The Miami News from Miami, Florida on November 19, 1983 · 51
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The Miami News from Miami, Florida · 51

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Saturday, November 19, 1983
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51
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- FULL LIQUOR BAR! BREAKFAST, LUNCH and DINNER SER ED DAILY 0 Berke le. oval eligi illiwy Forfar GIFT II Amur BOUTIQUE ....rut, CM Perking PREMISES Door Semis os 1200 3390 N.W. 36th St., HIALEAH OPEN DAILY 5 AMA Alt. thy the MOM SUN-1:30 PALI A.M. 638-3466 I 0 I 0 o1131,i Frank (Bruiser) Kinard lived up to his nickname Football has produced some great nicknames the Galloping Ghost, Crazy legs, Night Train. But few were as to the point as Frank Kinard's tag. He was simply "The Bruiser." That might stir up thoughts of a 300-pound, fire-breathing monster, but Frank Kinard played tackle and both on offense and defense for nine professional seasons weighing between 195 and 218 pounds. But he was still "The Bruiser." "The Brooklyn team used to have plays designed Just for the blocking of Kinard," said the late Joe Stydahu at the time of Kinard's induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971. "They'd get Frank out there against a defender and he'd Just mow them down. He made the work easy for the balicarrier." A staunch Mississippian from the day be was born to the present, Kinard came out of Pelahatchie to become a two-time All-American at the University of Mississippi in 1938-37. The second-round draft choice of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Kinard was a success In the National Football League from the start and was one of two rookies to be named to the all-NFL team in 1938. The other was Byron "Whiner" White. Playing for Brooklyn, Kinard made the consensus all-NFL team five of his seven seasons in Brooklyn. After playing the 1945 season with the Fleet City Navy team in California (where he won coveted all-service honors), Kinard signed with the newly formed All-America Football Conference. He is the only former all-NFL pick to have won all-AAFC honors. As player-assistant coach of the New York Yankees, he helped his club to two division titles in two seasons and in 1946 was honored on a Joint all-pro team selected by a wire service. Kinard retired from pro football at the age of 33 after the 1947 season to become an assistant coach at his alma mater. Two decades later he gave up his ranking as Johnny Vaught's top assistant to become Mississippi's athletic director, a position be held until be retired in 1978. During his professional career, Kinard missed only one game. Late in the 1941 season, Stydahar stepped on Kinard's hand. During the following week, Kinard developed gangrene. He sat out one game, but returned to the liaeup a week later although the fever from the illness was still present "We didn't have enough players for someone to be taking a vacation In mid-season," says the 69-year-old Kinard. "It was nothing special, everyone who played back then showed up for every game. If you got hurt too bad to play, you retired." ' HOWARD ULMAN Associated Press -....., Saturday, November 19, 1983 The Miami News '11 ew Englanzil Patriots - Former raggamuffins are on a roll under Meyer; - thinking playoffs as they try to raise record to 7-5 FOXBORO, Mass. Two years ago, the New England Patriots were 2-14. Last year, they disliked their new coach. This year, they lost four of their first six games. "We just have to approach the thing with the idea that the glass of water is half full rather than half empty and think about what it's going to take to win 10 games in a row," coach Ron Meyer said when his National Football League team was 2-4 and struggling. The Patriots won't win 10 games in a row, but they could win nine of 10. They are 6-5 and streaking. "We're definitely talking playoffs," Meyer said this week. "We've won four of our last five games, but I'd like to keep an even temperament because it's so fleeting." There are many reasons for the turnaround. The defense, a patchwork assortment of youngsters, is improving. The offense, with a league-leading ground game and quarterback Steve Grogan enjoying one of the best of his nine NFL years, has controlled the ball. New England has played all 11 games without cornerback Mike Haynes, a free agent who signed with the Los Angeles Raiders, its first 10 games without defensive end Ken Sims, the top pick in last year's NFL draft who broke his leg in the final preseason game, and the last seven without veteran linebacker Steve Nelson, who broke his thumb. "We struggled early because all of a sudden the guts of your defensive team were taken away from you," Meyer said. But in three of their last four games, the Patriots beat Buffalo 31-0 and 21-7 and Miami 17-6 last week. They held the ball at least 34 minutes and allowed fewer than 300 yards in each of those victories. "We're maturing. Our linebackers and secondary 1 We probably have as productive an offense as you'll see in the league today. I've always felt good about this team. Perhaps you feel better