Skip to main content
The largest online newspaper archive
A Publisher Extra® Newspaper

The Springfield News-Leader from Springfield, Missouri • 12

Location:
Springfield, Missouri
Issue Date:
Page:
12
Extracted Article Text (OCR)

12 st- frtn-ingftriaMoBaUsSrniBjpor Full-Time Use Santa Peace (CONTINUED FBOM PACK ONE) on Christmas night Schools and Theaters Join to Benefit Both Dorothy Manners HOLLYWOOD HofctVWOGD As the All-1 he helped make a big one. American footballers again take Elvis Presley: Top man of the "the field in the Big Bowl games I nightclub circuit, the one-man director and producer of off-Broadway plays, David Young. recently broken for the building which is estimated to cost about $2.5 million, part of which is being raised by the school, "Building the theatre in a school solves not only the prob- By VIVIAN BROWN AP Newsfeatures Writer Schools and theatres might join forces to solve the problems of high-cost construction and maintenance, giving a building! full time use rather than long; darkened periods, says Ann T. Roberts of Hartford, Conn. She has just made such a cooperative venture possible by providing a grant of $1.5 million from a foundation established in their names by her late husband, Ed-1 ward, the son of a former gover- nor of Connecticut.

Students of Kingswood school in West Hartford which has just merged with the Oxford school, and a 37-year-old near-profes-s i a 1 130-member theatre group. The Mark Twain Masquers, will share a new science and arts building for their respective interests. Ground was It. i Afteciated Press Wlrepholn (iroundbreaker Ann Roberts, 73, scoops up the first shovel of dirt at the site of the Edward C. and Ann T.

Roberts Science and Arts Building in a unique combination of theater and school. at the end of the season, it is once more for our selection of performers who by force of personality or outstanding talent rate All-American recognition on our Hollywood score card. For adding to the color and general excitement of the entertainment world during 1970, we salute: Quarterback: George C. Scott Halfback: Albert Finney Halfback: James Earl Jones Fullback: Jack Nicholson Left End: Glenda Jackson Left Tackle; Robert Young Left Guard: Carrie Snodgress Center: David Frost Right Guard: Peter Boyle Right Tackle: Elvis Presley Right End: Frank Langella pe i a 1 1 y- learn: All McGraw and Ryan O'Neal in "Love Story." Point after touchdown: Melvin Douglas for I Never Sang for My Father" Cheerleader: Flip Wilson Coach: Ross Hunter Georse C. Scott: For his spine-tingling performance as the spine-tingling General Albert Finney: A sheer delisht in a too familiar role.

"Scrooge" James Earl Jones: Did the next to impossible, made his screen interpretation of the Big Black Fight Champion more smashing than when played the same part on Broadway in "The Great White Jack Nicholson: The acting surprise of "Easy Rider" becomes the stellar surprise and favorite new hero of the young ticket buyers in "Five Easy Pieces." If you're a betting man on who is the Big Star of next year, this is your boy. Glenda Jackson: In a year notoriously short in standout feminine performances, this charmer smashed through in an extraordinary and unforgettable portrayal in one of the best pictures of the year, "Women in Robert Young: An all but re-tired veteran of both screen and tv fought back to take his tv series "Marcus Welby, M.D." to the top of the ratings time a(ler time the George Blanda of the acting world. Carrie Snodgress: Unusual young actress making an unusually Strong bid for Oscar recognition in "Diary of a Mad Housewife." A sure Oscar nom inee. David Frost: So what's he doing on this list? The smooth Britisher from the talk shows belongs to tv, but he deserves the kudo for being outstanding in his field and one of the most talked about personalities of the year. t- Peter Boyle: Otherwise known as "Joe," in a portrayaK.of great power in a little picture- BV CHARLES H.

GOREN Br TM CNuw Tribmt WEEKLY BRIDGE QUIZ Q. 1 Neither side -vulnerable, and as South you hold: JII43 0S: KQ7 The bidding has proceeded: West North East South 1 0 Dble. Pass What do you bid? Q. 2 As South, vulnerable, you hold: 4Q73 (7164 OAJ1073 A8 The bidding has proceeded: South West North East 10 Pass Pass 2 0 Pass 3 Pats What do you bid now? Q. Both vulnerable, and dealer you hold: AQ VAQMZ OAK 4 A85 What is your opening bid? Q.

