Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on July 25, 1964 · Page 13
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Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 13

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Lake Charles, Louisiana
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Saturday, July 25, 1964
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Page 13
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8 9 13 14 IS 17 Ifl 20 21 23 24 25 26 28 30 31 32 36 38 39 40 41 42 44 45 ,48 '.& S3 •& '•5 ACROSS Personal interest Play tricks Scare away Woodwind Prize contest: ancient Greece Dried coconut meat Iron pyritesi 2 words Essence of roses Walks: ilang Political party division: 2 words Distribute Play the lead Lawsuit, in Spain Farm implement Samuel Pepys, for one Race a motor Pert girl Pulls by the nose Windflower Describing certain foods Esprit de corps Units of measur* Is able to Colonist Nota — Speedy Timber tree Word on a towel Follower Smaller Mild cigar All ears Money drawers 59 Kind of sign ,» 60 Stir up A «1 Turkish ji governor! ef. 62 Weight allowance 63 At the very least DOWN 1 Living room item 2 Black 5 Inspects: 2 words 4 Research student 5 Sprees 6 In the past 7 Payment to vote: 2 words 8 Make beloved 9 Leave hurriedly 30 Trouble: 2 words 11 Relating to vision 12 Praying figure ]R .Tason's ship 18 Fasten with stitches 22 Waste piecemeal Puzzle of Friday. July U, Solved I 24 Without: L«ti« 26 Gocart, in London 27 Marqulsett* 28 Eating place 29 Clout 31 Burrower 33 Augmentation ( 34 Tatar chieftain •' 35 Auld Jang — 37 Thoroly skilled 38 Look for 40 Praise excessively 43 Leaseholder 44 Small restaurant 45 Actual happening 46 Done spontaneously: 2 words 47 Laminated rock 40 Fowl 51 Antarctic sea 52 Supplied 53 Malefic 54 Bank on 57 Digit Automakers Post Record Earnings NEW YORK (AP)-The big three automakers are earning more money than ever before. General Motors Corp. and Chrysler Corp. reported that profits and sales soared to record levels in the second quarter and first half of this year. Ford Motor Co. issued a similar report earlier in the week. Death Toll In Egyptian Ship Blast Hits 40 ALGIERS (AP)-The Egyptian ship Alexandria sank Friday after an explosion ripped through the vessel and caused heavy fire damage to the surrounding harbor area in the port of Bone. The newspaper Alger ce Soir said 40 persons were killed and 105 wounded in the blast and fire, and said there was no estimate of casualties among the crew ef the ship. Government inspectors were sent to Bone to determine if sabotage was involved. Most of the dead and injured were believed residents of the neighborhood adjacent to the dock area, where several buildings, including a hospital, were heavily damaged. Soviet and Bulgarian medics doing relief work in the area were summoned for assistance. Witnesses were quoted as saying a series of explosions was heard late Thursday night from deep inside the iron-hulled ship and that a fierce fire raged through the vessel. Explosions continued inside the ship as she settled into the water and finally sank about dawn. Sources on the scene said the oxplosions indicated the ship was carrying ammunition. The ship had left Algiers a few days earlier. Bone is 260 miles east of Algiers, near the Tunisian border. General Motors' sales and earnings were the highest ever reported by any company. Its chairman, Frederic G. Donner, and president, John F. Gordon, attributed the surge to expansion in economic activity and resulting consumer confidence. The Big Three's reports of great prosperity came while they were negotiating with the United Auto Workers on new labor contracts. General Motors earned $602 million, equal to $2.11 a share, in the three months ended June 30, compared with $464 million, or $1.62 a share, in the second quarter of 1963. The previous record was $536 million, or $1.87 a share, in the 19G4 first quarter. First half earnings of the No. 1 automaker totaled $1,138,000,000, or $3.98 a share, compared with $878 million, or $3.07 a share, in the 1963 first half, which was the previous record. Sales totaled $5,082,000,000 in the 19(54 second quarter against $4,516.000,000 a year earlier. First half sales of 59,868,000,000 compared with $8,663,000,000 in the 1963 first halt, the former record. Chrysler, third ranking automaker, earned $60.6 million, equal to $1.61 a share, in the three months ended June 30 against'$41.7 million, or $1.13 a share, a year earlier. First half earnings totaled $114.4 million, or $3.05 a share, compared with $77.9 million or $2.11 a share, in the 1963 first half. Chrysler sales in the second quarter rose to $1,071,000,000 from $890 million a year earlier and in the first half to $2.062,000,000 from $1,687,000,000. Ford's