Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on July 7, 1964 · Page 11
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 11

Publication:
Location:
Lake Charles, Louisiana
Issue Date:
Tuesday, July 7, 1964
Page:
Page 11
Start Free Trial
Cancel

14 15 16 17 1!) 20 21 22 24 25 27 29 30 35 38 33 40 42 43 46 49 fll 52 5.1 57 60 fil 62 83 65 ACROSS Blackout Bullfighter's mantle Token of distinction Axillary Excessively Baffle Western landmark: 2 words Assumed Night before By Ember Windup Dead body Dutch island near Sumatra Shoshonean Vital Approach Lavish spectacles Cheer word Became audible Speck Indexible Soaks Failed to fulfill agreement Sprite facts Story line One who faces Offer Large-eyed bird Limb Born Take Phlegmatic «8 Belief 63 Contrary voles 70 Solar disk 71 Dispatch 72 Blood 73 Repudiate DOWN 1 Gambol 2 Source of oil 3 Fuss over: 3 words 4 Part of "to be" 5 Shade o£ blue 6 Unwilling 7 Legume 8 The Wonder Stale 9 Flammable gas 10 Highest note H Nobleman 12 Arabian seaport 13 Impart to 18 Fifth columnist* 23 Prolonged attacks 26 Consumed 28 Bailroad terminal: abbr. 31 Fine china 32 Vague 33 Surmounting 34 Naval vessels: abbr. 35 Dry 36 Custody 37 Sickly looking 4T Disconcerting 4-1 Siesta 45 Divided skirt 47 Athletic groups 48 Building wing 50 British dry goods dealer 54 Wipe out 55 Number 56 Little 57 Room and •— 58 Thought 50 Dresses in 64 House animal 66 Low 67 Lugubrious Puzzle of Monday, Julj- f>, Solved Mrs. John F. Kennedy To Sell Home in D.C. WASHINGTON (AP) - Mrs. John F. Kennedy is leaving the capital — and its memories of great triumph and deep sadness—to live in New York, hoping the change will be beneficial to her and the children. The widow of the assassinated president disclosed she plans to sell her two homes in the area and fake up residence in New York in time to enter Caroline, G, and John Jr., 3, in school this fail. "While she will always maintain her close ties in Washington," said the statement issued through her office Monday, "Mrs. Kennedy feels that the change of environment in New York, from Georgetown and its many memories, will be beneficial to her and the children." The memories are at every corner. It was in Georgetown where she and Kennedy lived after they were first married, while he was a senator—from where he drove to his inaugura- j tion—and to where she returned Uo live after his death in Dal- jlas last Nov. 22. | She bought the 14-room i Georgetown house, at 3017 N {Street, last December for a reported $175,000, and it has be- jcome a regular stop among the i capital's tourist attractions. i The other home is Wexford, (he 26-acre estate in the Virginia hunt country which she and the president built for a | weekend retreat and complet- ; ed only last summer at an es- ;timalcd cost of $100,000. They ihacl little time to use it. In New York, Mrs. Kennedy phms to live in the Carlyle Ho- jtcl — her husband's favorite I stopping off place in the city- i until she finds an apartment. ADULTS 75c CHILDREN... 15c T» V OADTOp ATERNIT BobHope -The Global Girls * ' THE SHOWS iOU WISHED YOU HAD SEEN! ADULTS ONLY * NO ONE UNDER 16 ADMITTED NEW MOON Child With arents 15c s IHI.S -'.\u ADLi/r HIT: RAVAGED' c-ii Picture of TOM JONES' (Al 5:15) Siaris Thursday * Bc-ii Picture of the Year TO TOXVN". COLOK "BEATLtS COME AMUSEMENT AND ARTS 'People of f he Little World' Hove Rough Rood to Follow Trac ¥ Alert un Movie Set TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1964, Lake Charles Americon Press 11 HOLLYWOOD (AP)-His legs dangled over the edge of the bus-stop bench. His face, shaded by a blue fedora, resembled a dried quince. A natty suit covered his beach - ball figure. His voice sounded as if it came from an old gramophone. Billy Rhodes is by his own definition a Lilliputian. "I realize the word is a hard one for most people to say, so they call us midgets," he remarked. "Well, that's all right. They can call us midgets if they like. We people of the little world have a tough road to follow." Little Billy, as his