The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 18, 1938 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, February 18, 1938
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Page 3
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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1938 Roosevelt's Successor? McNuii's Booms mamjer Is tills Uie ninn whp will follow JlooseveU? He Is Paul varies McfliiU, u. S, High Commissioner to (he Philippines. Pictured here behind Hie President, McNnli hopes to stay right In that position and tnil Mr. liooscvelt into the While House. BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS llY NBA Service TMDIANAI'OLia. !••(•}>. buildup of paul V. McNiitl lor tin- 1940 nemocralie lyx-Mdential noun JHUioii nlrendy is iiadtrwa/, :ii><i i' hlg push comes from i Hu-vear-okl Eriink McH ill Indiana's new Beinosmlic rational commit toe ninn. McHale—political adviser, faiher and trouble slionler tor the former Indiana governor ,sii> i , 1027—has (lie job of kee^iu.r M I Null alive politteilly wtillf lie still | Is « I"'Oiled hi'' (ill hi till.' Pai'lliC as liigh commissioner of tlic Philippine Islands. •Jo net this jnli done, Mellalo employs much the same methods as those Jiunes A. Parley used in pushing Franklin n. Roosevelt nloii ; > the trail ivliich eventually j led to Hie Dtniocrniic presidential. nomination in in:i2. Fnetut.s call Meffalc "McNnU's Jim Farley," and lie even look. 1 ; n foil like Ihe postmaster general. Farley, incidentally, niay have a lot to do with whether McNutt gets or misses the 1940 nomination. Since the 193i! Democratic national convention the two have been feuding. And there is always the possibility that Farley may l>e out after the nomination himself. Seeks Spotlight In an attempt to combat the jlangcr of McNutl's sinking into Apolitical obscurity because of his absence from the United states, \McHaIe brings his candidate back to Indiana Feb. 10 for (lie state Democratic Editorial Association's banquet. 'nil's is to be followed, by a big reception in Washington Feb. 23. Senator and Mrs. Sherman Minion are sending 3000 engraved invitations for this little affair, and Indiana observers say the attendance will hit around '1500 or 5000. 'Hie party will set some sort of a record in the nalionnl capita). Attendance at- White House receptions usually runs only about 2000. The ostensible reason for McNutt's return to the United States ! Is to bring President Roosavc.lt a report on far eastern conditions, but McHale hopes to make plenty of political capital of it. Woii.'d Take Cabinet Post Afi/M- McMi'tfs bow iu Washington, his friends would like to obtain K c."i)inet nost. for him or. failing In that, get him elected president _.')f the l/niversity of Indiana. B Financing the McNutt-for-Presi- ! dent campaign is a 2 per cent .;l«b made up of Indiana officials who voluntarily contribute 2 per cent of their salaries. Launched by Mc- Nntt when he was governor (193236). this organization is believed to raise more than SIOO.MO annually and it may be financing the Washington reception. McNutt and McHale first as political foes, was a campaign opponent of McNutt in a fight, for Indiana American Legion commander. McNult won. Tile following years they joined = Weekly Suiidny Sctmol f.ossonr PAGB THREE Choosing (\)-Workors forces. MeHale bCKiuie .slate commander and McKutt national commander. McHnlc managed MeNuU's successful campaign for |>ovcri)or in 1!!32. McHale (hen opened a la\v office in Indianapolis and was placed in charge of the administration's