Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on July 16, 1964 · Page 3
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Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 3

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Lake Charles, Louisiana
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Thursday, July 16, 1964
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Page 3
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IN WAKE OF DEFEAT Scranton's Politica Future Is Uncertain ln R| 9 Blast THURS., JULY 16, 1964 Coast Guard Hearing Set HEMENWAY S 3O12 Ryan t? nrv» ploto Call HE 9 9096 let's talk DINETTES 4 styles to choose from YOUR $ NEW ORLEANS (AP) - A the SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-The Bui, hnlh men cloud of delegate votes that ibasc. Bolh were U.S. senators- the osipserf William Warren .Scran-lone, of the host forums in poll-;present 14-13 GOP edge m kn) , n ton's presidential nomination i tics to use for political advance-; congressional seals and re-elect j p it ' inCT Cll Drift iu r»i riM f C" „... TT..,.!, O^ — ii C' -.««.., 4 „.. '** 'm» | *-'' l- t > . The explosion which caused (he worst disaster in the CHOICE . , .. . , . , , . , I Coast Guard hearing will he re- had a po itic-al. campaign lo salvage control of sumcd here next Mondav int(1 1 «.noinre._ m n legislature; maintain 'h°' • hid also cast a long shadow ment. across his political future. \ But under Pennsylvania law Politicans are loathe to enter i Scranlon mav not succeed him-i the Snv Hugh Scott. Scranton's con-! vention floor manager. June 30 explosion which; men south of Morgan low carload hemenway 69 Si MONTHLY the public career of any current office holder with the election record of the slim, affable Pennsylvania governor. But at the same time there are facts that weigh heavily in an assessment of Scranton's prospects in the years ahead— particularly 1%8, another presidential year. self, though he could again run for office after an intervening term. Elected in 1962 by a margin of 486,000 votes, he now is in the middle of his four-year term. The one possible office Scran- lon might consider—and the prospects hinge on results this fall—would be his old congressional seat in Pennsylvania's 10th District. The seat presently is held by That, pieans the base of his j Republican John McDade. But political power—chief executive j the district, normally is Demo- of a major slate—will be cut. off jcralic. With Goldwater as the a I. the end nf I96fi. With one pos- : candidate Republicans fear they No. 1 fact: Scranlon is a gov- s-ible exception there wo\ild be Will lose it. crnor who can not succeed him- no office open that year that he i But old pros in the political i tremcly rare of offshore drilling apparently was touched off when the drill struck a gas pocket 684 feet below the bottom of the Gulf of; Mexico. i Robert. P. Blanlon of New Or- i leans, geologist for the Pan- i American Petroleum Co., told the three-man Coast Guard panel Wednesday thni a delect inn of gas at shallow depths is o\- DURING OUR prices self. Thus, his position is different from that of two other notable politicians who turned convention defeat into victory four years later—the late President new i John F. Kennedy and Hie Republican presidential npp. Ari/.ona Sen. Barry water. Kennedy, defeated at the l!)f>fi Democratic convention in a birl for the vice-presidential nomination, came back like a whirlwind during the next four years could seek as a springboard for j world 1%8, should Goldwater fail to (loses gcnerally figure a man authority when he steps win this