Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on August 6, 1964 · Page 22
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Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 22

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Thursday, August 6, 1964
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Aftieiftefifs to THUW., AU& §» 19*4, tftk* at eags Beifs live up to the nte ot solid favorites ovef thi College StoMterridfty night'i g«m« Soldief Field they probably ll do it in the air. . Although the Bears woft the National football League title last year by ball control foot* ball, Bill Wade will be tefflpted to limber up his arm with a few bombs against the college bdys. "The AMtars may have trouble with their pass defense," said Willy Lemm Wednesday at the camp of his St, Louis Cardinals at Lake Forest, 111. Lemm should know for his , Cards scrimmaged the All-Stars last week, The Cardinal coach also thinks the collegians may not be "College boys' usually to, not havs mm training in *-"** Ing a passef," said .......... •fetching a boy to pass blade always is a teal probfefiUrt any tf& eafnfr Beeatifig.ths edllege teams do not throw the,ball as much as we do, they de not have to learn how to put on,a strong pass rush," . .' Otto.Graham, coach of the All-Stars, is well aware of the problems he faces in the ruggec • that yielded O iv. uo ... ov .— season to the toughest NFL attacks. Graham was encouraged by watching George Mlra of Mlam throw a few passes after being . v . mi of pming gtokta jellfot fltf flrtt tBtfe> R laid GFahm "1 ml mm bet* ttt. alter, seeing Miffi Wow 4 a Bears' defense last Petfe BeStnifd.'o! Southern JTBbC WdMICIllt i V* W dalifetnla is "the likely-. . miartetbaekjor the' collegians but Mlra and Jack Cflncahtion of Boston college .are •su?§4S see action, •• ? v''^' sh> ' On the theory that a s6tam- Wing quarterback like R6n Van< defKelen af thi Minnesota Vikings gave the Bears fits last fet Atigg QW' V w*iw *»*•*»*»» »*iw •.— . fall, the college boys are expect ed to try the rollout, "It Will be a rough night for both sides,V said Dick Evey, the K7bCll>0 C*LV> l/il*l*V, \* *w» < w p»««y evening, flffee s of thS eollegiani, pfb&abfy aft hliM tof start* *• fobs in*a« NFk .defensive leld after flie game, They are George ttess of Auburn (Minnesota) Mel Renffd of Ort* gon (Dallas) and. Jeffy : ,Rich* ardson of ( WestTfe*as.State ; (Lo9 Angeled),'" : s , '. ,'.'•. • .-„' , • fur All-Star ."running game will, open on Charley Taylor and Tony Lorlek'of Arizona State, Wlqlie Crenshaw of Kansas State and Matt Snell of, Ohio State, - - * - LOOK TOtfGH — Green Bay coach Vlnce Lombard! shows lino- backing maneuvers to offensive end Marv Fleming (81) as Gary Kroner (behind Lombard!) and Boyd Dowler (86) waich with interest. (AP Wire- photo), SPORTS IN BRIEF MOCKfiY ORD, McGuire, Whife Prepare for Olympic Trials Today __ — . «• i I^J iU- — «1 4* kArti 4vi iiimr\ )J oVlO Cfllfl hilt, fill 1C WEST MEDFORD, Mass. — Art R6SS, I 78, a Hall of Famer, and one of the.pi- oneers of modern professional hockey, died In a nursing home at the age of 78. GOLF , COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - Barbara Fay White of Shreveport, La., edflod June Hull of Anderson, ind., 4 and 3 tt advoneo to the quarter-tlnals of Ine Broodmoor Invitational, GLEN COVE, N.Y. — Mike Songster of Great Britain reached the quarter-finals Mets Deny Rumor Concerning Casey NEW YORK (AP) - Deter mined Edith McGuire, veteran Willye White and Improving young Eleanor Montgomery head a field of about 200 of this country's premier female athletes who began competing for - spots on the U.S. Olympic track and field team today. Each opens her quest