4 You are South, East-West vulnerable, and you hold: 1073 OK43 KQ The bidding bat proceeded: North East South 1 10 What do you bid? fcL 29G0RfflaiflRnKE2 i i (CONTINUED THOU PAGE ONE) know it all. One day Charlie's going to kiek-tite-, out of them." Ostibow, 22, is driving the track. It's not much different from the earth moving tractor he used to maneuver on construction sites back is Owosso, except here be might hit a mine. "When I get, out I'm going to get married and raise lots of little kiddies," he says gently. The tracks reach their night defensive position a mile from the Alpha 4 perimeter and form a protective circle.

Their crews set up 81mm mortars, wise shields to protect the vehicles from rocket propelled grenades and place trip flares to warn of an enemy attack. They also blow foxholes with TNT "eas ier than digging." It is 20 minutes until the Christmas cease-fire and fire bases up and down the line un leash a final furious artillery barrage to let Charlie know he can't come across. Eight-inch shells scream over the heads of the APC crews as they heat up C-rations. "I'm glad there's a ceasefire," says Cox. "How can anyone sleep with all that racket." But he's not really glad.

None of Margo's" crew is happy about their instructions not to fire unless fired upon. "I can see the North Vietnamese telling their men they'll be court-martialed for shooting crows Andrzejewski. "Like Hell." "I'll tell you what the ceasefire means to guys like us," he said. "It means we sit here like dummies waiting to get hit while the gooks are moving around free as you please." Light is fading, 6 p.m., ceasefire! Two German shepherd dogs specially trained to sniff out mines snugglejip to their haiidlers under a small tent. Two radarmen loll in another tent watching the little green line that can pickup an enemy footstep 6,000 yards away when it works right.

"The officers never consult us about where to stop," one of them said. "This is a bad position. We're in a depression when we should be on a hilltop. Our radar is useless where it is." It's now so black vou can't see the guards in their machine gun turrets. Mosquitos whine.

A slap, a curse. Some light up and little red glow worms wink in the night as the sweet smell of marijuana cloys the air. Beer cans pop. Four hours into the cease-fire and all's quiet when a trip flare goes off. Silhouettes stare stupidly at the burning phosphorus, then hit the dirt.

Others jump in foxholes. This is serious. Wind can set off a trip flare but there's no wind tonight. It could have been a rabbit, but there aren't many animals left in the DMZ. It could be Charlie.

If it wasn't for the cease-fire machine guns would be spraying the perimeter with protective fire. "Shoot up a lume," Barks Drumgole, and the illumination flare arcs upwards. Another follows, then a third. But it's misty and visibility is still bad as the flares float down on their little parachutes. The men wait five, 10 minutes and everyone relaxes.

Midnight. Rat-tat-ta-ta-ta-tat. A machine gun opens up from Alpha 4. Green, red and white flares shoot skyward and artillery booms. "There goes the cease-fire," someone mutters as the ponchos spring to life.

The lieutenant runs to the command carrier to radio headquarters! and comes back smiling. "They're just celebrating. It's Christmas Day. Merry Christmas." Christmas morning and not worth, going back to sleep. Yawns cracking beard-stubbled young faces, the men pack up to go back to Alpha 4.

Maybe Santa isn't really dead and there's a package from home. Body (CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE) worked overtime looking for clues to her disappearance, but had been unsuccessful. A $1000 reward had been established by friends and relatives and was withdrawn only days ago, after further investigation failed to provide any additional information to her whereabouts, Petitions were also presented Dec. 8 to Judge Garner L. Moody of the 38th judicial cir cuit requesting that a grand jury be called to investigate the case.

According to Sheriff Barnes, the investigation will definitely be revived, but he admifteSTthat he had no suspects from Stone County at this time. The remains have been re turned to Harris Funeral Home at Ozark; Survivors include her React (CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE) try home, and read a lesson from St. Luke. Most of western Europe en- Joyed a white Christmas after substantial snowfalls. But there was a notable exception.

Much of usually snowy Norway, including the capital, Oslo, were without snow. Tass reported on Christmas services in the Soviet Union, saying calls for peace were made at all the 145 Lutheran churches in Estonia The agency also reported on the Christmas service at the Episcopal Dome Cathedral at Toompea, and the sermon deliv- ered by Archbishop Alfred Tooming: "We are in the festive spirit. We 'have peace, But peace is dreamed about in many places on the earth. It is our Christian duty to help people who are de fending their homes. In Moscow, Christmas Masses were conducted by Dean Stasis Mozheiko of the Roman Catholic Church of St.

