The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 25, 1944 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, April 25, 1944
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Page 6
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SIX'? (ARK.) COURIER NEWS TUESDAY. APR11, .20, J9<H yements To Buildings Are Made Here With (he coining of Spring, severs! of Bly.tlieville's residences and business establishments have' undergone Improvements-and repafrs. The J. H. Seeinan home at 212 .North:.Eighth street; lias been ie- deijorated both on the interior and exterior. /Two -large 'windows' on cadi side of Hie door have been added. Other .improvemtiHs Include lite painting of the stucco exterior nnd repalr.jOf the: front porch. . The .interior of (lie attractive Spanish type bungalow.' was repainted .ihroiighout and hardwood iloors rcfinlshed. ration of the I. R. Johnson clinic, 510 West Main. The brick building was' repainted while on the outside) nnd the interior walls were finished In a iialo liutf shade; ; Improvements to (lie Presbyterian nianse, 395 North Filth street, in dude redecorntlou of the Inlerloi and rellnlEhlng of hardwood floors In Ihe living and dining rooms. In the kitchen, linoleum has been laid, and storage cabinets bulll In. A new automatic hoi water heater Is being Installed in the seven-room fiamc house. Defendant Twice Listed .The name ot Hurt on Calhey was Inadvertently published twice I" Municipal Court news in connection with a fine assessed for disturbing Hie peace. He was Involved In an Incident .April 11, he told the Courier News todny, but since thai Completed recently .was rcdeco- tliuc hns not been In court. Heath & MiUigan ( HE MILT ONE SOYA PROTEIN PASTE PAINT Check These 'Amazing Features • No of tet odor — even in ifamp rooms. • Usually covers in one coat — no spots — no brush mark}. • Mixes quickly — ready to brush in o ftw minutes. • Goes on like "Goose Grease" — won't tire your arms. • Dries to touch in 30 minute's -i- try if • Won't rub off — today, tomorrow, or a yeor from now. • Cieons quickly and easily. • Goes on hew or old plaster without siiing or priming. E. C. ROBINSON LUMBER GO. • • / . ; Friendly Building Service 1 GAL. OF PASTE MAKES 1vt GAL PANT Official Lauds Housing Record Private Industry Makes Contribution To War Program WASHINGTON, April 24. — III sharp contrast • to World War I. when a» private construction of homes' was .slopped, private Industry has made an outstanding con- tribuiioii lo the ivnr program by building hundreds of thousands of homes (o meet the needs of essential war workers, Baric S. Draper, deputy commissioner of ihe Federal Housing Administration, points out. Private industry, with ihe assistance of KIIA Insurance, has constructed .more than, 580,000 war houses, Including homes built mi- fore Pear! YOUR HOME OF TOMORROW Colonial construction Is currently being ft Insure Roof Drainage "No IressjXissIng" signs won't stop the birds now migrating from Die south from building their nests In Butters and downspouts. But pan, and thin paint poured into It while the pipe Is slowly turned. While up fixing the gutters, take ».„ hick tl " l, P nvv architects Henry Otis nanced. This contribution of°prl- Chapman and Randolph Evans. ' rale capital lo war housing would Price, appearance, and roomi- not have been made without the '>«ss will appeal to those with llro- of '< e(i means hut unlimited taste. | The compact living room with its wide hcarlheci fireplace lends il- self to traditional furnishings anil (iecoratjon. Tlie two spacious bedrooms with convenient bath have ample closet space..A third bedroom can be provided on the second floor lo permit the house to grow with the family. , ,..j. .