fall. There is no senato- Idown in office, rial election in Iflfi6. i Scranton, however, has said When asked if seismic tests could have indicated the presence of the gas, he said. "Scis- operations are set for 3.000 Consequently, should Scranlon I he wouldn't consider the House) fret, or as deep a- the earth can have presidential aspirations in:of Representatives a step down.' 1 1968, there would be a two-year riomi-jgap in his public career. Gold-' The still young Scranlon— he'll be 47 Saturday----is Ihe multimillionaire scion of the family Ilial cave the city of Srr.'inlmi. Pa., its name. With his private resources, plus his prestige as a former Resides, he he had it. liked the job when be penetrated, rather I h ;i n depths of approximately 700 feet where this R;IS w;«s struck." to win the top spot and the election. Goldwaler was placed in nomination at the 1960 GOP convention, but withdrew in favor of front-runner Richard M. Nixon. No. 2 fact: Almost all The move set Goldwater up as a Pennsylvania Republicans,! major contender four years la-i starting with Scranton himself, tcr in the wake of Nixon's de-'fed that Goldwalcr's nomination means a desperate governor and presidential aspi-.; rant, Scranton probably could! keep himself in the public eye ! on the lecture circuit and by writing articles. feat bv Kenncdv. .slate i Goldwater Victory Forecast by AP SAN KRANCISCO (APi •- A sleady stream of reports on whe'rp convention delegates stood, distributed by The Associated Press beginning last March, foreshadowed Sen. Barry Goldwatcr's nomination. 'The Associated Press came within 2iJ votes of forecasting the Arizonan's first-ballot total. The reports enabled Associated Press members to publish and broadcast a continuing count of delegate totals long before the convention opened. AP staffers in every state helped compile the totals. Delegate positions were assigned on the basis of instructions from state and district parly conventions on whom to support, commitments by primary election laws, personal pledges and statements f r o m delegates favorable to a candidate but not officially bound. One week before the conven- Goldwaler f!f>8. Scranlon 217. Rockefeller 110. others 112 and j uncommitted 11. '; Thus Goldwater got 2"> more than the AP survey credited him with. The Scranton figures j were close -- three delegates being all that separated them. Associated ]' r e .s s members . also had the first news of a 1 highly confidential meeting of Republicans a year and a half ago lhat .signaled ih<> big push for Goldwater's nomination. This meeting was held Dec. 2, 1fl(>2. in Chicago, at a motor hotel, with no public notice. The j Associated Press learned of it. i however, interviewed v a r i oils j persons who attended, and re-i ported Dec. ,'i in a story from : Washington: i "Their objective: to get. as one put it. 'an honest-to-G o d conservative Republican candidate for president'—and. i n c i- i Which came first: the golf ball or Gordon s Gin? Golf dates bnck to the 15th Century when a ball stuffed with feathers was used. In 1848 the "guttie" —a hard, moulded ball that was the direct forerunner of our modern golf ball —was introduced in Britain. In London, 7!) years bc/orr this innovation, Alexander Cordon perfected his formula for a special gin. Today, golfers the world over relax at the Nineteenth Hole and enjoy the delicate flavour and distinctive dryncss of Gordon's Gin. Some claim that Gordon's offers considerable consolation as they total their score. No wonder it's the biggest seller in England, America, the world! summer sayings! "^^""^""•^^•"••^•^^"' — ™• -lll ^^"^| . f .