The Amarillo Globe-Times from Amarillo, Texas on August 12, 1977 · Page 43
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The Amarillo Globe-Times from Amarillo, Texas · Page 43

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Amarillo, Texas
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Friday, August 12, 1977
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Page 43
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r PUTT POWELL'S PUTTING AROUND 5 Amariilo Baseball Men Honored; Moore- Wartes Didn'f Play Fooffaa/f; Sooners To Meet Arkansas fn 7990 The Potter County Corhissioners established a plaque at Memorial Stadium in 1970. It was decided to honor deceased persons who have made unselfish and outstanding contributions to baseball in Amariilo. Ben Monning Sr, was honored at the start Five more have been honored this week. They are S. C. "Cas" Johnson, A. F. "Judge" Madison, W. S. "Bill" Eakens, Harvey Cliver and Hany Gilstrap. It was a well deserved tribute. I say with pride that all six men honored were friends of mine and had my all-out respect. They did everything possible to help baseball in Amariilo. I've never known a sports writer who loved baseball as much as Hany Gilstrap. He joined the Globe-News sports department in 1946. He wrote baseball until he was moved to another department in 1957. He remained with the paper until his death in 1969. Many nights Hany Gilstrap stayed until daylight writing baseball stories for the Globe-Times. It was an honor to know Harry Gilstrap and the newspaper business is v honored to have the name of Harry Gilstrap placed on the plaque at Memorial Stadium. It also was a fitting tribute this week for Ernie Banks to be installed in the BasebaD Hall of Fame. Banks gained his baseball fame with the Chicago Cubs. BuJ he played his first baseball in Amariilo. Johnny Carter had a team of black players called Johnny's Cabs in Amariilo in 1951. Johnny went to Dallas to bring a pitcher back to Amariilo. The pitcher told Carter about a young man selling peanuts at the Texas League park in Dallas. The pitcher said the young man had never played baseball but could really hit a softball. Carter also brought the young man along. The young man was Ernie Banks. Johnny's Cabs played most of the games away from Amariilo. Banks was spotted by the Kansas City Monarchs, a famous black team. The Monarchs bought Banks and then the Cubs secured his contract The rest is baseball history. Wonder if President Carter knows that Ernie Banks started out selling peanuts? . Don't sell Bob Moore short as a football coach just because he didn't play football. He was named head football coach at Dalhart High School for the 1977 season this week. He also is the head basketball coach. Moore played basketball at Amariilo High School, but didn't play football. Moore was on the same basketball squad at AHS along with Larry Wartes. ' Wartes didn't play football but was one of the most successful grid coaches. He coached Stamford to one state championship and had good teams after moving to Hereford. Wartes has been installed in the Texas High School Cteches Assn. Hall of Honor. Did you notice where Oklahoma and Arkansas had signed to meet in a football game in 1990? The Sooners and Razorbacks haven't played since 1926. OU holds the series edge with eight wins, three defeats and one tie. ; Ifs a natural rivalry with the schools recruit many of the same players. · » · -. ?·£· . . . . . . When Frank Broyles was in Amariilo ontfe, I asked him about bis Razorbacks playing the Sooners again. Brovles said Oklahoma wanted to play but he didn't For years and years, Broyles wasn't interested in playing any tough non(See PUTT POWELL OH Page 45) Friendly Little Feller --AP Wirephoto Midland Cubt pitcher Larry Groover contends !*ft-hander$ aren't necessarTflakes, and to prove it, he plays with his pet tarantula, cooing it with sweet talk, left, and giving it a daily run op his neck. He also scares the living daylights out of some of his teammates. The Midland Cubs are in Amariilo for a series with the Gold Sox Wafson's Mixed Bag Has Him Near Lead Flag PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. (AP) Tom Watson, caught in the middle of the Great Golf Club Controversy, literally has a mixed bag in the 59th PGA Championship. The 27-year-old Watson could have been excused if the events of this week had boggled his mind and caused him to lose confidence. But have no fear. Watson, winner of five tournaments this year including the Masters and British Open, lost his clubs en route to Pebble Beach when he flew one way and his bag went another. When th, clubs arrived, they were declared illegal because the grooves on the face of the irons did not meet U.S. Golf Association specifications. He messaged home to Kansas City for an older set, one with which he won the 1975 British Open. He looked at them and figured he had better find a backup set in