„ encouragement and .stimulation the PHA,".Mi'. Draper said. "FHA's role tn keeping the prl- ( vale building. Industry In operation during the war, period is comparable to its critinlly bnsie role in stlimilat- in grcvlvnl of residential construction from the ncute depression in the early 30s. A tolnl of 1,240,120 small home mortgages amounting to $5,500,000.000 has been Insured by Die FUA since its mortgage insurance system became effective in 1035." Menmijjlle ..lahii B. Blandford Jr., National Housing Agency administrator, urged the private build- Ing Industry to concentrate all Its energies and talents In the postwar period on development of a muss housing market in America in order to vouch n much higher production rate than was ever achieved. In the past. The building Industry, Mr. Blandford .said, Is on the threshold of n huge potential war market, composed of millions of families who will want good housing after the war ,who do not have It now and will lie 'able to pay an eco- who nomic price for duced product. Mr. Ulamlford added that an efficiently pro- the primary responsibility for peace- The kitchen has work areas nr- ranKcd in a convenient slcpsnviiif; plan. The dininc alcove, instead of a dining room, is m trend with post-\yiir style. Judicious use of glass marks (his house. Note the lar^e windows and how they arc spaced to provide adequate light and ventilation, yet leave plenty of unbroken wall area. The large picture window in the alcove gives new charm lo dining. In the basement, four Insnlux glass block panels set into Ihe foundation above grade flood the basement with li|»ht for easy vision. . Color will be used more 'freely in interiors and exteriors of postwar homes. And this house is no exception. Picture it painted while with light jjrcon- shutters and a bright green asphalt roof lo match —a root not only colorful but low in first cost, long in life,'and fire- resistant. Is it any wonder that this gay house of traditional"charm with its. bright colors, low spreading roof lino, broad porch, and picket fence is the type of home which will be built in profusion after the seek," he said, a five lo seven billion dollar a year postwar industry. We must seek a sustained production rate of 1,500,000 new houses a year, not 400,000 or 500,000. In tills way we can progress toward a goal of good housing for all Americans." Dell News Mi: and Mrs, S. C. Trammell have received news ot the marriage of their sou, Scrgt, Clarence Trnm- mell, to Miss Nell Grove of Sidney. Australia. The nmrrlnge was solemnized at Sidney on April 10. Sergeant Trammell, who entered the Army Air Forces In January, 1942, has been stationed in New „ ._. r Guinea for the past two/years. A tiniR housing rests with the com- fjiaduate of Dell high school, he imimtips In M-hicli .(he housing will was engaged in farming with' Ills' be huill, with local citizens;- locnl I rather prior to entering the armed la.cnjjtadnslry. "wi'"must, forces..,; - ' Home Loons 20 Billions Since 1939 CHICAGO. (UP)—More home mortgages have been made in ihe last five years than were outstanding in 1Q30, mid it is obvious thnt the FUA helped start the expansion In liomc-owncr credit, trie United States Savings and Loan League said. "New loans made by all lenders in the institutional and individual iicicl, for Ihe 1939-1943 period were S20.074,000.000. and of Jan. 1, 1930, the outstanding home mortgage tebt Is estimated to have been $17,721.000.000," they said. "The largest single thc dominant factor have been accompanied by feverish new highs in the prosperity of the nation, and a concoinilanl expansion in home mortgage lending," they. said. Benefit Song Recital To Be Given At Stee/e STEELR, Mo., Aplil 25.— Ml'S. O. T. Coll will present her voice pupils in a benefit sons recital MOJI- ituy night. 8 o'clock, with the. proceeds ot Ihe silver offering to be used to start choir roue .fund . for the Sleele Methodist. Church. Tlie recital will te given in the main auditorium of that church. Mrs. Coil hns been teaching voice at Steclc ;or tne past year and previously was active in music circles of St. Louis, where she was year's vol- contralto soloist at Kingshighwny ' owners can be constantly on the . . - ....„„, Tf ..