>.xsam~~\ i''"~~^ZZ?'*-•'• . ^^^ YFKSATIU'. HAIIY CHAIR IPS v.m co'iv<*r! nnfi o( vmir dnifUr rl'fi: • info n hloh rhrw. smart hrmuMtnn" h n' -lft uphohlot ed In rrn/ to cl^nn vinyl $1,99 7-l'C. Kl.OUN'CK SKIKTCI) COLONIAL CII.Yim with j4fi"x-IK" tahlo tfnr Stylo that extends la 4fi"\-l8"xfiO" (fur family (inline.) Tuliuljar broti/e.lonn Ires, sturrty No. 1 construction ami Honey maple crnim-il (tumble plnsli<| lop. fi eh air* havn cxlr* thick paildnl scats anil hacks covered In culnrriil uipY-clcaii plastic, HKON/KTONK 11INETTK CHAIRS Sturdy tubular bronslono Irame, and extra comfortciblr Iv pcdded sent* mid backs covered in wipe-clean plastic upholstery. lo>nt when von nfpct exlrn seotina space, nnrt a terrific vnlue al this low price. $3.99 DISTILLED LONDON DRY GIN *i>tKti(tlto#*y®p *'*&$&*• PRODUCT OF U. S. A. DISTIIUO IONDON DRVGIN.100% HFUTRHL SPIBIIS OISIIIUO FROM GRAIN. 90 PROOF. GORDON'S DRY GIN CO . UO., LlhDFN, N. J. , ,, • ,u, t . .,-,,-0 dentally, to Irv to block the road hon opened, tins was uV SCC-HP. fo| . ( . fn , ^-^ ^ Ro( . kef(>||c , r 655 of in the AP tabulation, with votes needed to nominate: Goldwater 711, Henry Cabot Lodge 45, Richard M. Nixon :i. Nelson A. Rockefeller 102, William \V. Scranton 151. others Yin and uncommitted 17(i. Wednesday night, before large blocs of votes swung into the senator's column after the first ballot, the vole, stood this way: Goldwaler 883, Lodge ;!, Rockefeller 111 Scranton 214, Sen. Margaret Chase Smith 21. Sen. Hiram Fong 5, Walter .ludd 21. and Gov. George W. Romney 41. And on Ihe. final AP survey of the 1.308 delegates, transmitted shortly before the convention roll call the count read: Ballastics Lab Is Shaken By Two Explosions ROCKKT CENTER. W. Va. (AP) -Two explosions shook the Allcgany Ballistics Laboratory oarly loda\. There were no injuries. The manager. Larry Johns ton. sail' ihc explosions took place "in the pilot plant. \vlnle carrying onl experimental work." The laboratory, a 1.600 acre complex just across the Potomac River from Maryland in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle, is involved primarily in solid propellant research and production 11 is operated tor the Navy by Hercules Powder Co. of Wilmington, Del. "The cause of t.he explosion.-, and the extent of the damage have not yet been determined." Johnson said. Three men were killed and H! others injured in an explosion at the laboratory April 21. 1963 Two explosions shook tht 1 plain Dec. 13, 19ti3. but only one man was injured. Nine persons wen kilied in an explosion wim h de stmyed three building at ihf plant in May 1%1. Dlll.t'Xl: HUON/MTONK IHNKTTK CHAIR Extra thick paddod teals and backs fm maximum comlorl. Lovely washable beige vinyl covers lor coro-lre« use. sturdy lonered hronzetone Inqs. Period when you have extra dinner or party quests. $5,99 Style No. :> Style No. :t Style No. I York." 7-l'C. CONI'll.MI'OUAKV KOliNI) DIMt'lTM .t(i"x!l(i" table extends to family si/e -l(>"t(i(l" with tlie l\vi> r\tr» leaves. Uraulil'nl wood Kiain table l"|> lias practical no-mar finish to resist stains, and heat, li tjhairs have Inxni-ionsly Undilcil seats and hacks for comfort, aiijd wipe-clean bclee, patterned plastic upholstery for care-fice 'use. INOt SHOWN) Attractive Chrome set includes :i(i"\-IHf' table that e.sjlends ID \i't£ (ill" si/e uilh extra leaf. Patterned, slain and beat resistant table lop, and t|italil,v ciMislnicliiin. (> ni.itcliiiiK chairs have thickly padded scats ami hacks, covered in easy-cam plaslin and color coordinated to niiitch the talili 1 . (Nor SHOWN; "-)'('. S.MAJt'l' MODKliA DINKI'TK