for a 'berth on the team in preliminary events at Randall's Island •Friday, and only a major upset could prevent them from mak- Sach got at least one gold ,dal in the recent, best" American women's showing against the Russians In Los An- -geles, and Miss McGuire gained three. The Atlanta girl, a 20-year-old student at Tennessee State, won the 100 and 200-meter dashes She's ranked the gal to beat In both dashes and has been clocked In 11.5 in the 100 and 23.3 in the 200. She predicted it will take 11.3 or 11.2 to win in Tokyo but isn't too concerned about that: "First I've got to qualify in the trials." Her chief competition could come from Miss White, a 24- year-old Chicago nurse who specializes in the broad jump, Wyomia Tyus and Vivian Brown i of Tennessee State, and hurdler : Rosie Bonds of Riverside, Calif. : Miss White, who ran a leg on ; the winning relay team against I the Russians, has been timed in I ll 5 and probably will run on ] this country's Oiympic relay team. , ,. Her top event, however, is tne broad jump, in which she has jump," she said, but added:. "Broad jump, dash, relay, I just want to get another medal for this country in Tok yo." The 17-year-old Miss Montgomery, a Cleveland high school .- Moflltt of Long Btach, Calif., led the «• upsets scone tte bte of the Russian meet mcnt'by'dbwhlna Foye Urban SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - Mar shua, M.10, grabbed a stretch lead t beat Candallta by two lengths In th Schuylervllle Stakes at Saratoga. SALEM, N.H. - Singing Kalhy,,*», won LT «i"«5 r $ a te^ Rodham -- NPORT,N.J.- »7.60 mat ujjuwtu ~. ~. — _._„-_— —- . CHICAGO — wtr> B'» Sister, J18, beat when she won the high )ump_at Usino^ ^^dgo.^. coptur, 5-7%, turning back Russian captain Taisla Chenchik, winner of 0/ all five previous competitions booted between the two teams. | StSRos'Vbii MO?: , D ik &L LEAQUE LEADERS NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Mets denied .today an As- ociated Press report that they lad made a decision concerning Casey Stengel's return as manager-in 1965. And the San Francisco Giants were mum on the report that Alvin Dark would be dismissed as manager of their team. Casey's contract expires at the end of this season. Dark's contract expires Sept. 1. M. Donald Grant, chairman of the Mets' board of directors, commenting on an AP reporl that Stengel and the Mets wit reach a parting of the ways at the end of the season, said: "No decision has been made There has been no discussion as to whether or not Casey will re turn next year. We will not dls cuss it until the end of the sea BATTIN IATIONAL .LBA8US Plttsburflti, .: COrty, Mllwc,...-, .321) Aaron/ Mllwa en STS'LBJ no'll te an -m and run a leg on the winning re- j gone 21-6. She won the Olympic lay team, events in which the ' silver medal in 1958, but spipped , ' United States traditionally has pade its best Olympic showing. to 14th at Rome. Lee Could Be Rookie-of-Year LOS ANGELES (AP)--A 26- year-old righthander who languished In the Pittsburgh farm system for eight seasons before being sold to the Los Angeles Angels Is moving up to challenge Tony Ollva of Minnesota and Wally Bunker of Baltimore for American League "rookie of the year" honors. Bob Lee thought of quitting baseball last year when the Pirates demoted him to Batavia, W Y., of the Pony League, but today the 6-3, 225-pounder is about the hottest relief pitcher hi the majors. He hasn't allowed a run in his last 10 outings, a soair of 23 1-3 innings, and has afl;58 earned run; average for the year. The big fireballer's 6-4 won- lost record isn't much to get ex C M.,ab6ut, but he recorded was moved to the bullpen. In 43 relief appearances totaling 79 2-3 