legislative program. In Iliat capacity he drew both praise and blame. He was responsible for the passage of taxing and banking laws which other states have copied. He also obtained centralization ot state government under the,governor. Tills action alienated many old- line Demociiit.s. McHale also was credited with being the author of Indiana's centralized control system of alcoholic beverage sales. Opponents for his liquor program, with its monopolistic beer porls-of-entry feature, charged it was ;ised "as a particularly vicious form of politic-al patronage." When he was elected to succeed Thomas Taggart on the national imhteo. McHale made only this ftatement: •[ want to aid Paul V. McNutt to reniire Hie 1940 presidential nomination." fact of persons receiving onlv ? r \ cents per month, but pointed out that the petition, a.s well as numerous press reports concerning the petition, had failed to mention that these families are also receiving various commodities such as potatoes, rice and lard. i'iie ofllce said investigation of the 21 names on the petition disclosed that three of them are on WPA rolls, receiving $32 p cr month, and a fourth is drawing $25 per month from a son in a CCC camp, thus eliminating lliese four from relief assistance. Certain facts coming to the attention of the local relief office, an Investigator said yesterday, since the arrival of the petition have brought about the belief by the local office that the petition may have had Its beginning with a merchant who was dissatisfied with the small orders placed with him by Die relief ofllce. HV WM. K. CII.KOY. I). 1). KJIIor of Ailvuinc If one wished to mark Hie difference between lh« great ami true Teacher utul (lie demagogues who. 111 vnijons ages, have professed lo have piinncens tor the Ills of liunmnlty, he could not Ihid It, mom emplmslzed thnn In the opening words of our lesson: "Jems with His disciples withdrew lo the -sea." It Is Ihe mark of Ihe demu- tjoane that he always wiinl.s lo be with the crowd, or wunts to have the crowd with him; but Jfsns wus contlntinlly withdraw- ' ing from the multitude. ! Was It Ihul He hud no int's- .sfige for the commoii people, nnd did not wish to give the Gospel to the multitude? Not ut nil. On the contrary, the common people heard Him gladly, and we .see Jesus constantly In places where people were congi-egming In llielr dally life, and In the synagogues mul the temple, where lliey con- Ki'egnicd for worship. But almost InvaiiiiWy, where tlie multitude Mirroitnded Him, hearing of Ills fame, the emphasis wns always u|x>ii the llilugs Hint Me ia<J to express. The people were rot and decay., John E. Kelley, of Memphis, niid W. -I,, n-nzoc, of St. Louis, will be in charge of the oirnlr In which local paint dealers lire cooperating. diRi'r for more physical hr-nPlH, but they Old not |H'rcolvi> thi' niH-d of Ills jtplrltuui li'iirhliiK, "\v seek Me." He said on ono omislon, "nin Uecnusi' ye see Hie miracle iK'ouiM- jv did eal of the mid «•<>]•« lilli'd." but '{'litioti Sent Mrs. 