C.ttit'xIH") Table exteiuU to 'UK l>0" fur family si/e dininc. llcaiitiful walnut wood Riaincd plastic top for carrlree use, and stnrjly tubular steel frame. fi rninliii l.ililv piitldeil seat and bark chairs with smarllv priolcd |>laslic upholstery. SHOP THURSDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. - NO MONEY DOWN UP TO 36 MONTHS TO PAY fisMffll mmer Spectacular! Family-Size, Two-Doer Frostproof..big 13.8 cu. ft. Refrigerator-Freezer • It's completely KKOSTI'KOOK! Kven die free-Apr never needs defrosting! The exclusive frost proof syvlem saves you tune and energy . . . no more messy clean-ups. • Twin glide-out dclndratciis hold nearly •'t biishel of fruits aod vegetables... keeps 'em Iresher longer, always ready for snacks and meals. • Spai inus in-the-door .storage .space wild compartments f ( n cg^s jmi Imitcr. plus lots of room for large hollies and ' •; gallon milk c nnlaiiiers, in keep them al your fingertips'. • Convenient :i-door style means there's no cold lohs in tin- free/.er wh open the refrigerator door . . . keeps food better. Ullll II! MM. Only $15 Month FRIGIDA1RE DELUXE UPRIGHT FOOD FREEZER I '. Cu. It. sr: Month ill-unllh. foil depth sin Ives hold J lol.il FRIGIDAIRE ELECTRIC RANGE WITH j'ULL. 'N CLEAN OVEN SI '. \\H\\\\\ ullli tr,n|le $235 -tut .me sp,ice ill Hie door. Safclv in.iu- \i' f . pounds ol IMI/CII tood, with fmxci lie door >i-iil no all I sides keeps warm iiiit. limit /.ero /.one sale' lluraMr tjjUed c i^iiiel i »l( ri(;r and rilsl resistant interior hin-i u| vtliilr porcelain enamel, .inotliei t'i ixiddire Summer Spectacular at Hemen w ,i\s lou pi i(c. I:.H,II<\ (li\i'li|ii ln|i «ues >ou lots of con\i-iii--.il \ni'k sp.ice win-re you need it. l\- illIM\l I'll 1 ] \ I ll .10 0\ f II plllls 0111 Ilko i diduri mil i le.ios hum ihe top. elimio- itHipinKi. KnesM-d lop keeps spill* niippn^. makes cleaning an e.i-.v ".iipe-np" jo i. ' ^lorajte drapers for pots .mil P.IIIV \ v ).uinuier Spectacular at Special -> jt\ i n K s! i'- parr-h >rai and pi'ini 'p. nty. FRIGIDAIRE AUTOMATIC 2-SPEED, 2 CYCLE FAMILY SIZE WASHER S13 month $208 Ullh trade IJurable porceUin enamel lop for loiiK-liisliuK Kood looks. Two speeds and two cycles for all fabric udshuij;. Kresb, run- niu£ woii-r rinses, automatic lint icrnoial, and convenient, lime s<i\inx spm-dt> fealuie. < ompleie ( Icdninx action cleans clothes tboiouKhU . . inside »nd ool \ Minimci >peclacular lldH ai (his |iu\ pll((. V\( II ^ hi FRIGIDAIRE ONE DIAL AUTOMATIC CLOTHES DRYER S6 month $139 (lollies tenllv tumble dr> in this fine |-ri«idaiie dryer <<•« liiniiK one-dial drmiK I urn-nts of Mann air dry them thorough l\ and ever so Rentl). Ihe all |i,:ll elilill tub IS I!Id35V MUOOtll. -i. even sour fuie.'.t lingerie U »jlc. No more fu.ssina with lines ami clothes pins . . . drv clolhc.t easily, eltorllcssly with an au lumalii I i ii id Jli c disci ullh kiiiiiini r ^pcilaiular >a\io^s now at II v m t- n » a v' s. Ml» V r,| Air Conditioner SPECIALS! lni.ll ( (unli)it I i iu ul.iii r Air Cuuditioners »iMi 1'ij; -»-iKilint; i.i|M(ity cool arouud you, mi' .it -.on Ml |iiiils listed luve 3-sperd. I,in iii-h di. i njiitrul. iind thermuktat for <i ic-i. i-ifii i'-ui ,,|nrration. Jost dial tin* coin- IHii vnu u.iiii tt\ii-M work, play, or sleep in pi-hit iiioliKss uf Krieidaire Air Condt- ihiniiu < ii'ios.- oiue of these Jsuimn«r Spec* • n il.n liu>.s ti.idL\! Reg ^'69.95 12,^00 BTU ( 220 volt $249.95 Reg :2j9? 3 16.000 8TU, 7' 2 omps, !! ; ; .-its , S188 Ko-g -vil99 ! > li|,fX>0 BTU, 220 volt $288 RC.J >>697 ; j 19|,000 BID 220 voltj $369.

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