Ludovic, Tass said. The Mass was attended by Moscow Catholics and members of foreign embassies. In New York City, the Salvation Army prepared Christmas dinners for 2,000 needy persons and sent checks to another 4,000 families to buy provisions for their own holiday dinners. In Los Angeles, the Salvation Army said it would feed 3,500 persons. And in Bend, Jerry Hastings, a 29-year-old furniture auctioneer wanted "to do something special this year." So he hired the hall of a Roman Catholic church in central Oregon's Deschutes County and distributed 250 dinner tickets each good for an entire family.

The welfare department sent written invitations to another 91 families. "Anyone who comes to the oor gets to eat," said Hastings, hose family helped cook the meals. Forty miles south of the U.S. -Mexican border town of San Ysidro, 72 teenagers from a half-dozen Oregon communities spent three days and the night before Christmas with children of the Door of Faith Orphanage between Tijuana and Ensenda, Mexcio. The Americans left tons of food, clothing and gifts with the 95 orphans and painted the main building before heading home in two buses and a trailer Christ mas day.

Bishop Earl Hunt, head of the Western North Carolina United Methodist Conference, visited Mecklenburg County Jail Christ mas Eve giving prisoners a prayer, handshakes and 200 bags of fruit, hard candy and homemade cookies prepared by local churchwomen. "These folks have troubles, and if the church has any meH, sage, it's for them," said the bishop who was greeted by women in one cellblock singing "Silent Night" around their handmade paper Christmas tree. In the Suffolk Mass. County Jail, Humberto S. Medeiros, archbishop of the Boston Roman Catholic archdiocese, said Mass Christmas Eve for 200 prisoners.

And 11 inmates of the Idaho penitentiary spent Christmas at home with their families. All eli gible for parole shortly, they were given 12-hour releases, and instructed to return to the pris By ELIZABETH L. POST i Copy wright 2970, Emily Post Institute, Inc.) Dear Mrs. Post: I married an older man with many friends his own age. Some of them I had known before and addressed them as Mr.

and Mrs. I was reintroduced to them by my new husbind on a first-name basis. Was I correct in calling these people by their first names or should I have waited until each person asked me to call them "John" and This has bothered me for some time, altho I realize it is a bit late to correct. Penny Dear Penny: You were perfectly correct. When you entertained his circle of friends by your marriage you are entitled to be treated as one of them in every way the years make no difference.

You surely would have seemed very stiff or self-conscious if you continued to Yule (CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE) robbery and was held under $25,000 bond. He did not enter a plea but was bound over for a later hearing. State police said additional charges are pending against Graham in Oakland County where he reportedly took at gunpoint the car he had driven into the ditch when the Glbouts came along. Mrs. Gibout, a nurse, said she felt no real regrets over the family decision to stop and aid the disabled motorist.

"You know how it is with Christmas Two hours into Christmas morning, mora than lao American soldiers, some still jungle combat fatigues, walked off a chartered jet from Vietnam at Chicago's O'Hare airport. "I sure didn't think that I'd be home for this Christmas," said Capt. John Wothe, of Milwaukee, one of the soldiers who will spend two weeks of holiday leave at home under a program initiated by the U.S. Command Saigon this year. However, Christmas was not a occasion for rejoicing everywhere.

Burglars in Wilmington. Ohio, made off with 800 pounds of wild game meat collected by area hunters for a charitable dinner Feb. 2. The meat, mostly moose, elk and deer collected on trips all over the nation, was valued by police at $2,000. in Detroit, 100 black Catholics including some clerics, marched into Blessed Sacrament Cathedral shortly before John Cardinal Dearden celebrated mid night Christmas eve mass.

They read a manifesto about "the failure of the Roman Catholic church to fulfill its responsi- bilities to the black commu- nity." Thieves threatened to sour Christmas for a Colombian couple in Austin, and a 9-year-old Toledo, Ohio, youth. But Austin Police Sgt. John Vasquez and local residents stepped in when Eduardo Con- suegra and his pregnant wife were robbed in a motel Wednesday night of $330 in cash and $800 in checks. The money was all they had except for $1 in change. Consuegra's father had sold his stocks in the Colombian airline for which he flies to pay his son's way to Austin where he is enrolled in the University of Texas.