as you progress and are rewarded more with victories. Ron Meyer have really come of age, particularly against the run," says Meyer. who has softened his drill sergeant approach of last season. In five victories, the Patriots' defense, which has three rookies and three second-year players as starters, has yielded 93 or fewer rushing yards. Miami gained just 81. That forced Dan Marino, who began last week's game as the NFL's leading passer, to throw. "It's a combination of your entire team playing good, solid football and being self-complimentary. Your offense goes out there and stores, forcing their offense to get a certain amount of points," Meyer said. "If you can force a team to go upstairs to beat you. you'll latch on to a few of their passes." Grogan scored on a 1-yard run on New England's first possession, the Patriots stopped runners Andra Franklin and Tony Nathan, and Marino completed just 14 of 37 passes for 141 yards, one interception and no touchdowns. "We probably have as productive an offense as you'll see in the league today," Meyer said. "I've always felt good about this team. Perhaps you feel better as you progress and are rewarded more with victories." but Bob Golic is one player Patriots wish they had kept longer Associated Press FOXBORO, Mass. The New England Patriots "briefly thought of" switching Bob Colic from linebacker to nose tackle. Instead, they released him. Cleveland gave it a lot more thought. Now he leads the Browns' defensive linemen in tackles and should add to his total Sunday when he plays against his former National Football League team. "1 hold no animosity at all toward anybody in the administration of the (Patriots') club," Colic said this week, "especially since things worked out so well for me here." As a linebacker with New England, Colic was the team's second leading tackler In 1981. - But the Patriots were well stocked with young linebackers and nose tackles and released him late In their 1982 training camp. Two days later, Cleveland picked him up to shore up their depth at nose tackle. Using Colic at nose tackle "was briefly thought of," said New England Coach Ron Meyer, but the Patriots wanted to go with younger players and he's pleased with his nose tackle situation, with Dennis Owens as the starter. "1 wish we had the foresightedness to take a look at it." In his home town of Cleveland, Colic, 26, found that his experience as an outstanding wrestler at Notre Dame helped him adjust to his new position. "It's a perfect correlation between the two," he said. "They're the most complementary positions from opposite sports that I can think of. When I came here last year at 240 pounds I think that's the only thing that allowed me to survive. "I didn't have the upper body strength that I needed to control guys like (centers) Pete Brock (of New England) and Mike Webster (of Pittsburgh). But I did have the knowledge of balance, leverage especially, and how to control a man one-on-one." In Cleveland's fourth game last season, starter Henry Bradley hurt his knee and was replaced by Colic, who started the next game. Bradley started the following week but was reinjured, and Colic took over. Golic's been the starter ever since. Colic. New England's second-round draft choice in 1979, said that for about two hours after he was cut by the Patriots, he wasn't sure of his future. But then, "I came to the realization that I was going to be the one to decide when my career was over with," he said. "I wasn't going to allow somebody to make that decision for me." 1 04 ',,,-,t ' .-k-u! ir , ' 1. f,:' ,,FX 4 , . , th' .111::ii41,0 ; "We're mat on 1' ,, -,,v t ' ...E riir 0f. Nirlit 9 maturing. Our linebackers and secondary ries." s-4 t4 41 . -f ;-P, , .- - , i '4. , 4. t 4-440.-00-40 4.-,4,' t4.: - La.a....b.....fr...m...milea.,1;i4k.a:.1vAesLtet' e ' L .,...Z . b . Bruiser Kinard as a pro ut Bob Golic is one player . . Frank (Bruiser) Kinard Patriots wish they had kept longer . . Associated Press FOXBORO, Mass. The New lived up to his nickname vionlvye. thing that allowed me to sur reinjured, and Colic took over. Colic's been the starter ever since. England Patriots "briefly thought "I didn't have the upper body strength that I needed to control of" switching Bob Colic from line- Colic, New England's second- Football has produced some great nicknames the Galloping Ghost, Crazylegs, Night Train. backer to nose tackle. Instead, they guys like (centers) Pete Brock (of rotmd draft choice in 1979, said that But few were as to the point as Frank Kinard's tag. He was simply released him. New England) and Mike Webster for about two hours after he was "The Bruiser." Cleveland gave It a lot more (of Pittsburgh). But I did have the cut by the Patriots, he wasn't sure That might stir up thoughts of a 300-pound, fire-breathing mon- thought. Now he leads the Browne knowledge of balance, leverage es- of his future. stet but Frank Kinard played tackle and both On offense and de- defensive linemen in tackles and Po:tally, and how to control a man tense for nine professional seasons weighing between 195 and 218 should add to his total Sunday one-on-one." But then, "I