The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 24, 1932 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, October 24, 1932
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Page 2
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.MONDAY.J3CTOBEK 24, -1932 .ULYTHEVILLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS ICT HEBBOTTOIE ILSJIESIIW — i But Roosevelt's Mother We-Id 'Be Proud to See Him Elected. Roosevelt and His Mother-Inl894 and 1932 Hi' JU.IA KI.ANSHARD SEA Service Wrller HYDE PARK. X. Y.—Mrs. Sara Delano Hoc=5vell Is one mother vdo never rais:d her son to be PK^Idene. Years ago, when Franklin visited the While lion" »'Wh his parents and President Cbvelund gravely told the lad that he sincerely hoped lie never would he president or the united Stales. Mr. and Mrs. Floossvcli £ad a good laugh over it. "That was quite the last thins Franklin's father or I should have thought o f then." Mrj. Roos?v?lt told me. "Right at that time Franklin's chief ambition WE.S to »j u se when he grew tip. Admiral Nelson was his lisro. Instead of the usual little boy's Jcslrc lo IM a ttreel car conductor, our son wanted to be captain of a big ship and j . £ail the seven seas." | . Answers Hundreds of Congratulations Sitting by the huge fireplace in the enormous living room of the Rcoseveit family home here, Mrs. HocssveU laid aside the hundreds of, congratulatory letters she has been answering ever since her son was nominated, lo reminisce about Ills childhood. Mrs. Roosevelt, who may become one of the few women in American history who have sJ' 1 ! their sous in the While House, still believes that children pud tee home nre women's thief concern ant- their greatest happiness. Recalls Son's I.ovr- For Water Sports It was a lonely boyhood, In n way tliat she described as Having bc;n that of the Democratic presidential candidate's. Only child of wealthy parents, barn in this huge, sprawling stone mansion, wiih its j" rooms and acres of \v(xxls. hills and cultivated fields, the boy Franklin played most of the time with ti= setter dog, "Marksman," an3 his l)cny. "D^bby," named for his favorite aunt. "He was a happy, contented, out- of-doors boy." Mrs. Roosevelt described his early years. "He war en.-y to bring' up because, though strong-willed, he was not obstinate and was too intelligent ever to be troublesome. We never really had to punish him." , Pa;rio[iately fond .of. the 'Water x Frnnklis roirecl on;"" thb "Hudson *\viili his father and swam, fished and took trips on the water every chnncc he got, whether here or abroad with his parents.- Pursued Hobbies Enthusiastically "At eight Franklin started collecting stamps." his mother reminisced. "In his thorough fashion he read teoks and studied the subject and sotted and mounted his stamp; with such care that his collection is very valuable today. "At 12 he changed hobbies when his father gave him a gun for hi' Christmas. He studied birds and their haunis and habits and hi shot and mounted a very inclusive collection ol birds native to thi; part of the country. We still keer it intact, in his old room. "I guess in many ways we ncv-. cr kncvv the difficulties modern parents know," Mrs. Roosevelt admitted frankly. "There was no question, for instance, of" koepinr Franklin from going to bad movie*in. Poughkeepsic, for there -wcren'l any movies, gocd or bad." Has Busy Life Mutter, at '7, Still This frankness seems part an-' parcel of Mrs. Roosevelt's character. Just as she bDasts of h?r T years, though she looks mucr younger. Just as she aimits that sr.e takes no active part in the running of her huge house but makes it her first duty and pleasure tc be sure that everything us alwajv ready for Franklin or h!s family'r return. Forty friends asd relatives ^ including the Governor, svcre in the house on a recent week-end During tlic week, when she is alone Mrs. Roossvelt .spends some timr 'n her garden, some working for charities, the rest writing in lour hand lo her friends and her son's well-wishers. Tall, erect in bearing, broad- shouldered nnd well-built in face and form, she