innings, he has a 1.35 earned run average, allowing 53 hits and 31 walks while striking out 72. Wednesday's triumph gave the Angel mound staff its second shutout in a row, its ninth in 29 days and its 19 of the season —tops in the league, A double by Lennie Green and a single by Jim Fregosi produced the third-Inning run that Central Area Duck Hunters Get Bad News WASHINGTON (AP) - Duck hunters in the Pacific and Central flyways got bad news Wednesday from the Interior Department, but prospects for birds in the rest of the nation were reported to be about the same as last year. Reporting that drought is still affecting the population of wild ducks in major nesting areas across the North American continent, the department summarized the national outlook this way: "There will bo a small de crease in the fall flight of ducks to the Pacific and Central fly ways compared with last year and. . . in the Mississippi ant Atlantic flyways flights will b about the same an last year." .733; 10-5, STRIKEOUTS- Koufo r , 191) Drysdalt, Los Angeie Pittsburgh, ... MarlchaT, San nesata, Fro Bal lith "save" of the year ednesday night as he shut out Baltimor e for three innings to down a 1-0 victory. The per preserved Dean snapped a six • game winning j Further flight forecasts by fly streak for Bunker (12-3) and'ways covering ducks, geese kept the Orioles one percentage i coots, were: point behind New York's league> »p acif i c fi yway _ duck-breed Ie 2i ers ; ... . , , ., ing areas within increased pro- The fourth-place Angels, trail- duction wiu not equal areas wUh ing by 9% games, have played - .... the hottest ball in the league since June 15, winning 34 and losing 17. If the standings were computed from that date, New York (31-19) and Baltimore (3220) would trail by two and a half games. 'formance ;Chapce'i seventh Victory ma, p on j er row and his 12th of the year . ' against five def^ts. The Angels purchased Bob ^ a conditional basis last winter , $keet * . . , p ace Louisiana Vt* •* »*>*•***«"»'•*•'•'"'• •--.-•' - , and employed him as a starting pitcher early this season. But be didn't really blossom until he RENO, NEVADA (Spl.)- Amite's Barbee Ponder and Lake Charles' Leo DeMoss Lake Arthur Rod C/wbTo scored well in the 20-gauge skeet shooting ^QiupeUtion here Wednesday. Bajrbee had 97 x 100 while Pe- had 96 x 100, Other Lo« decreases; a small decrease in the fall flight is indicated. Geese and brant — it is expected that the fall fight will be the same as last year for all species except the great basin Canada goose and brant, which will ed- crease a small amount, Coots-r no change from last year. 'Central flyway — ducks—increases in some production areas will not equal decreased production in other areas. A small decrease in the fall fllghl is forecast, Geese — the fall flight of all species of geese is expected to be the same as in 1963, Coots — small increase over last year. ''Mississippi flyway — ducks- breeding conditions are better than those in production areas 600 SERIES: Ken Johnson, 605. Women ., 185 LINES: Hattie Andrepont 208, Ollle FIGHTING WORDS — Casey Stengel of the New York Mets soundly denied that he will be replaced by a younger manager at the end of this season after Wednesday's contest at Shea Stadium, (AP Wlrephoto), Honors Are Well Divided in Play HONOR ROLL Men 115 LINES: Ellis George 232, Jones 222. Cllllon 123, Loll Me Hit Hoese 206, 500 SERIES) Shreve 520 507 The honors were well divided among bowlers in Lake Charles league play Wednesday. Ellis George and Ken Johnson * * * GREINWICH MEN'S Men's some: Roy Avalos, Ca. Marine, '"/tan's series: Avalos, 559. Team same; arbiters, 885. Team series: Pfblters, ?4W, Women's gqme: Qllle Hoese, HI Hopes, Women's series: Hoese, 509. Team game: HI Hopes, 618. Team series: HI Hopes, 1497. 