owner said A recently announced expansion by Belk-Jones Department Store has enlarged Its leased space from 38,400 square feet to 48,400 square feet. E. M. Jones, executive vice president of the firm, said the 10 , 000 -foot expansion of its space was tetimony to the confidence of the Belk Jones board of directors in the future economic growth at El Dorado as a major regional shopping center The extensive Mellor Park Building, which will accommodate more than 20 stores and shops, has already been leased by seven more firms as follows: Woolco Department Store (a subsidiary of F W Wool worth Co.), 81,700 sq ft; Kroger Super Market, 25,900 sq. ft., Super-X Drug, 12,450 sq ft ; El Dorado House, 3,650 sq ft.; Cliff's Men's Store, 2,200 sq ft.; Exchange Bank and Trust Co., 1,250 sq ft The total of about 158,000 aq ft. already leased leaves approximately 64,000 sq. ft. available, Yelverton stated Negotiations are invited for firms in the categories of shoes, junior department stores, stamp redemption centers, beauty shops, a twin cinema, and a cafeteria The amount of new business to be attracted to El Dorado because of the modem center has been estimated at 15 to 18 million dollars annually. The number of people to be regularly employed, about 440, will make thia project the fourth largest employer in Union County, Yelverton said. The annual payroll is estimated at about two million dollars. Financing of the large development comes from an Arkansas firm, First Federal Savings of Pine Bluff. Executive for the account is, Howard Weichern, vice president « MATfMW lOTMBT, Jft. P im M wii I T cmww «. Green Berets Fight For Unit Existence By HUBERT J. ERB Associated Press Writer BAD TOELZ, Germany (AP) — American Special Forces, their green berets bloodied and somewhat discolored from twilight warfare in Southeast Asia, now are fighting for their unit existence. Down from a peak of about 7,000 men to some 3,000, they will be cut further. Among those left will be a detachment at Bad Toelz in southern Germany. It was in Germany where the dream of the men in the Green Berets was first conceived, combining the stealth of the wartime American Office of Strategic Services—OSS—and the daring bravado of Otto Skorzeny’s German Special Commandoes. Here in the foothills of the Alps, the Special Forces Detachment Airborne Europe numbers 305 officers and men. They are housed in s compound built by the Nazis as a training school for SS elite guard combat officers. The commander of Detachment Europe is Col. Ludwig Faistenhammer Jr., 47. An ex­ college boxer, he was born in nearby Munich and immigrated to the United States with his parents when he was a young boy An enlisted man in World War II fighting against the Germans, Faistenhammer has made a career of being a Green Beret with wide experience in Southeast Asia. “We are an elite,” Faisten­ hammer said in an interview, "and we have no problem with the local community. No dope. No incidents. No long hair, I tell the men, 'You don’t like it here? Then out ’ Those that f ■ .....—--------------- stay are the best men in the Army.” Pride, even chauvinism, long has been the mark of Special Forces men, even while their now symbolic green berets were against regulations, worn only in the backwoods country around Fort Bragg, N.C., when the Regular Army was not looking. The 10th Special Forces Group Airborne came into being in 1952 at the height of the Korean War, put together from volunteers from all across the Army. But they languished out of the public eye for years until John F. Kennedy became president. He looked them over, liked what he saw and their fortunes boomed. Already in 1959, they began special operations in Vietnam and Laos, beginning an association with the Central Intelligence Agency— CIA—that later would cost the Special Forces image dearly. Their Vietnam scandal—the alleged execution of a Vietnamese double agent—cost the Green Berets notoriety around the world, signalling the eclipse of their once-favored position. Special Forces was first organized by Col. Aaron Bank, something of a legend among the men who joined the original 10th. Bank combined the infil* t r a t i o n concept—and intelligence role—of the World War II OSS with the combat capability of the German Spe- cail Commandoes of Col. Otto Skorzeny. The men Bank gathered about him were a mixture of soldier-adventurers, men eager to leave the more humdrum duty of regular line units, opportunists, the curious, ex-OSS sgents from Europe, China and other war-time theaters. It was for Europe, in the era of East-West confrontation, that Special Forces was organized— commando specialists and guerrilla organisers tor possible use in suppressed countries. Vietnam became an unexpected interlude. Subsequent probes into Africa and South America broadened the oppprtunity tor experience as Special Forces searched—and still searches for s lasting role even in peacetime. While the men of the Green Beret based in Europe concen- trste on the future far from the jungle heat they fought In for the past decade, it is Vietnam, as it is for the entire Army, that remains their special trauma. Special Forces puts its killed in Southeast Asia at more than 700, with many more wounded. Col. Faistenhammer and his sergeant major, John F. Pio- letti of Fayettville, N.C., are typical: Each has served three tours in Vietnam or Laos; each was wounded in Vietnam. There is a wood-carved memorial to the Green Beret dead in Faistenhammer’s headquarters. He tells newcomers to the outfit that he expects them to be worthy of those who went before. While Special Forces is being cut back, the appeal of the Green Berets remslns THEY EAT TOO MUCH BONN, Germany (AP) — One of every four West Germans believes he is esting improperly, according to a survey by the Bonn Health Ministry. Twenty-four per cent of those queried thought they were not getting full nutritions! benefit from their meals because they were eating too much, too quickly and at the wrong times Founded in 1926, Camden Furniture it one of the oldest firms in the area. The number of employees has jumped from a total of 40 in 1926, to 250 in 1972. Their products are distributed all over the United States with annual sales of $4.5 million. MANUFACTURERS OF HUE BEDROOM FURNITURE SINCE

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