Sgt. Vasquez collected enough money for a Christmas telephone call home; residents, reading of Consuegra's plight in the Austin American Thursday morning, contributed $730 in cash and a local car dealer told the couple they could use a car free while they looked for an apartment. Early Christmas morning, thieves stole all the toys from Basil Scott's car in Toledo, but his son Lorenzo had Christmas anyway because a sleepy toy store owner arose at 3 a.m. to help replace the toys. Jerome Kreinberg, owner of Fun City Store, contributed some of the toys.

Police, who had called Kreinberg after hearing the story on radio station WTTO, chipped in for others. Patrolman George Wagner, who helped in the toy hunt, said, "How do you explain to a 9-year-old boy no Santa Claus came last night?" For the 17th year in a row, Harvey Morgan, sheriff of Chester County, S.C., carried food, fruit and gifts to the homes of needy families on Christmas Eve. It began the night before Christmas Eve in a year Morgan was still a deputy. He went with other deputies to search a house for stolen goods and found a penniless mother and six hungry children. The next night the deputies came back with food and presents for the whole family.

This year, Morgan and his wife visited 25 families in a police cruiser loaded with gifts contributed by Chester residents. the right thing call his friends "Mr. and Mrs." until they happened to realize you were waiting for them to suggest the change. Dear Mrs. Post: I am planning to be married in 1971.

My problems are My parents are divorced and my father has since remarried. My mother and father are on good terms, as I also am with his second wife. I Would like to know the proper wording for the invitation as my father is absorbing most of the wedding expenses. Do I include both names or just my mother's with whom I have always lived? Where would my father and his wife sit in the church? Would my mother and father dance together at the start of the wedding reception? I would appreciate any help you can give ma. Fern Dear Fern: Since your parents are friendly and are sharing in giving the reception, both names should be on the invitation: Mrs.

(maiden-name or Mary) Smith and Mr. and Mrs. John Smith request the honor of your presence at the marriage of Joan Smith to etc Your mother should sit in the first pew, your father and his wife in the second. You and your groom should dance alone first. Then his father should cut in cn you and your groom should ask your mother to dance, Your father should dance with his wife, and later with your mother.

Don't be caught dead sitting on your teat belt. riot of Las Vegas, after 13 years of singing and swivel-hipping, still the best at doing it. Frank Langella: Young Broadway actor making big impact as the lover-heel in "Diary of a Mad Housewife" and send-, ing the ladies out of the theatre singing over his villainy. Not all sex he can act. Flip Wilson: The personality hit of the tv reviews and revues, proving that BiacK is also mn-! ny.

Ross Hunter: The producer who did everything "wrong." In a year of squeaking economy he spent $10,000,000 on "Airport." In a year of the smart guys on the prowl for "new facts," he put Dean Martin, Burt Lancaster and Helen Hayes in his cast. The critics panned the picture. at year's end, more people have paid their way in to see "Airport" than any other film, the take is somewhere up around $50,000,000, give a mil- lion here or there, and it is the box office hit of this and many seasons, the money "champ." And that's the name of jame. Nativity Scene Is His Method Of Saying Thanks OMAHA, Neb. (AP) Sts.

Peter and Paul Catholic church had a unique gift Friday from a parishioner who wanted to do something for those who had helped him. A 22-year-old member of the congregation, paralyzed from the neck down, spent several hundred hours making a nativity scene, said the Rev. Anthony Petrusic, pastor. "1 had never done anything for my church and my parish has done a lot for me," said Dennis Raster, paralyzed for five years since he broke his neck in a swimming pool diving accident. Kaster has just enough mobility in his hands In smooth away imperfections in prepared clay statue forms.

The statues are then "fired" in a hospital's ceramics kiln and made ready for painting. Kaster paints by holding a brush with his teeth. Guerrilla Bases Attacked by Jordan -AMMAN, Jordan (AP) The Jordan army overran Palestinian guerrilla bases in a hilly triangle 15 miles northwest of Amman, Friday and a government spokesman said two soldiers were killed and two were wounded. The attack climaxed a series of clashes in the area which overlooks the town of Salt 10 ftilesxfrom the cease-fire line with Israel. Q.

5 As South, vulnerable, you hold: Q7 CAQ4 OA5 3 10752 The bidding has proceeded: North East South West I Pass 2 NT Pass 3 Pass 7 What do you bid now? 1 Q. 6 East-West vulnerable, and as South you hold: 4.KQ94 OKQ103 The bidding has proceeded: South West North East 10 Pass Pass What do you bid now? Q. 7 Neither vulnerable, and as South you hold: Q.I6 OK97J 1043 The bidding has proceeded: West North East South 1 Dble. Pass 1 0 Pass 1 NT Pass What do you bid now? Q. Both vulnerable, and as South you hold: AKQ1062 VI 01U AJlX The bidding has proceeded: East South 3S What do you bid? Look for answer Monday) O.u fnm NAVOHU.