case they also were ruled illegal. Watson sent an SOS to fellow pros for another set of irons. Roger Maltbie -responded with an extra set he carried .Truthe back of his car--a Silver Scot model that were at least 25 years old. Fortunately, for him, the set was available; Watson's own second set was disqualified.. So, using Maltbie's irons, fellow pro Page 43 GLOBE-TIMES Friday, August 12,1977 SPORTS Leonard Thompson's sand wedge and his own driver, No. 2 and No. 3 woods and putter--and with only eight practice swings, Watson fired a 68 Thursday over the famed Pebble Beach Golf Links. And he was only one stroke off the lead held by veteran Gene Littler at 67. "I'm not going to let it bother me," Watson said of the controversy over the illegal grooves in the irons which has caused at least eight players to have clubs disqualified. "There's nothing I can do about it" About the borrowed clubs, he said: "Whatever lack of confidence I had was dispelled on the first hole because I hit a great six iron on the first hole and made birdie." He needed only 27 putts, which, he said, "also helps to relieve any tension and anxiety I had over the clubs." He said he didn't particularly like the No. 2 and No. 3 irons and had planned to do some work on them before the start of today's second TENNIS IMPROVEMENT PART IV ConsistentNetGameNeeded Editor's Note--This story is the final installment m a five- part series on bow to improve your tennis game by staffer Jody Cox. Today's story takes a look at the net game. By JODY COX Globe-News Sports Writer Considered by many the most exciting part of tennis, especially for the spectator, the net game can be hard for an opponent to counter if it's consistent and not overplayed. "The problem with most people is they try to do too much with it," says Frank McAlpine, Amariilo teaching pro. "They swing and try to put it away on the first volley or they use their wrists to try to put spin on the ball." The volley can begin with the serve or with a weak return. A player intent on the volley advances to the net to try to stroke the ball before it bounces on his side, speeding up the tempo of the game to put pressure on his oppponent. "The first volley shouldn't be hit to put the ball away. As you're moving in, you want to set it up for the next shot so you can move in closer. Make it simple--the less you do, the better you are. They're doing the work for you." McAlpine teaches four things to remember in hitting the volley. "Keep the racquet head above the wrist and make contact with ball well out in front of the body. The shoulders should be turned and the stroke made with the wrist firm in a short punching motion with little backswing." One method of counteracting the voiley is a lob, a high arching shot hit deep into the court, but the player at the net can retaliate with an overhand smash. "People have a tendency to let the ball get over their round. "The grips are small and the shafts are weak but I like the feel of the clubs," he said. "I'm going to use them the rest of the week. I don't know how well Roger did but he's going to have to fight me to get them back." Maltbie shot a 70 over the 6,806- yard, par 72 course. The 47-year-old Littler, winner at Houston, was off the tour six weeks because of back pain caused by a degenerating disc, which he said, no longer bothers him. "I've had the pain maybe 10 times and it would go away in two or three days," he sail "When it didn't go away, I went to a chiropractor. It's been fine for about a week," Jerry McGee. winner in Philadelphia two weeks ago, played with Watson and also fired a 68, as did Mark Hayes, winner of the Tournament Players Championship at Jacksonville, Fla. in March. Jack Nicklaus, a five-time winner at Pebble Beach who was edged by Watson in the Masters and British Open, carded a 69, along with Lanny Wadkins and George Cadle. The parched Pebble Beach course, site of the Bing Crosby Pro-Am each January, proved hazardous for many in the field of 140, even though 28 played to par or better. However, 27 had scores of 80 or over, with Gary Campbell at the bottom of the field with a 91 Among some of the bettar known players, Johnny Miller shot a 70, Lee Trevino a 71, Arnold Palmer a 72, Hubie Green a 74 and defending champion Dave Stockton a 75. Danny Edwards was at par going into the treacherous No. 14, and six- putted, while Dennis Coscina was one under par going into 18 and took a 10, finishing at 76. UofPittGridder Gains Reinstatement PITTSBURGH (AP) - A University of Pittsburgh football placer, arrested last spring on drug charges, has been reinstated to the team by coach Jackie Sherill. Sherill announced the decision Thursday after junior Al Cbesley was put on court probation and cleared by the university's judicial beard. Chesley, a 6-4, 220-pound linebacker from Washington, D.C., was given probation without verdict in court last month. Injuries ue Cowboys THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (LJPI) Problems with depth in the offensive line and in the running tack corps plague the Dallas Cowboys before Saturday night's preseason encounter with the Seattle Seahawks. Coach Tom Landry Thursday placed four players on the injured reserve list, including running back Charles Young, a first-round choice in 1971 The others were 12th round draft choice Greg Poters of California, an offensive lineman who had knee surgery early in camp, and free agents Stu Beta of Northern Michigan and Mike Smith of Miami. Coach Tom fcandry said injuries in the offensive line and the backfield are his major concerns going into the Seattle game. "I fed our first offensive line can get the job done," Landry said, "but with the loss of Rayfield Wright (a right tackle who underwent knee surgery) and Blaine Nye (a right guard who retired) we need one or two rookies to step forward and give us some quality depth." "'Jim) Jensen and (Secedridt) Mclntyre are the only two backs who have been healthy all the way through camp," he said. "This durability factor worries me a little bit because we have to have running backs who can play day in and day out" Landry said Doug Dennison and Scott Laidlaw are probable starters at running back in Saturday night's game. Dennison, the club's leading rusher in 1976, and No. 3 nuher Laidlaw will replace Robert Newhouse and Preston Pearson, who are nursdng minor teg injruies. Landry said, second-year fullback Jensen and Mclntyre, a rookie free agent from Auburn, would get plenty of playing time against the Seahawks. Roger Staubach win start at quarterback. Second-string quarterback Danny White is scheduled to relieve Staubach in the second half. Landry said quarterbacks Steve DeBerg, a loth-round draft choice, and Glenn Carano, second-round choice, would play sometime during the game. The Cowboys were scheduled to conduct a brief workout today before flying to Seattle. They win return after the game for their last week rf preseason training camp at California Lutheran College. 8 Games on Tap In NBC Tourney WICHITA, Kan. (AP) -- The Eureka-Humboldt Crabs of California erupted for seven runs in the fifth inning to post an 8-5 victory over Gretna, La, Thursday night in the National Baseball Congress Tournament Earlier in the evening, Grand Rapids, Mich., throttled Valdosta, Ga.. 15-1, and defending champion Fairbanks, Alaska, breezed past Sherwood, Tenn., 12-0. Eight games are on tap for Friday: Tampa, Fla. vs. Sherwood, Tenn.; Buchanan, W. Va. vs. Mount Vernon, Ohio; Hutchinson, Kan. vs. Jackson, Miss., Gretna, La. vs. Valdosta, Ga.; El Dorado, Kan. vs. Bethlehem, Pa.; Anchorage, Alaska vs. Houston, Tex.; Clarinda Iowa vs. Kenai, Alaska, and Boulder Clarinda, Iowa vs. Kenai, Alaska, and Boulder, Colo. vs. Hays, Kan. MoBU Cox's two-run single and Steve Till's three-run homer keyed the Eureka-Humboldt onslaught Gretna starter Wayne Silva was effective for the fifth, giving up five of his eight hits in that inning. Glenn Masson had a solo home run for Gretna. In the first game, Grand Rapids scored seven runs on six walks and Randy Johnson's three-run homer in the second to thump Valdosta. The Georgians managed but four hits off two Grand Rapids hurlers. In the middle contest, Fairbanks' Tim Leary and Tom Lukish combined to no-hit Sherwood. The Alaskans got three-run homers from Tim Tolman and Boh Woodside. Both the first and second games were called in the fifth inning because of the NBC's 10-run rule. . . . _ , , ,, . , , --Staff Photo by R06WT MUIHERIN Lining op the ball for an ovcrheac smash . . . T Bar M Racquet-Club teaching pro Gary Childress. heads," says Gary Chtldress. Amariilo T Bar M Racquet Club oro. "The main objective in preparing to hit the overhead shot is to get deeper in the court than the ball." Childress advocates turning and running to achieve this depth, much in the manner of a pro quarterback setting t:n to pass. "It's the best way to get into position, because it sets you up for the shot" Backpedalir.g. the method many novices use, is not only slower, but also puts you off-balance, Childress says. "You should line the ball up with your forehead and then swing like you would in serving, stepping into the bail. That forward step can lead to going back to the net' After reading tfm week's five- part series on the basics of tennis, you've got a workable knowledge of the five fundamental strokes of the game. The excitement of competition, the pure psychology of the tactics and strategy and the good exercise of the gane of tennis can be yours--if vou practice. LIQUORS Two Locations: 2510 West 6th v l 815 Amariilo Blvd. Bast GIIBEY'SGIN Q99 16 proof, 100% grain $Hi U Charter? 559 i* proof, bowrbon whbk«y .5* U 509 ue 10 proof, boafton wh«k«Y q». Crown Russe Vodka Q49 80 proof, 100% ntwfrol «p4riH qt. W Segranvs ] Crown tO pfcof, bfcndod whlikey ,, 5 39

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