profits in the second quarter amounted to $179.7 million, equal to $1.63 a .share, on sales of $2,672,600,000. This compares with $55.9 million, or $1.41 ' a share, on sales of $2.544,700,000. Jn the first half, Ford's earnings were $324 million, or $2.93 a share, compared with $277.2 million, or $2.51 a share. Sales : rose to $5.088.200.001) from $4.434.100,000. Black Bear Moves In Near N.Y. City NEW CITY, N.Y. (AP)-A black bear has moved into a field in this commuters' suburb 25 miles from New York City. "At first, I was absolutely terrified," said Mrs. Harry Steinger, whose borne is on lie edge of the field, "but how long can you be absolutely terrified?" The bear was first seen this week. Apartraenis and houses border three sides of the field. The fourth is open u> the woods. Pulice said they can't do anything unless the bear becomes a menace. Game wardens plan t<> try 1- trap the beast. Go/den Gofe Is Aim Of Horse Rider SALT LAKE CITY lAP) Justin Little Bit of Houston, , Tex., is in Salt Lake City on a 4,000-mile trip by horseback to San Francisco — via Indiana po- ',lis. : "I'm going to ndt- across the 'Golden Gate Bridge on a 1 horse," Bit said. His motto is: "Just a Little Bit goes a lung way." Bit's bigge.-t wi.-rry was having his hur.f. Dandy Cody. shnd. Dandy has worn out 28 sets sirice the start ui tne trip. 2h years ago. Bit. a former bull rider un liiC- I'L'di.-n Cin:U:t. -|ji !i! ! All SYLVIA...CANCEL MV APPOINTMENT IN CLEVELAND.'1 HAVE MORE URGENT BUSINESS ELSEWHERE/ HERE'S'WURPLANETICKeT N „-... FOR CLEVELAND?, MR HAfTDENN.' ) 1 GUESS V3U DON'T HAVE MUCH TIME/ VX'DONTJ JOE PALOOKA DOGS EAT AS£,O THEV? OH, VE5..,r DON'T KNOJ OIHV. BUT THW D0~ JUST. WHAT I' uANTep..,A BOWL Of SOT SOMETHING PEANUTS TAINT SQ.SON. 1TSEI.F,|SKINDAONE SHMOO -JESTA-SETTIM' MTHETBLACK tHAFUJNDER US— GMN'USTH'BESr NOT A ftlMGLC LIVE SHMOO LEFT IN TM'VALLEY III' ABNER ALL THE WHOOPLA _ PRETTY &KS AH ACTOP SINCE EVEIzy OTHER , I WAS A KIP, I MISHT IS /YWNUFACTUREP STUfffJ WHEN THE 7 '** POTEET.' 'IP I '. THIN6 YOU'KE A MOVI6 I---WELL.WHY TAKE MY PLACE IN STEVE CANYON I KNEW IT WAS A MISTAKE TO BEST MAN ANDY CAPP CALL ME WHEN THE DANCE IS OVER AND I'LL. . PICK YOU UP-- TEEN-A6ERS 6HOULDNT BE ' OUT TOO LATE BLONDIE SOME; OF THE KIDS'PARENTS WILL DRIVE us ; / i FORGOT TO TELL you } I V. THERE'LL BE SOME OLD ^n PEOPLE THERE OLD i; ,$M .^f I DON'T UNDERSTAND IT- I LOOK AT ,„,/ MV FACE EVERV } MORNING AND -..^ I DON'T J .», I NOTICE IT • GETTING ._ r OLD ^ ' r .j- 1 WHAT'i I >A-F N I OUS TRAVELLING r " rt,TH *^U V COMPANION, I SnALL ^ i-'*i- I , *S,1"AV \AJiTU Tt-t •" it, f .». f- >~ * n. -T 1 i •- *. *. r- i ^ ^ i/^ 7 fi 11 n i r i r v\. / AE CAN T LfAVE ! CV\... UK 1AKC • _ —7 i '£,V\ WITH US.' /fy GJ--- _./ A\P His MEN WILL ENJC/ 7«£ H,.-'5?ITAMT/ OP THE UNPEK- . 6ROUUP. ONCE ycuR VMS' TH£/ NOT &t TMEM FOS Focol w. STUL J ht«e. i AM TO SfOi>.£. Vr"-f ' f't EXPC^'tP / SMUGGUN"-" rnon'K w:th dianapohs en In cr M,3Rt£ OR NOT.' I , CANNOT &EE i ThtM SUFFER j AKY LOfvjER.' k j DAN FLAGG SAT., JULY 25, 1964, Lokt Charles Ameficon Preis -Junior Editors Quit on- HYGIENE MAKE WONDERFUL EVERCISE : How does exercise mqkt our bodies grow? * * * * ANSWKK: According to jidentljt.1, our bodies grow by wh»t happen* Inside the cells of which thwe bodies me composed. Each cell takes In materials 1'rom the oukldc, turns them Into the woadriftil jubstaiicr. "protoplasm. 1 As the cell grows It multiplies by dividing. This process Is growth. The materials for Rrowth come from our fond K.vercijc is a great aid to health and growth became it help* keep the bodily liinrUons on the Job. Vor Instance, It catnejr the heart to pump last and this In turn keeps the blood circulating at a good lively clip. It Is In the blood stream, (1), thut the highly Important lood materials (2) are carried around jo lhat the rellj run use them to repair worn out tissue and make more, (3), (4), Kxerdse also builds larger and stronger muscles; It gives, us Rood poshite and keeps our skin a fine healthy color. So many things are done by machine nowadays that we've loit much of the natural exercise w« vised to have. A lew years ago a man would »aw a. board with «. band saw; now, he's apt to use a power tool.' But fortunately, most ol us love sports, one <>1 the lines! ways to get the exercise we need. » • • 7-^r VOR YOU TO 1)0; I'racticc this summer to Improve yourself In your lavorlte spoil. (Ronald Johnson of MrtywoocI, 111., wins today's combined prfct of C.omplon'.i. Illustrated Science Dictionary plus $10 cash for thii question. Mail yours on a postcard to Junior Editors In care of this newspiipcr and you may wlft the weekly grand prize of Comploa't 1'lclurcd Encyclopedia.) Mounting Hunger Crisis Hits India BALLS 0* FIRE!! SHERIFF TAIT'.! \I CAN'T TAKE OFF VOU NEEP TWO | THAT LONG, DOC