Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on October 5, 1976 · Page 2
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Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 2

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Garden City, Kansas
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Tuesday, October 5, 1976
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Editorial Page 4 Garden City Telegram Tuesday, Oct. 5,1976 Ford Off The Hook Earl But? has taken President Ford off the hook by resigning, as he should have. The President through no fault of his own was in a no-win position from the beginning. If Ford had to fire Butz, he ran the risk of alienating those farmers who supported the Secretary of Agriculture and felt he had done a good job, although it is doubtful Butz had much support left after his racist remarks saw the light of day. But if he kept Butz, which was unthinkable, it would have been an affront not only to blacks, but to all Americans who find no humor in racial slurs. Some Republicans, including Bob Dole, while criticizing Butz, attempted to mitigate the damage by declaring there was not much difference between Butz's remarks and what Carter said in his now notorious Playboy interview. That comparison is ludicrous. Carter was candid, probably too candid, about a human frailty that probably affects most men at sometime in their life. He was indiscreet in using earthy language. Butz degraded blacks by stereotyping them in a most despicable way. It is not the first time he has offended an ethnic group w.ith his barroom humor. The most surprising thing in Butz's resignation statement is that he said he had no pressure from the White House. That's hard to believe, but if true, it simply reflects obvious White House strategy. Ford kept his fingers crossed and played a waiting game, hoping Butz would take him off the hook. Ford came out smelling like a rose, alienating nobody, except possibly those who thought Butz should have been -fired on the spot. </ // <v7 6taW^_)t,ae , _ A MIXED Bag. . . :: • • ,. • WILD LIFE. A coyote, as any native of this prairie country knows, is a wolf-like animal that howls at night. COYOTE also is an organization — Call Off Your Old, Tired Ethics — to promote legal challenges to anti-prostitution laws. * * * SPORTS. It's not much, but. . . Our third daughter who is a senior at Ft. Hays Kansas State College lives across the hall from a coed who was the high school girl friend of Nolan Cromwell, University of Kansas star quarterback. Nolan's picture is on,display in her room. * * * EDUCATION. "Sociologists have long maintained that college is a time for experimentation, for breaking out of the inhibitions imposed by one's parents, and for abolishing the limitations on one's capabilities. But we of the college generation know that it is actually a time for clambering back into the womb. "College is really an ivy-clad womb with a view, where one is free to kick and squirm without perturbing any sensitive stomachs." — by an anonymous college student. * * * LUST. The most popular four-letter word in current events. Our first encounter with the term came long ago in our childhood religion classes. We learned the Seven Deadly Sins which (if we remember straight) are: Pride, Covetousness, Lust, Anger, Envy, Gluttony and Sloth. * * * HORTICULTURE. There's another potted plant book on the shelves — "Never- Say-Die House Plants." It's by Elvin McDonald. In our house plant book, "Mother Earth's Hassle-Free, Indoor Plant Book," the authors, Lynn and Joe Rapp, say "We've got to accept the jdea that plants just up and die for no apparent reason." Garden City Telegram Published daily except Sundays and New Year's day. Memorial day, Independence day. Thanksgiving day, Labor day and Christmas. Yearly by The Telegram Publishing Company 276-3232 310 North 7th Street Garden City, Kansas 67H4B 'Fr«d Brooks John Frazler Le Roy Allman Editor c Managing Editor Ad and Business Manager Crossword By Eugene Sheffer ACROSS 1 Fall behind 4 Among 8 Sign of healing 12 Broad sash 13 Vocal quality 14 Interlaced 15 Humorous drawings 17 Imitates 18 Belgian watering place 19 Used in paving roads 21 A marshal of France 22 Inhabitant 26 Customs 29 Curve of ship's planking 30 Fish 31 Mine entrance 32 Born 33 Revolvers (slang) 34 To gut fish 35 Kitchen utensil 36 Sovereign's decree 37 To introduce 39 Sainte (abrr.) 40 Luau dish 41 Kettledrum 45 Pianist Peter 48 Headlike in form 50 Dry 51 Author Ludwig 52 Diminutive of Edward 53 Leaf of a book Avg. solution 54 Cock-horse (Fr.) 55 Spanish queen DOWN 1 Crazy (slang) 2 Sleeveless garments 3 Encircled by a girdle 4 Expiates 5 Pensive 6 'Hostelry 7 To ordain 8 A throng 9 Spool for thread time: 24 min. 