'Roosevelt Had 21 Signers CARUTnEREVILLE, Mo.. Feb. 18 -. ^ l^titlon recently sent to Mrs - 'saner Roosevelt, purported lo have two hundred signers, from among unemployed families in tin; T'coter community, south of liere. n'as found yesterday to have actually only 21 signers, when il was returned to this county from WPA headquarters, lo which Mrs. Roosevelt litid sent it. The petition, which set out that members on relief from the Cooler immunity were, only receiving 25 To Give Dinner Tonight For Painters, Builders Painters, contractors, architects real estate dealers and paint dealers of Blytheville have been Invited to a dinner at tt)e Hole Noble tonight when they will be guests of the National Lead company. Following- the dinner, which is to begin at 6:30 o'clock, a talking motion piclure "The War Is On" will be shown and a demonstration of exterior nnd Interior paints will be given. The picture will show the fight being waged ngnhist' rust. Who slunil out most prominently am ivtor mul Ihe two Ill-others, .liunes nnd .lolin. We do not know so miit'li ulioul Andrew, yet It mis Andrew who Imiunlil his brollii-r, I'l'IlT. Ill Jl'SllS. Tin' niiluri' of Ills vi'liillonshlp lo Ills disciples mul lo the KhiK doni ut llenven Hull He had come to claim l.s finphiisl/.cil in >\ puss- uuf In our lesson that mluht grille Moiucwlml hiirshly niiun our inud- If we illil not rend It. i-orii- I Pi-opcrly mul UncHv.' Us inilh | Wli'.'ii Jesus was liihl '111111 His untl I Hicllier and Ills Uvtlm-n wen 1 I'urkm in (i o thj-oiii'li' Wll ' l!lu| fur Him imlsldc. we lire mnkluit conliids with | Ull(l llu " ll1 ' *'M. "Who Is my iiiiiu; nour ut llinu in I '""'''' : ' ""'I i'i.v IJii'llnvn?" nnil, lives llio tnii' leiu-liliii! | '""'''"i; round im il»' i-iiinpiiny, Clod's love mid ilyhl- "'' mldi'd. "llelml:| my mutlii'r nnd my bi-t'llii-i'ii. for wliosocvci- shall . in; «'" H»' will (if Clod. Ihe .sumo l.s my clUMKiug I),,. 12 u.j, 0 U ,',, R> ,„ | A , | IJi-iilhi-r and slsln- mul mollu'i-." Ills ixirtk-iiliir disciples, Hie Imur , WHS Jesus mlnlmlKlnii th •li'Mis ivall/ed llml ... „ llueuri's were not upon crowds mul nmliitiicli'.s. bm were i>xpri'\si'il In clusc I'Diitiicl with Individuals anil I wllh small i'1-oiips. Ho n-liivd uuo !: " ll! nnli'l pliii-i-.s ivllli His (llsdplct,- llml i' 1 '' 11 Hi' miviit U'ucii iiiem uml inline with Itii'in. Hi- 'nit out I lie uposlli' •Id dih..|- llu> vlllat;,. pi'opli-. brl Ihi'ir dally conci-inin^ Anlo Pull* Mule. Out of Muil NAI'A, Cnl. till')— When n mule belonging to Hurry Ijiiloly fell oil bridge and Innded In south llrat. the old routine of lo extricate H, a mule pulling an auto out of the mire was reversed. The mule was unable to get Its hind feet out of the mud, and is cnr wns summoned i'i- we hiive Ihe story of ' clrcli- whom we call "thi' Apusllt's." We m-i-;i not il«-i'll upon the men whom Ji' M | S ,.|| OS ,,, 'j.),,,!,. |, umi . s nnd i-huiiuU'is nre wi'll known, :.o f nr as II,,' Scrlptm-cs li-ll us imy- llilni? In di'lull roiici'i-ntni; llirm. Ahum most or them we huve nn csii'iivive kiiowlcdBc; Ihf uiics lira FOR Services Held For Miss Montgomery; Rey 11 o i r Funeral Plans Incomplete c«r In whid, Mis Rcynoi, wen- family Injure:], Is t hf given a lieurlnsj on charts ot reckless dilvlu.; In connection with Hie accident, lie was pluecil In the ~"""" .lull ut Osceola. Stevens was slightly Injured in Ihe crush. Cobb Punernl Home of nlythc- vllle brought Miss Montgciiiory'.s hoily from Memphis un:l was in charge of funeral arrangements at Kejiiiett. 'j'lic young ivomaii Is survived by her parents, the Rev. nnd Mrs. II. D. Montgomery of oliulden, Mo., nnd several brothers who nls» live In Missouri. At the lime of her death she was employed us n Waitress at a beer garden operntiul by cimrles Corey. till!