WEEKS VACATION- THAI'S WHAT I PER5CRIBE TAKEOL'SNUFFV ALONG WIF VE SNUFFY SMITH 60HOM£! gOOHOOOof!' »'••". i "• ;i • i»(,rr Tjw \ BRENDA STARR V.T.L IT / MY FRisips SHA:I BE INFORMEP ANDTHESeRGfcANr NEW DELHI, India (AP)Prime Minister Lai Rahadur Shastri's government is foesel by a mounting food crisis and a Communist scheme to capitalize on it, raising fears that a wave of violence will sweep India's I hungry millions. The pro-Moscow leader of India's splintered Communist party said Friday a nationwide demonstration will be staged next month to protest sharp price rises and short supplies of wheat, rice and other basic items in (he slim Indian diet. S. A. A. Dangc, chairman of what calls itself the Communist party of India but which lost about 40 per cent of its membership last April in the split with the pro-Peking Reds, told newsmen the mass agitation effort will be launched Aug. 24-28. He said the pro-Chinese Com- j rnunists and all other opposition ! elcmenls will be invited to join • the protest against (he govern- 1 merit's failure to check food' , prices—which an official survey < j shows spiraled 12 per cent in! j New Delhi in May and June, \ \ Any price increase is immedi-! lately fell by India's ragged' i masses, who always are hard- i pressed to earn enough to keep i from starving. i With Indian Communist ranks split wide open and famine threatening some remote regions, the pro-Moscow leader clearly is trying to use the grave food situation and empty stomachs to make more trouble for Shastri's new government, and improve his faction's political stock. Authoritative sources said government leaders are worried that a Communist-led protest next month might touch off widespread bloodshed. They said a major effort is planned to increase food supplies and lower prices before the demonstration. There have been a number of demonstrations, lootings of grain dealers and near riots, and food lines have grown steadily longer and tempers shorter. A young farm woman staggered into a west Indian village two days ago and dropped dead of starvation while waiting in a line lo buy grain. In Hyderabad, a man stabbed another to death in a fight over who was first in a line. Together with the fact that India still is far from agricultural self-sufficiency, the food shortage arid high prices are blamed on the poor- spring harvest and heavy monsoon rains that ruined thousands of acres. NEA Reports Progress /n S/ow/ng Dropout Rote . WASH1N(]TON iAP)~The I National Education Association I said Friday the 128 biijgest cities have made progress in steni- .niing school dropouts but "they '.still have a long wa/to go." ! Since 19GO, the NBA said, the "holding power" of the large , dty school systems has risen 2.5 I per cent compared with a national iii'Tease of 1.6 per cent. Two- thirds of the school sys- i terns showed gains during the four-year period 19W) through The NKA study said that the holding power rate of the iy*J3 : class of the combined school j systems stocxl at 70.8 per cent. The national average was 76 per cent. Holding power was defined as j the ability of schook to retain i students from a specified grade through graduation. The rate | refers to the number of students out of 100 who still are in school from grade 10, the one used in Triceratops Find Is Being Dug Up : MARMAHTH, N.D. iAH>~- University of North Dakota geologists aro trying to dig up the remains of a dinosaur believed to be 80 million years old. The partially exposed skeleton ut a tneeratops was iound by a student mapping an area of i southwestern North Dakula last summer. The beast appeared to be about 20 fct-t long and 10 feel said Prof. F. D. Holland. (the study, until completion of ! high school at grade 12. ! "Generally, holding power rates are inversely proportional to she of city— the larger the city the lower the holding power 'rate," the NKA said. j The study, called the first ma- :jor one of its kind, covered cit- lies ranging in size from New ;York with more than seven mil- ilion people to Burbank, Calif., I with about 90,000. A total of 150 i school systems were queried jand 128 responded with data, ! NEA said. Expansions Contracted For Pipeline HOUSTON, Tex. (AP) - Contracts have been awarded for a (50 million expansion of the i pipeline system the Tennessee Gas Transmission Co. operates from Texas to New England. J. L. Parrish Jr., vice president, announced awarding of the contracts Thursday and said i construction work will begin ! soon. The pipeline contracts include: Grayco Constructors Inc., 82 - miles of 36-inch pipe in MLssis- jtuppi, Alabama and Tennessee. New compressor stations will be at Carii&le, N.Y., and Grand Chenier, La. All the work is scheduled (or •completion Uus >ear. »

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