'Anything YOU can flip. I can flop belter ywhere better than you!" TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION By wirier a. month in (iarden City $2.43 plus applicable soles tax. Payable to the carrier in advance. , By carrier in other cities where service is available JI.94 a month plus applicable sales tax. By mail 124.72 a year including postage and applicable sales tax. Local and area college students $1,1.91. including postage and applicable sales tax for 9 month school year. By motor car delivery per month (2.76 including applicable sales tax. Memberofthe Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP newa and dispatches. All v rights of publication of special dispatches are also reserved. Jack Anderson Missiles to Saudi Arabia WASHINGTON - It took Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's personal intervention last week to overcome a congressional effort to block the sale of 650 Maverick air-to-ground missiles to Saudi Arabia. Not mentioned in the public discussion was that the Saudis will now be able to exchange missile fire with their two principal rivals in the Middle East, Israel and Iran, which have already purchased Maverick missiles from the United States. Classified documents show, however, that the Saudis originally wanted 1,000 of these sophisticated missiles. A secret study by the General Accounting Office also shows that the popular Maverick should be better suited for the sunny Middle East than for murky Europe. Nevertheless, the Pentagon has approved Maverick sales to our European allies. The Maverick air-to-ground missile is guided by TV sights, which function literally as the missile's eyes. Weather and lighting, therefore, are important factors. According to the secret GAO study, the Maverick's "vulnerability to enemy defenses could significantly affect (its) effectiveness in the European environment." The missile, with its not-always- seeing TV eye, performed well in Europe. But the tests, according to the GAO, didn't take into account the "operational suitability factors." Warned the study: "The overall success of the Maverick system in Europe could be less than the success rate reported if these factors were considered." An enemy could be expected, for example, to use smoke and smog to blind the Maverick's TV eye. But in West Germany, where most of the tests were conducted, there are regulations against smoking up the atmosphere. "The use of smoke as a counter-measure," notes the secret report, "was severely limited during this evaluation because German regulations prohibit its use when aircraft are overhead." Because of German range restraints, the attacking missile-carrying planes were also obliged to conduct simulated strikes. Sensitive instruments recorded how effective the Maverick'would have been against actual targets. Air Force officials assured -the GAO that all factors had been assessed in previous tests and that the Maverick was deadly against tanks, personnel carriers, parked planes and other ground targets. Footnote: The GAO report also was critical of the Pentagon's paperwork in the handling of the Maverick program. SOUTHERN AFRICAN AGENT: Two prominent congressmen recently took up the cause of South Africa on the House floor without mentioning that part of their speeches were written word for word by a South African agent. One congressman didn't even know it. Rep. Philip Crane, R.-I11., who is considered one of the brightest members of the House said he thought the speech came from the conservative Republican Study Committee. The committee got the speech, however, from Donald deKieffer, a registered foreign agent for South Africa. The committee pawned off the speech on Crane without saying where it came from. The second congressman, John Dent, D.-Pa., admitted he knew deKieffer had prepared the speech. Dent explained that he was rushed and "wanted to get whatever canned heat I could get" into the debate. The two identical speech sections opposed a resolution that Rep. Stephen Solarz, D- N.Y., had offered. It called upon the United States to deny recognition _ to- Transkei,. a vassal-black state'created ; by South Africa. DeKieffer conceded to us that he had written the key passages and passed it out for use on Capitol Hill. He also admitted that he had failed to label the material as coming from a foreign agent, which is required by law. He said both Republican Study Committee head Ed Feulner and Rep. Dent were already aware that he was a registered South African agent. Footnote: The South African embassy also passed out some of deKieffer's material on Capitol Hill. We have learned that A. S. Hoppenstein, an embassy counselor, dropped off the data at strategic offices. WASHINGTON WHIRL: Secretary of State Henry Kissinger reported to President Ford after his return from Africa that he found black leaders far more moderate in private than in public. Apparently, they feel they must sound militant in their public statements. Kissinger is pushing Rhodesia to accept a black prime minister, chosen by the heads of the surrounding black states, as soon as possible. The sooner this is done, he advised, the less likely it will be that Russia will interfere with Rhodesia. — President Ford has been calling for the defeat of the Democrats in Congress. But at a closed-door meeting with congressional leaders last week, he wished them "a good election" and told them: "Hopefully I'll see you back in January." — House Speaker Carl Albert pushed hard behind the scenes to get the House out on : time. He told President Ford at a closed leadership meeting: "We're not going to be bogged down by unimportant bills." Bugging Device In Mayor's Office WEBB CITY, Mo. (AP) — An electronic bugging device discovered in the office of Mayor Sterling Gant will be one of the topics facing the Webb City council at its regular meeting tonight. Councilman Donald Darby said he requested the action because of what he termed "a coverup" by city officals in connection with the incident. Richard Ribinski, city administrative assistant, refused Sunday night to discuss the matter. According to reports, Ribinski discovered the