- I inly iind bounty uml responslUII- | llv (if Ininlly i-cliitfonsliijisV Nol ut! "11. On Ihe conlrury. lie wu.s iin- phiiM/lnit Iho reality nnd dcpih tl I hi: kimil of lovi' bi.'twi'cn HIOBC who huve truly ncri'iiletl the roii- .'cluiisiii'ss of Cud's fiillieiliooi), mul mi' llvlnii In Iliii coimmmldii i'f love mid Bruce: If we doubled lids, we should ,-ecnll the fuel 1 Him ihe mother of Jesus followed Him to the cross, and .stood by, .slim-liiK Ills A-iin'erlnii; nnd in Uic time or Ills li-.sl iigony Jesus com- inlltcd Hie cure of His mother W the dlsdule whom He loved. IT COSTS LESS- To tot us KEEP yo,, v ''car in shape than il does lo repair it after it tins broken down. In- t'lvasG Urn value of your CHI- mid MOT US KBKP IT IN A-l CONDITION!. COMPLETELY New and Modern Auto Repair Shop We Cjjin Meet Your Every Automobile Need All Work Guaranteed LEE MOTOR SALES, Inc. Oldsmolillc & (J.M.C. Triioks & Trailers Suits and Hcrvii'c :!07 13. Main St. Phone 32'J Final rites were held this afternoon atKennett, Mo., for Miss Opal Montgomery, 20-year-old Blythe- vllle waitress wbo ivas one of two victims of a highway accident near Frenchman's Bayou Tuesday ni-jht. The body was returned here from Memphis late yesterday and taken to Kennett today for burial. Services were conducted tit the Pcmla- eostal church there at two o'clock. The body of one of Miss Montgomery's companions in the wreck. Fred Reynoir. 19. high line construction worker, remained in Memphis today awaiting the arrival i . By Eli/abcth Blythe, r> O there of relatives from Fort Worth, 1 Ed B. Cook. Atty. for IMlf. Te - x - i E. E. Alexander, Atty for Def Kiln-old Stevens, 23. driver of Die•,.(Seal) • . 28-4-ll-lS VVAKNINC; ounicit IN THE CHANCERY OOU R'l CHICKASAWUA 1) I S T R i C '!', MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS. Mrs. Eainle High! Platnllir, vs. No. CCOB Adam Illuli, Defendant. The defendant Adam High Is warned to appear within thirty days In the court named in the caption hereof and answer the I complaint or the plalntill, Mvs.i Eamie High. „Dated tins 24 dny of January,! 1038. II. M. CHAIO. Clerk If This Ad Will Bring You In Our Service Will Bring You Back A MOST COURTEOUS, EFFICIENT BARBER SERVICE Broadway Barber Shop L. M. Graves, Pni|>.—Ncxl Nmir to rjirmors Bank—EDWIN JONES, Mgr. I'KRSONNKL: LOYAL CKKEN SAM RHODES KRWIN WH1TWORTH — EDWIN JONES TWO KXI'EKT SHOE SHINKHS —A»E AND ItOH MAKE TIIE miOAWVAY, YOUR HAKHER SHOP cents pcr person pej' month, gained fn 1Q2G McHale manager for an nation-wiac notoriety in metro(X5lir tan and rural newspapers, and drew •.in acknowledgment from Mrs. Yesterday, a member of the local :oimlv relief office admitted the I 1USI SPKIKKU UIILt OK SOME MM*-SO CLUN TO KINDLE! :i Add Coal..A HOT FIRE in a l|FFY! QUICKLY THE CHARC01L CLEAN •CONVENIENT--- LAWRENCE TIBBETT ANDRE KOSTEUNETZ PAUL WHITEMAN DEEMS TAYLOR PAUL DOUGLAS lliete.% Red Seal*Royal Oak Wrigley The smirt. modern way (o kindle n fire—t/.SE Oak tlnnlicnfifl Charcoal. Rani.sh Ihe (rouble- s^mchunl for kinJline wood, danger of bruised finccrs nnd 5plin!cr.s. JUST crumple some piper in prnlc, sprinMc adnuhlchnTidrul oTCh.ircojl from the handy j>npcr hie. WINITK, II Hums quickly nilh stcadj', inlcnsc Ticat. Add Fuel. Charcoal will not smolhr r. Oak HarrftraatJ Charcoal i.s clean, FIREPLACES - FURNACES - STOVES OTHER USES: HEAT or HOT WATER BOILING or IRONING CAMPING PICNICS CANNING PRESERVING FEEDING HOGS SOLD AT YOUR NEAREST STORE 'IK Hi/lit H)W)IWKU«I«CO<1 10. HtVUtlS. TT.V.V. fRtC lirtt.irMC. md MORE PLEASURE in Chesterfields milder letter taste . . . and when you land on Chesterfields you find the three points of smoking pleasure ... all you look for in a cigarette MILDNESS that's refreshing TASTE that smokers like AROMA that makes you down' right hungry for a smoke. c 19)1, '•'

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