WIATM ttdVCJ AnmliUtS ffm Winpktto "The group pays him $15,000 a year. Students of the arts will find new up-to-date classrooms, labs and areas for graphics and de sign, paintiog, jirawing, sculp ture, ceramics and music studies. The Edward C. and Ann Roberts Science and Arts Build ing, as it is to be called, will make possible a professional- style 600-seat auditorium with large proscenium stage facil ities. There will be a scene shop theatre costume store room, two dressing rooms and a green room for actors adjacent to the stage.

The thespians will use the theatre area for 30 weeks of the year. In addition, the building may be used as a community arts center. The foundation was established as a charitable, educational and cultural foundation by Roberts. One of its main purposes was to find a permanent home for the theatre group, with whom the two had sentimental attachments. It was there that 51 year old Roberts, a met Ann a widow.

Six months later, they were married and the two played -tgtjiex in many of the theatre group's offerings. Roberts, an alumnus of Yale University, had been a member of the glee club and enjoyed playing the cello'and oboe. At 75, Ann Roberts, a vivacious, petite woman known to her friends as still plays in the shows and is about to undertake her 27th role. She has been on their board of directors for 26 years. She likes to play roles made famous by the late Josephine Hull "Harvey," "Arsenic and Old Lace," etc.

whose style she can emulate. Movie and television star Peter Falk was a member of the theatre group, she says. The late Ed Begley acted with them. Though the ground-breaking has barely begun, Mrs. Roberts has enthusiastically purchased for the theatre two paintings by John Wolp that she saw on exhibit at the Whale Gallery in Nantucket, where she has a small Cape Cod summer home.

One painting is particularly appropriate, showing a barefoot young man in opera clothes sitting at a candelabra-lit long dinner table set in a lush green garden. Dispensing the foundation's funds for one or another charities takes a great deal of her time. She is childless and is particularly happy that the foundation can do something for young people that furthers their educa tion in the arts and the theatre in particular. Beihl (CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE) their appearance before the parody of justice at burgos. "Our second objective was to attract the attention of the whole world to the existence of our people and our unshakable will to fight for our integral liberation: national independence, reunification of the south and north parts of the former autonomous Basque Republic, and installation of a modern, democratic, autonomous and socialist Basque state.

"We consider," the statement added "that these two objectives have been attained, at least for the moment." The communique confirmed it was the ETA which "executed" Manzanas, and warned that there may be other victims like him. "If only one of our brothers falls, our retaliatory action will be automatic and will strike directly the person or persons belonging to the Spanish-imperialist apparatus occupying the south zone of the former Basque Autonomous Republic." The military trial and Beihl's kidnaping set off reaction arpund the world. Governments sent Gen. Francisco Franco pleas for humanity. Demonstrators massed in streets and smashed windows in Spain.

Franco himself spoke to a mas sive counter-demonstration in Madrid. One newsmen succeeded in seeing Beihl during his captivity. That was Thursday night af ter a long trip blindfolded, by car and on foot. He said Beihl, partaking of Christmas delicacies with his masked guards, broke down and cried several timet when expressing hope of again seeing his family. The guards too appeared to be touched by emotion, he HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Richard Benjamin returns to the big screen for the starring role in "The Marriage of a Young Stockbroker" at 20th Century- Fox.

through the display window of the Soviet national tourist office in Paris. The Jewish Defense Committee later issued communique claiming responsibility and saying it would continue its action campaign. Iem of much needed arts and science space for students, but the Masquers will have a home and they will be able to draw on juvenile talent for plays. The drama department students and the theatre group will cooperate, ahdscholarships will be awarded to drama students to study at the theatre's work shop." In addition, young people can aid in decorating scenery and learn first-hand technical aspects of theatre production. The thespians have chosen a "top-notch managing she points out, the well-known actor, ing, marching and chanting demonstration was kept well away from the embassy.

In New York. Hadassah, the women's Zionist organization, issued a statement Friday urging the Soviet high court to reverse the conviction "and let these people go." "In the name of justice and human decency, we appeal to the Soviet Union: do not add to the list of martyrs by yet another cynical miscarriage of justice," the group said. On Thursday, Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld, president of the American Jewish Congress, called on President Nixon, Pope Paul and the World Council of Churched to intercede with the Kremlin in the case. "The real crime of these brave Jews is that they want to lead a Jewish life in the Jewish state," Lelyveld said.