206 split up the honors among the men. Performing in the Clipper League, George posted a 232 line and Johnson put together 605 series. On the distaff side of the jdger, three bowlers were over IB 200 mark, with Hattie Andre- lont's 208 leading the way, Ollie loese had a 206 and Mae Hill a 202, Andrepont also had the high series, a 523, while Lois Shreve posted a 520. , L. C. Anderson r-cked up the 6-740 split, while Jean PJke converted the 4*740 and Ann Harrington the 6-7. on when Casey will come to George Weiss (club president) and tell him what his plans are Wt •vvifnomir or next year. This has always been the procedure." Asked whether he would say ;hat Stengel can have the job as ..,.„_„ long as he wants, Grant ^•'piooa? wouldn't say yes or no. L«"|»» »o. A printed statement was distributed among the reporters before the start of the game between the Mets and Giants which, In effect, said the same thing. The statement concluded 1 . "Casey has always insisted on being free to decide on the following year at the end of the season, and the same procedure will be followed this year." Stengel, obviously disturbed by the story, told newsmen; "The AP is-not running my life and Reichler is not running my club." Dark's status remains unchanged. Horace Stoneham, owner of the Giants, who makes the decisions, has been silent and probably will remain so for some time, The Giants, sparked by Willie Mays' two home runs, defeated the Met* 44 but fell two games behind the league- leading Philadelphia Phillies, who swept a doubleheader from Houston. Dark, who had expressed his views In a Tuesday press conference on the controversial racial issue in which he had become involved earlier, had a short meeting with his players in the privacy of the clubhouse before the game Wednesday. "I let them know what I always believed and what I will continue to believe," he said. "That's all I can do, "The players did not ask any questions." FREE Mays, bothered by a head Tnu/iWr cold was not scheduled to play. ' u WINla Dark did not have his name on the original line-up card. Willie changed his mind about playing minutes before the start of the game. "I shouldn't be playing," he told the AP reporter, "but I've got to help that man. "All this should not have happened. "What are they trying to do?" i ._FWilliams waukrt. _ , RUNS BATTED IN - B6y»f/ St. Loutl, 78» Santo, Chicago, 75; Mays, san /ran. ciseo, 72; Torre" Mliwaukie, 68; Aaron, Milwaukee, 67. , . , HITS - Clem»nt& Pittsburgh, 14) Williams, Chicago, 139), Aaron, Milwaukee, 135; Flood, St. Louis, 132; Bayer, St. Louis, 130. ., ' . DOUBLES - Clement*. Pittsburgh, it; Williams, Chicago,, 27) May*, Milwaukee 25i Cardenas, Cincinnati and Alien, Phila- Louis M) at; Cincinnati at Phlladelphld Icago, TRIPLES - plnson, Cincinnati, «> Santo, Chicago,, 8; w. Davis,, LOS,, Angeles, calllson, fihliadelphla, Jtargell, >ltts- calllson, T^hliadefphla, itaraell, >ltls- burgh and Boyer and Brock, St. Louis, 7. HOMB RUNS — MaVs, San, Francisco, 31; Williams, Chicago, ,25; Santo, Chicago and Howard, Los Angeles, 20; Allen, Prill- TOLEN BASES - Wills, Los Angeles, Brock, St. Louis, 24; Harper, Clncln- I, W, Davis, Los Angeles and Aaron, Miller W/ns Two Joycee Matches MINNEAPOLIS (Spl.) - Bonner Miller, representing the Lake - Charles Jaycees, defeat-. ed Rosemarie Roblson, of Nevada in the International Jaycee Tennis Tournament being held here, 6-0,6-1, ' , Miller's second round victim] was Stephanie Berger of Hawaii,, 7-5, 7-5. ' , PITCHING (10 decisions) - Koulox, 14-5, ,76; Los Angeles, 14-5, ,76) Manorial, San Francisco, 1S-5, .750) O'Taale, Cincinnati, '" 1, • ,750) Sunning, Philadelphia,, 1H, I) Mahaffey ana Short, Philadelphia, i, .667. M, Los'Angeles, lies, 163) yeale, ', Cincinnati end fnjioney, *»tiit.iiui 'ranclseo, 144, , Mln- ata, .335; Mantle, Now York, .321; aosl, Los Angeles, ,314) B, Robinson, ltimore and All lion, Min Budgeted... Duuimorv una Aiiuun, mtnnvioia, »duo. RUNS BATTED-IN '^..Stuart, Boston and Killebrow, Minnesota, 16) Wagner, Cleveland, 78» Powell, Baltimore and Mantle, New York, 70. HITS - Ollva, Minnesota, 152) B. Robinson, Baltimore. 