„„ . „. - a,ers to see that they make their *•«>» *™ f £ ( ™ 0 »™*<» ucsls etahore. . | cvcr Ex|)erL , Sfly u sMom (0 Nests, leaves, and straw, as well pn i c j, , m olci ,. oof Generally it is as oilier debris, If allowed to stay morc economical to re-cover It with in gutters not only invite rust, but ft ncw> durable fire-resistant roof- alsu cause water to tack up under j,, c material such as asphalt shin- Ihe roof deck, cracking plaster nnd r gj es damaging wall paper. Gutters should be kept clean. They should have sufficient slope (o permit speedy drainage and the ends should lie lapped in the di- rectlon of the flow. Bust spots should lie brushed clean and covered with . a water-resistant paint. To paint the inside of a downspout, It should be stood on end in a Ii*fltl uonntr want U jus Kuril 10 nnj nor* Wn Hund» SELL U8 TUB FURNITCR* I'OU AltF. NOT USINU lor oubt Also liberal trade-in »U»w»ao» for old furulture*«n new, AJfin flurely Porn. Co. >ni r_ Main Phoa* MM PAINT UP-FIX UP! YOU CAN'T REBUILD There is no excuse for dull, drab rooms when, in a few hours, they can look as fresh as they used to. Our experienced painters and paperhangers can freshen up your whole house in a minimum of time. Call Phone 2272 for estimates. SPECIALS FOR -SPRING PAINTING 100% Pure Outside White . . 3.40 gal. Porch, Floor Enamel, all col. 3.50 gal. Semi Gloss Enamel, all col. 3.50 gal. Famous White Enamels Vitro-lite Super White Gloss 7.50 gal. ; O'Brien's Non-yellowing White Enamel .,...,. 5.25 gal. True-White Su. White Gloss 5.25 gal. J Satin Finish White Enamel . 4.70 gal. Other White Enamels ... 2.50 gal. up We Hove Complete Stocks of M I R R 0 R S The Biggest and Best Selection of WALLPAPER In Blythevitle! All Cofors and Patterns .Soft patterns in pleas- in.u; colors li pep up dreary bedrooms. All w.'i.shublc pnpors. Per Single Roll & up. HARD-TO.GET ITEMS Canvas - Tacks - Lining Paper - Paste - Dextrine - Aluminum Paint - Pure Linseed Oil. ARKANSAS PAINT, GLASS & .nxuvniN O.T1Q WALLPAPER CO. Bfyf/ievi/fc's Only Fxdusivo Point & Wallpaper Store -_..„,. . Phone 2272 STORE CLOSED WEDNESDAY AFTERNOONS STARTING MAY 3rd 100 R. Main time was in 1941, when $-1,311,000,- ' Presbyterian Church. At.the pies- .000-was. advanced on home mort-' enf.time she Is'organist and choir "gage security, anu in that year, a '< director at Methodist" Church'"in pcr v cent of it was made with FHA I Stcele, where Mr. Coil Is super- inteii' • • Insurance. ndent of schools. "Looking at the total home mort- }.==%• •-..- — gage lending volume as it developed [P oli Kh to disillusion-me." Jn the recovery yenrs, we sec that fl Link grinned at his own de- all of the home borrowing in 1935, jtription of his past. He liked it. 9t Pay* BEST Figure it out yourself. Whether you us* the BEST grade Old American Roofing or •n ordinary grade, it takes the same amount of time, labor and materials. The BEST roof may last twice as long as the other •-.;, one, coating much leas in the long run. • •%• Come In and let UB show you our stock . N v *- of roofing and supplies. We take pride In •<••-. giving every customer full value for every roofing dollar. Delta Lumber Co BIylheville's Only Home Owned Lumber Yard 204 N. Second I'hone 497 , the year that the insured mortgage phase of the PHA program got under way, amounted to S 1,428,000,000 exclusive of HOLC refinancing." they snlrt. "The European war. with its step- plns-up of business activity ami the five years during which it lias been WAR INDUSTRIES > NEED RAGS ^> ! got on with a pipeline con- ruction crew, as laborer, but ey soon fired him unceremoni- isly for prankstering on the job. ith the money Iie'd saved, and oceeds from the sale of a sow id pigs, he went lo a business 'liege in Chillicolhe, Mo. He alkcd into the business college lending lo take a banking course id become a hanker. Wailing lo 'gister, he sat beside a boy who as enrolling for the telegraphy iiirse, and learned telegraphers adc $140 a month. Beginning anUers made 560. Link clanged Americans." Housewives should search their closets, allies and bascmcnls for old clothes, and rags. Rags lo!?ay arn badly needed by w.ir industries—as badly needed as waste fats, papers, tins cans, rubber, and metals. Rags arc used to wipe