device in a telephone in the mayor's office. Police Chief Robert Studivan Sunday night said the matter had not been reported to him. Art Buchwald Writes: The Rose Garden Problem WASHINGTON — .One of Jimmy Carter's main complaints about running for President is that his opponent, Jerry Ford, is hiding in the Rose Garden of the White House, while Mr. Carter is being covered 24 hours a day by the media he says Mr. Ford has been avoiding the press and, therefore, is not open to the ruthless public scrutinizing any candidate should undergo. Mr. Carter may be right, but that is one of the few advantages of being an incumbent President and there is only one solution to the problem. The answer is that Mr. Carter must build his own Rose Garden in Plains, Ga., and use it in the same manner that the President uses his. There is no problem erecting a rose garden on the peanut farm behind his house, and Mr. Carter could get his workers to design one that looked exactly like the one Mr. Ford uses for all his public appearances. All he would need besides rosebushes (Jackie Onassis could help him select the varieties) is a table, a chair and a large cup filled with ball point pens. Mr. Carter would declare the rest of his farm off limits to the press and television. He would also refuse private interviews with Playboy, reporters Norman Mailer, Doris Kearns and everyone else. Twice a day he would come out to his Rose Garden and start signing bills. Since Mr. Carter does not have the authority to sign congressional bills, he could sign household bills and bills that have been sent to him for the upkeep of his peanut farm. A certain amount of staging would have to be done to simulate President Ford's visit to his Rose Garden. First the press would be alerte'd that Mr. Carter was going to sign some very important bilfs. The photographers would set up their cameras as would the television technicians. Then the Secret Service would escort the reporters into the Rose Garden where Mrs. Carter, Miss Lillian, Amy and the Carter sons would be waiting. The beneficiaries of the bills would all be placed behind Mr. Carter's chair to applaud when he signed a bill. At exactly the appointed time Mr. Carter would walk out of the back door of his house and seat himself at the table. He would read a short statement. "I am happy to sign this fertilizer bill today, sent to me by the Americus Fertilizer and Feed Company of Georgia. As you know fertilizer is very important in the growing of peanuts and roses and I would hate to think where this country would be without it. This is not the exact bill that I requested, but I believe the advantages it provides outweigh the disadvantages and therefore I am signing it." (Applause from officials of the Americus Fertilizer and Feed Company.) Then Mr. Carter would hand out ball point pens to the executives of the company as well as the accountant who sent him the bill. Occasionally to make the simulation of what goes on at the White House more realistic, Mr. Carter could come out of his house to the Plains Ga., Rose Garden and \ announce he was vetoing a bill. "I just received a bill for my signature from the Georgia Power and Electric Company which I consider highly inflationary and against the best interests of all Americans who use electricity. I am refusing to put my signature on this bill because I feel that if I sign it, it will just encourage the Georgia Power and Electric Company to raise rates which would force me to charge more for my peanuts. I hope the GP and E big spenders who have no sense of fiscal responsibility will have the good sense to sustain my veto." With both men campaigning from their respective gardens, I believe the election would be much fairer, and it would be easier for the American people to decide which man they want to tend the White House roses for the next four years. While President Ford has said on many occasions he never promised the Democrats a rose garden, there is nothing in the election laws that says Jimmy Carter can't build his own. \ 12- IB SO Answer to yesterday's puzzle. ,10 Abbr. on map 11 Egyptian god 16 Dogma 20 Some 23 Culture medium 24 London gallery 25 Formerly (archaic) 26 The Wise Men 27 War god 28 Tears 29 Harden 32 Observed 33 Large 35 In favor of 36 King of the Huns 38 The aftersong 39 Tasty 42 Poison 43 Solar disk 44 Wife of Tyndareus 45 Brief sleep 46 An age 47 Equip 49 Medical org. 21 18 32 51 29 22. 39 41 20 14 23 33 30 42 52 55 44 CRYPTOQUIP 10-5 BMJ DUBDPU FJUNQU SIFJUNLU SI DBDMPNQSBI LQNQSLQSFL Yesterday's Cryptoquip,— CAUTIOUS AUDITOR TRIPPED UP AUDACIOUS TELLER. (© 1976 King Features Syndicate, Inc.) Today's Cryptoquip clue: N equals A The Cryptoquip is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands for another. If you think that X equals 0, it will equal 0 throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words, and words using an apostrophe can give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is accomplished by trial and error. Fall & Winter Storm Door Sale Order Your Door Now! Before winter sets in and you are left out in the cold. See The New Safety Featured PANA-VISION STORM DOORS Windshield Work Is Not A Sideline. CALL US TODAY! BAIER AUTO GLASS CENTER PHONE 2754342 8th & Fulton Garden City WEDNESDAY NIGHT SPECIAL BAR-B-QUE RIBS INCLUDES POTATO SALAD & TOAST SERVING FROM 5 TO 10 P.M. OF NORTH HIGHWAY 83 GARDEN CITY

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