125) Bressoud, Boston and Versalles, Minnesota/ 119) Wagner, Cleveland, 116. DOUBLES — Bressoud, Boston and Oll- va, Minnesota, 27) Colavlto, Kansas City and Allison and Versalles, Minnesota, 24. TRIPLES — Yastnemskli Boston, Pro- gosl, Los Angeles and Versalles, Minnesota, 8) McAufilfe, Detroit and Ollva, Minnesota, 6. HOME RUNS - Klllebrew, Minnesota, 39) Powell,. Baltimore, 28! land and, Allison, Min Boston, 26. STOLEN -,~^,, more, 42) Wels, agner, Cleve- 27; Stuart, BASES - Aparlclo, Balti --• '•• ------ - r 14) Davamlo, more, ni weis, Chicago, 10; uavaiuio, Cleveland, is; Hlnton, Washington, 13; Wagner, Cleveland, 11. PITCHING (10 decisions) — Bunker, Baltimore, 12-3, .800; Ford, New York, 124, .750; Chance, Los Angeles, 12-5, .704; Plzarro, Chicago, 14-4, .700) Krallck, Cleveland and Newman, Los Angeles, 9-4, .692. STRIKEOUTS — Radatz, Boston and Peters, Chicago, .134; Pena, Kansas City and Downing, New York, 133; Wilson, i, 132. • "They fixed us up with a special payment plan created just for us!" HOME LOANS at IRST Boston, SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION LAKE CHARUSi J35 KIR BY SUlPHURi WASEY AT THOMAS ONE-DAY SERVICE IN AREA The prpgraro will include planning for a fwn4-ra|siog «p fccue OR 8rpt ?7 and a hunting safety program on August $• The gaiety program, to £$ «* 4«cte4 by members of the LP,U- VBdlife a®& Fisheries ssm, will be for youths islana scorers were JTew Roads' Joseph Beaud with 93, New Orleans' fienry Alcus with 92, Lake Charles,* Ron Bicfcen with 90, New Roadl' Joseph , -.•-,„. Beaud. Jr, with 90, Atblte's Con- will be the same as in 1963. way Guiteau with fi9 and Shreve' Coots — small increase over last port's Barney BamweU with Si year. supplying the Pacific and Central flyways and are about equal to Jasl year; no change in the flight Is forecast. Geese - the fall flight of all species in geese PBMOCBATIC Women's game: Haftlf Andrepont, AMI '"women's series: Andrepont, S?3. Team gome: Addjson's SM. Team series) Addlsont, U93> Women's Women's series: Hill Illl, $weet Peas Team same: $..— Team Mr lei: Sweet l, 507. ptos, S«. peas, U1Q- „ series: Ken Jeh™. Team game: Cagle, 933. Team lerlei! Jen»r" , . «"WiT !«*• Morrissey, Hall Play Next Week For Club Crown Sandy Morrlssey and Sam Hall will be battling next week for the Lake Charles Country Club President's Cup championship after battling their way into the finals. Morrissey took the measure of Ewell Stephens by a 2 and 1 margin, while Hall was the winner over Cleo Cooper by the same score. FACTORY REBUILT , MOTQRS AMb TRANSMISSIONS i. TO FIT ANY CAR/ NO MQNEY DOWN «FULW GUARANTEE!) SOUTHWEST MOTOR EXCHANGE RYAN 413 HE NIGHT HI 3-2225 Reddy Says; (WIGHT is p*icfif5S-eooo iiowr is ON SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 1964 VOTE NO. 46 ACRC WATSON FOR DISTRICT DIVISION D FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT QUALIFIED BY EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE 1. EDUCATION; B. A. Pegree Southwestera 4. Vlf SRMi W. I* All 1 2- FAMILY: Married with two sons. f, Plfltrlct Attorwy, U, No. 46 Vote For Watson For Judge No. 46

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