came to the realizako pounds. But he was still "The Bruiser." when he plays against his former In Cleveland's fourth game last tion that I was going to be the one "The Brooklyn team used to have plays designed just for the National Football League team. season, starter Henry Bradley hurt to decide when my career was over blocking of Kinard," said the late Joe Stydahu at the time of Kinard's "I hold no animosity at all to- his knee and was replaced by Colic. with," he said. "I wasn't going to Induction Into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971. "They'd get Frank ward anybody in the administration who started the next game. Bradley allow somebody to make that dedout there against a defender and he'd just mow them down. He made of the (Patriots) club," Colic said started the following week but was on for me." the work easy for the balicarrier." this week, "especially since things A staunch Mississippian from the day be was born to the present, worked out so well for me here." Kinard came out of Pelahatchie to become a two-time All-American at As a linebacker with New England, -- Colic was the team's second leading t ,N, -.- -;,--;;-- .f.... -. -- the University of Mississippi In 1936-37. the US - 0, coNTINuG Arp tr: . The second-round draft choice of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Kinard tackler in 1961. was a success in e National Football League from the start and wu But th e Patriots were well is 1 k)or t N . UDE 4: of one of two rookies to be named to the all-NFL team in 1938. The other stocked with young linebackers and d0 LIVE ADULT k 6''''';-. I was Byron "Whiner" White. nose tackles and released him late Cnt's 1 ( INMENT Playing for Brooklyn, Kinard made the consensus all-NFL team in their 1982 training camp. Two k , VPO S,0 i C0 t , E".A NTERTA T--- I , i five of his seven seasons in Brooklyn. After playing the 1945 season days later, Cleveland picked him up to ir With the Fleet City Navy team in California (where he won coveted to shore up their depth at nose tack- 1 V r to , - , . , all-service honors), Kinard signed with the newly formed All-America le. ' 50V ' 10 -k 4'- Football Conference. Using Colic at nose tackle "was OS 74 , --7-11 He is the only former all-NFL pick to have won all-AAFC honors. briefly thought of," said New Eng- (j) Wig FULL ., ,, As Player-assistant coach of the New York Yankees, he helped his club land Coach Ron Meyer, but the Pa- .. to two division titles in two seasons and in 1946 was honored on a joint triots wanted to go with younger LIQUOR players and he's pleased with his all-pro team selected by a wire service. Kinard retired from pro football at the age of 33 after the 1947 nose tackle situation, with Dennis BAR! ' season to become an assistant coach at his alma meet Two decades Owens as the starter. "I wish we had the foresightedness to take a BREAKFAST, LUNCH and DINNER k I later he gave up his ranking as Johnny Vaught's top assistant to be- SEMED DAILY IL ' -4I come Mississippi's athletic director, a position be held until be retired look it it , In 1978. In his home town of Cleveland, serk.pur ma -- Colic, 26, found that his experience loow, Porbro, - es4;,4 4 GIFT During his professional career, Kinard missed only one game. Late s 4.-,,., BOUTIQUE ,1 OP4 ' i In the 1941 season, Stydahar stepped on Kinard's hand. During the foi- as an outstanding wrestler at Notre l a lowing week, Kinard developed gangrene. He sat out one game, but re- Dame helped him adjust to his new lireenty ruil Ing PREMISES i turned to the lineup a week later although the fever from the illness position. I. was still present I It a perfect correlation be- Door Semis os 12 00 4., , LI I "We didn't have enough players for someone to be taldng a vaca- tween the two," he said. "'They're 3390 N.W. 36th St., HIALEAH ,, the most complementary positions OPEN DAILY 5 AAA Alt. 14 ' I lion in mid-season," says the 69-year-old Kinard. "It was nothing spe- thy the seeett) I fr can P.M.1 cial, everyone who played back then showed up for every game. If you om opposite sports that I SUN. 1:30 LPL 638-3466 1S1... , . got hurt too bad to play, you retired" , think of. When I came here last i . , , . year at 240 pounds I think that's the - - j - - 4 i I I fl I I 1......, - v ikw!- - bi 1 ; , e , V v ,..,1 - - 4 4re r I r r so, ,,,' tt--s t 1 4 , ,k 6 ou , o , A. ' -- it., 4,40 ),..' So I1 4,4, , II' t 4 A 'k'. ' ' r fmA 1 ,.. 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'.. . ,,, - 1 , ji.,, , Ito '', 44. 14o4,-,,, it- i.- ( ,y)-,, 1 , . . 4., , , I rxek:, i.,,,, ktot.4414, s 3 4 - ' ' ).40,o,4444.,1 14 44,-. 4,-,,,,,,k,1 el 1 , ,, S'7771,,,,, 1 I.,,C4, 'ob., .,,,,t k 't ,o, 4 3 , , ,...,4,:,"0: '0; ,1....,,,, , 1 tr I t".s V I.7,,cA,44,-.go,,,. e' , 4 ' ,, it'''' s!: 4 ,.. 4,4zt 0 -- ,,,, .- ,, Yof it5,0-A, s,?.,1 a4 4 - ,,.: 114,, : , ,' 1 - -- ,,,,--..--.),-4-t,,,40,,,,'Sitojelv40 ;:.- A ' '1;ire' ,,i r- ' .) - ,, -,r t ',,,47 1 .,; i'' -1,0 , 4r.t)1,.; ii;aLr.:;;;A-1; la-,....;,....,.,;,,,;...,,612" " . ' ::illarif:'14to;14.144;; e- L. 1, Bruiser Kinard as a pro

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