Other Jewish groups issued similar statements. Several hundred youngsters also demonstrated outside the Soviet mission Thursday, chan ting "Am Yisroel Chai" thei people of Israel live. Three Jewish students in Marseille, France, began a hunger strike and some 200 demonstrators gathered in Stockholm to protest The Jewish Youth Organizations of Scandinavia, meeting in Copenhagen, sent resolutions to the Soviet embassies in Denmark, Norway and Sweden condemning "all attempts to discriminate and criminalize Jews who want to leave the Soviet union and emigrate to Israel." The World Jewish Congress released in London a statement calling the death sentences "incredibly harsh and repugnant." A spokesman said an international Jewish delegation has been meeting with Vatican officials in Rome, urging Pope Paul VI to intervene. In Vienna, the League of Jew-ishvPcrsecutees Under the Nazi Regime sent a telegram to Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin saying: "The inhumane sentences are in no proportion whatsoever to the so-called guilt of the defendants." It called on the Soviet Union as a member of the United Nation to "respect the convention on human rights which contains freedom of emigration." Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, general secretary of the World Council of Churches, issued'1 a statement urging amnesty or pardon for prisoners everywhere held for offenses of a "political nature." "Today, I think especially of the Jews condemned in Leningrad, the Basques In Spain and the blacks on Bobbins Island in South Africa," Blake said.

"It is of the essence of true humanity for the strong to show mercy. A paving stone was thrown ger both against the trial and Moscow's refusal to allow Russian Jews to emigrale to Israel. In Tel Aviv, several, thousand school children chanted "let my people go" and demonstrated outside the Finnish embassy. The Finns have maintained Soviet interests since the 1967 rup ture of diplomatic relations. In Eilat on the Gulf of Aqaba, the municipality cabled an appeal to Los Angeles Mayor Sam Yorty to rally support for the condemned men.

Los Angeles is the sister city of Eilat. Haifa high school pupils messaged President Nixon, urging him to approach the Russians. Rakah, the pro-Moscow Com-munist party, sent a note to Soviet President Nikolai Podgorny condemning what it called the Israeli "anti-Soviet propaganda campaign." It also appealed for a modification of the death sentences. In an address to parliament Prime Minister Golda Mcir a native of Russia, said the struggle of Russian Jewry was not against the government, but was rather a national awakening for the right to join their own people" in Israel. The defendants' only.

crime, she said, was that "they dared approach the Soviet authorities to let them go to Israel." "Woe to this big power that it has to use such means as the Leningrad trial," she added. "The Jewish people still remember the days of the (Spanish) inquisition, but we have proved the inquisitioners are no longer, while the Jewish people are still alive." Demonstrations against the Leningrad trial continued abroad. In London, several hundred British Jews demonstrated outside the Soviet embassy. The demonstration was order ly. A three-man delegation en tered the Soviet embassy to de liver a formal protest and a demand that both the death sentences and the prison terms be quashed.

A British Communist party statement said: "Many friends of the Soviet Union will be gravely concerned at the death sentences Imposed by the Soviet court in Leningrad on two of those accused of hijacking and hope that the higher authorities will commute these death sen tences without delay." In Washington, some 200 dem onstrators chanting "Let My People Go" and "Stop the Kang aroo Court Now" burned a hand-painted Soviet flag about two blocks from the Russian Embassy. An 11-man delegation asking to discuss "our great concern and agony" over the hijack trial was turned away at the embassy and a small group stood across the' street The flag-burn Snow, Showers husband, Larry; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Hor-ton, 946 West Poplar; a brother, Robert Gene, 946 West Poplar; and maternal grandparents, Mr.

and Mrs. Earl Swearingin, Fa-yetteville, Tenn, Mrs. Blades was a member of the Bible Baptist Church of Republic, and a 19C7 graduate of Nixa High School. It will snow Saturday over the north central portion of the Atlantic Seaboard and In northern North Dakota and Minnesota. Showers are predicted for the northern Plains and the northern Bock; Mountain states.

It will be cold in the northern Plains and in the East and warm In the south central portion of the nation. and all you feel that you have to help our fellow man." i.

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 300+ newspapers from the 1700's - 2000's
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra® Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Springfield News-Leader
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

About The Springfield News-Leader Archive

Pages Available:
1,309,561
Years Available:
1883-2024