and her ,=on arc much alike. H:r brown eyes under her snony l )a ir are steady, critical reflective. She has all the dignity and slatplinjss of another age. plus a vitality that gives the impression ol tremendous psr.sonal power. "I had some doubt that my son would b» nominated." she admitted. -BU! now- that he is running. ! f»c! conflient that he will be elected. And I am proud." ID FftCE HII Killer of Aged Father-in- Law May Face Court Tuesday. OSCEOI.A, Ark., Oct. 24-Clr- ctilt court convened here tills morning for the second week of PAGE THREE Church of (Ud to Contuse Revival The revival services at the church or God, on Etit Cherry between 'irst nnd Second streets, will con!n« each night this week except Saturday, The Hcv. Orln n. Mungcr, trav- •llng evangelist, Is In charge of the ncettng. Entertain At Brldje. Mrs. Hajinoinl Essnry nnd Mrs, Chester Cnldwell were hostesses the defendant * white ix/mun.; Dint one, tlie case of Hobeit Nel-1. Autumn leaves filled the MOTHER AX]> SON—1894 Franklin Roosevelt was K years old when he posed «ilh liis mollicr for thJs portrait. MOTHKK AND SON— I93Z A new and exclusive picture of the Di-nicu-nitic nominee and his mother today. ,, Nelson.' wins, mother lived In I".!.'. lil ' CO] " 1 T" 1 ', a the Ciosncll community, will plead; '' Wl " ™' ''* Mrs - J sell defense to the chnrge. Jlc is , 'V *M ""' represented by nltorm-y Bruce Ivy " bll< ' 1 ' Mrf ' Mtm * of Osi-colii. Tlic filial shoolliiB grew mil of Nelson's refusal to pull corn In Ills fgthw-l|i-)nw's cruii on Sunday, according to his conlentlcn. Tlic quarrel took pluce 0:1 tin.- i>orch of (lie oldw man's shnnty boat home and when In' stepped Inside nnd took u shut gun (town from Its rack over the [lour nnd threatened to kill Nelson, NeUun stiol him with tils pistol, according to Nelson's story. There were no eye witness to Ih? ihcotlng. Just a Fellow Who Likes Cold Weather Children's Coughs Need Creomulsion AV»y« gt* the bcft, fastest and surest u m n n ' for your child's cough or "id. Prudent mothers more ami moro °re Joining t 0 Creomulsion for SOT «ugh or cold that ttMls. .V-rromulsJon cmuljifiw creosote with fii other important medicinal clement* *!»<* soothe and heal the infUmod mmbranni andchrck gem gr<mth. It is Ml a cheap remedy, hut contain, no narcotLcj an,|.i, mt , in relic f. O, a t«Ulo from Eight Divorce Actions Filed Saturday and Today Eight divorce actions were filed in chancery court here Siilurday nnd lod.iy. Ainung the suits filed was an action brought by Mrs. Christine I'urvls of this city seeking divorce from Hubert rurvis. The suit wns filed through j-\ c. Douglas, locdl attorney. Four .suits wcro filed through Alexander mid Cooper, local law firm, They arc: Kathleen Parker vs. Harry Parker, E. c. Thompson vs. Nellie Thompson. Thelimi Buckner vs. Gus Buckncr and Mabel Strlcklln. vs. J, C. Strlck- lin. Other actions filed were nnd Jackson vs. fhronic Jackson, Elizabeth Wilson vs. Fuller F. Wilson and a. S. Thompson vs. Mertie Thompson. All were brought through R. S, Hudson. Manila attorney. Archbishops and bishops ol l!w established church arc permitted seals in the British House of Lords. bath ! Trlescli- prcsr-med - . .... - , Slum I. Tunu flsli Biilud was wrvt'd will: plclili'.s-. Jinn ciike, cmmiKS iui< cotf.ce. * * * Iliislnrss \Vcmcn Tn Huve Study l.'ciur.be. Members of the Business am Profr-ssloiml Women's elulj will luive n lesson In (heir sludv course Ionium, 7:30 o'clock, at the Ooll linlfl. "Tlx' United Slates ,\s a Fur Hung Kiuplrc" Is to be ilud- Icd with Mlhs Mninlc Louise r-.d- wnrds ns lender. Booneville Pa«tor to Preach Here This Week ot a The Rev.. Harold Nance, Doonevllle, Mo., will conduct week, of special services at the I- Street Methodist church this week with services each night at 1:30 o'clock. Tonight's subject will be "Going Out." Read Courier News Want Ads. Spliflinq Headaches There arc about 3000 wood tics ' movie to a mile of railroad truck, nuc/.. uclrcsS| |s of Poln A|)))olll ,| n . i1 -'«. n ".