Runs aboard ship nnd Ihe machines of industry. Rags arc needed to make blueprint paper, nnd cellulose for gun powder. Rags are sinews of war like tanks and Runs. , Housewives who send in a few rags alonK with papers lo salvage centers should feel they arc doing .their bil lo help assure early victory. WE CAN FILL YOUR ORDER . FOR PLUMBING SUPPLIES PRICES ARE RIGHT PETE IS THE 'LUNBEI 'HE race horse Jones, the fleabag, had really given him a >rmancnt lesson in how good it to enjoy hope. It seemed to Link al he had enjoyed everything ore than some other people after a I. He had enjoyed the /arm, which ade an overgrown ox of a boy it of him. Al IB, passing lor 13, Ill's Air Corps career had been tha~ last raid on Tokyo. * They'd blown hell'out of the Hiyudori plane works on the outskirts, of Tokyo. But tiieir bomber caught enough flak to "force it down, two of the crew hilled, and the pilot died in Link's arms after the landing. They burned the bomber and scattered. The Japs caught Link. He didn't know about the others. The fact was that Link hadn't dared inquire about the other fellows on the bomber. He had not admitted he was on a bomber which had pasted Tokyo'. There was a rumor around that the Japs were shooting all captured flyers who had bombed Tokyo. Link had kept his mouth shut. The Japs had his name and tag number. That was all he'd (old them. It was all he was going to tell them, too. * * * BALDWIN broke into his thoughts. "That," said Baldwin, "is not what makes Americans act like i inside. "Arc there?" said Link in an L ,~ unfunny tone. ' "I mcap women ns a subject ot 1 conversation," Baldwin explained,;; "They should shoot you for men- ' lioning it." ;\, "Oh, now, I'm not being sadis- ; ' tic, old boy," Baldwin said. "I just i wondered if you wore married 1 ." Link grinned. "No. For some : reason, they don't take me sen-! ously. You know what a Great Dane dog is?" ; "One of those devilish big ani-' mals. Like a calf." ; "That," said Link, "is how I '. seem to impress the opposite sex.: Something amusing, and interesting to pet, but not an article you want to keep in the house. I think I I bound out at them or something, and they consider me loo playful." ; "Lucky," said Baldwin. "Or sort of serious, depending on how you look at—" He went silent, staring at Hie door. "Oh, oh, what's this mean?" The cell door was being tin- locked. A. Japanese officer stepped - Be Onyiiiiueil Head Courier News Want Ads. board of inquiry an extra player tilicia] barnacles lor scenes in "Two d on a "good week" he sonic-1 Years Before the JVIast." ncs averaged S10 in salary. The nc day a stunt man testified that a good day lie smnctimc.i made !00. ... A guy In Memphis wrote ib Hope asking for a loan of a illion dollars, and a girl in Bir- ingharn sent Bing Crosby a check $1.50 for "singing" like that. . A guy ts hired to make ar- WK FII.I. ALT. DOCTORS' PRESCRIPTIONS *w> SAvr. von >IONT,\ STEWART'S Drnf Stor e M«ln * I,»kt Phone 2822 FOB BALE CONCRETE STORM-SEWKR <U,I. S17.KS Chraper Than Rridcp l.nmlicr Osceola Tile & Culvert Co. Hume 691 Osccob, Ark. BLf WVIUE,M)lj Normally there are 80 lifeguards j at Coney Island. They watch ovet several million bathers each season. Mrs. DALTON C. FOWLSTON, B.A.. M.R.M, ORGANIST and TEACHER ot PIANO - ORGAN and VuiCJl Former New York Organist & Tench!-. Pur Appointment iUj Mrs. rowlston 1101 Chlckasawbi or I'hone 20tt 24 HOUR TIR1 SERVICE »'nir»nlilnf — Tire and Tube Repair! QC TV»t(ur Tires Onr Specialty. All Work Gnarantccd WADE COAL CO. Alabama R«U Ash Coat N. Hwy. 6T Ph. 2Z91 PLEASE RETURN EMPTY BEVERAGE BOTTLES TO YOUR DEALER To he able to serve you better, your dealer needs empty bevcrngc bottles. There arc plenty of bottles IF they are kept moving. Won't you please, return empty bottles to your dealer at once for your deposit or, better still, for credit on full bottles of your fav onto beverage. Koyal Crown nottl!nB Co. l>r. 1'cppcr Holding Co. I'cpsi-Cola Doltllng Co. Midwest Dairy Products f; o . Coca-Cola nettling Co.

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