-vwi»l'l<.;la««ivcbroiiiihicfjkkrelitl OulckrcIkE for RCK! lixliwt- tkin. hejithum.Oiily inc. When winter v;inds start whipping ' through .your clothes give ri thought to Moro, pastime is crawling Into an ice cafce for an; unmolested - siesta. 'The "Humnn Iceberg" ing examined, by doctors after .having spent .30 minutes . frozen .in, an ice cake. tection against the -cold affect him. not at, all. Moro, whose - feat of catalepsy . , . , galoshes -.and car muffs just like the rest of us when wintry winds howl. whose favorite is shown be- No air, and no pro-" baffles' doctors, wears New Discovery Reaches Cause of Stomach Gas Dr. Cnrl found that poisons In the .UPPER bowel causo stomach yas. His simple remedy Aditrika ivasJics out llio upper bowel,' bring- in? out ull gas. City Drug Store. w-8 . . _Adv. There's Plenty of t • New Life New Stylfe New Service In your hat when il is rebuilt by our factory method.. -For the piico of an ordinary cleaning nntl blocking job \v« can restore your old hut to its former good condition. Guaranteed Workmanship Combined With Good Service Phone 180 BARNES' NU-WA CLEANERS We Give Prosperity Coins Society— Personal j critically ill nt the horns of his'] is visiting in Wynne, and were \ sister, Mrs. C.'B. Pcrrln,.Mr. Sem-• guests for the dny of Mr. and jmes, who came hero from n .Mem- j Jlrs. A. VV. Young. Judge Kli- The Osceola Democratic Womens club will entertain with a benefit bridge party in-the Progressive club rooms at the court house here on Wednesday afternoon, November 2. A number ol prizes will ta awarded and proceeds will go lo the Riis- evelt-Garner campaign fund. Reservations may be nude with Mrs. L. D. Masscy, Mrs. W. E. Huntor Mrs. w. R. Dyess. Mrs. J. L. members of her Ward entertained two table club Friday afternoon. Besides the club members Mrs. Hale Jackson and Mrs, P. J. Semnie-s jr. were gu^ts. High score was awarded Mrs. JCe Cromcr. . | - * * i Mrs. Hugh D. Tomlinson of St. ! Louis joined Mr. Tomlinson here' for the week-end. They were amcng j several Osceolans who attended the ! football game in Memphis Sunday, 'the number also including Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. James Driver, Mr. and Mrs. Hale Jackson, Ben Butler, Hugh Diliahunty. and W. P. Quinn. Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Semmes and smalt son, Tidwell, of Morriltou. • si>ent the week-end in Osceola with j relatives. Mr. Scmmes came to be with his brother, Frank Sem- ' mes, of Tuscumbia, Ala., who is': CASH FOR OLD GOLD CASH sent to you, by return mail, for anything containing GOLD ; —CASH for out-of-style je\v- j dry, rings, gold teeth, watch cases, etc. Mail in articles now Money-Order by return mail THE GOLD EXCHANGE San Antonio, Texas "Add to Uncle Sam's GOLD Reserve" phis hospital several weeks ago, improved .considerably, but within Hie last feiv days hns become much worse, and is not expected lo recover^ Robert Murphy has returned to San Antonio, Texas, where he is a student at Randolph Field, afler a short visit, with .his sister. Mrs. Bruce Ivy and Mr. Ivy in Osceola. Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Shippen and small son. Billie. oi Cairo, III., spent the week-end with relatives and friends here. Mrs. Neil Kitlcii?h a\id Mrs. Marcus Feitz of Wynne, joined Judge Killough and ;ur. Fc-itz, here Wynne after adjournment ol court 'ough Is presiding at circuit court this term and Mr. Feitz is court, reporter. Head Courier News Want Ads. Friday night. They were accompanied by Mr. Feltz's mother, Mrs. F. W. Feitz of Auburn, Ind., who AT THE FIRST SNEEZE USE Mistbl tmmmv * ^ *^ PUT Essence of Mistol ON YOUR HANDKERCHIEF AND PILLOW IT'S NEW ^BARGAIN Just received from factory, one com. plctely rebuilt Premier Duplex Ball Bearing- Electric, Sweeper. This sweeper guaranteed like new in every way. Bargains on attachments for any cleaner. Heffnpr Electric Service Phone 680 Frank Heffner o/o Gillen Furniture Co. ... it's a treat for lean budgets .. HART SCHAFFNER & MARX GIVE YOU 72 OF LAST SPRING'S S 65 to $ ?5 BENCH TAILORED DETAILS IN GREATER VALUE FALL SUITS AND TOPCOATS for $ 24 50 NEW MEAD CLOTHING CO.

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