billing reads — the ring on his tiny finger spells L. B. in diamonds — was resting on the bench at Las Palmas Avenue during one of his daily promenades down the Boulevard. Sitting in the midday sun like a miniature Buddha in a blue suit, he re- GOREN ON BRIDGE I5Y CHARLES H. GORENT to 1944: Bf Tilt Chlcow TrltONl East-West vulnerable. East deals. NORTH A Q43 EAST A J 8 G 2 S? Q J 0 J 7 3 +KQ74 0 AS *J105 WEST A 10 <v> A 10 9 7 6 OQ1042 + 986 SOUTH A A K 9 7 5 S?2 0 K986 + A32 The bidding: East South West North Pass 1 A Pass 2 9 Pass 2 * Pass 3 * Pass 4 A Pass Pass Pass Opening lead: Nine o£ 4» Today's hand resulted an a significant swing when it arose in a recent tcam-of-four match, The four spade contract was reached by North and South at both tables— however, one do? clarer succeeded in scoring an overtrick while the other one was actually defeated in 'his bid.- At both, tables, West led the nine of clubs; however the technique employed by each declarer differed from the outset. One South put up the ten of clubs from dummy and, when this was covered by East's queen, he played the ace from his hand. A heart was led at trick two and West rose with the afle to return another dub. East won two tricks in the suit to complete the defensive book, and he now led a fourth round of clubs. South discarded a diamond and West ruffed in with the ten of spades forcing North to overmff with the queen. Try as he might, declarer was unable to avoid losing a trump trick to East subsequently, and he suffered a setback on the deal. At the other table, when. East covered the ten of clubs with the queen on the opening lead, declarer'permitted him to hold the trick. East could not continue the suit profitably, so he shifted to the queen of hearts. West played the ace and returned a heart taken by North's king, on which South discarded his remaining small club. A club was led to the ace, and dummy was re-entered with the ace of diamonds so that declarer could ruff a club with the five of spades. The king of diamonds was played and a small diamond trumped with dummy's three of spades. South ruffed the heart return as East discarded a club. The king of trumps was cashed felling West's lone ten and South trumped his last diamond with the queen of spades as East helplessly underruffed. On the heart return from dum. my, South sat behind East's jack-eight of trumps with the ace-nine. Declarer took the last two tricks to chalk up an overtrick. OPEN 7 P.M. PHONE 436-2503 —ADMISSION- ADULTS 1.50 CHILDREN, ANYTIME ... .50 NOW SHOWING THE NO. I 1 ATTRACTION OF ALL TIME AT SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES! Scheduled Performance at 8 P.M. Box Office Opens at 7 P.M. COLOR BY DE LUXE *•*•*! Wed. Only — 2 Shows 2 P.M. - 8 P.M. Roxoffice Open at 1:00 P.M. - 8 P.M. Matinee: Adults S1.25 — Evening $1.50 LAST 2 DAYS FEATURES START 5:00—7:10—9:25 MOT .M^ _-^^^^ m • • BROwn that aint-down yet gal... in the must-see movie! STARTS THURSDAY July 9 SSp y ii hat you wil1 ex P erience «»a lifetime all that oiii see HI... J( , uf , H £ UVifiE plt . £M , IGUKIUU! THIS IS ADULT tMERTAINMCNT! Doors Open 4:45 P.M. HOLLYWOOD (AP) - "First team" shouted flie assistant director, signaling the stand-ins to fleeted on his 69 years in the I step out of the scene and the little world. i slars to take lheir placcs Oskar Werner entered him "I grew up in awful poverty simply awful. Mattress on the floor, that sort of il> to J ers—I was so small I could only hold three at a time. One day I wandered up an alley which happened to be a stage entrance. Out came a guy in a beaver - collared overcoat with ivory - tipped cane and English bowler. "He not only bought all three of my papers, he gave mo a ticket to the show." Little Billy joined (he repertory company and was later! adopted by the manager, Jerry Grady. Billy played all the child roles. Billy moved on lo vaudeville and Broadway, appearing with Marilyn Miller in "Peter Pan" and in George M. Cohan's "Review of 1916." In 1928 he was brought to Hollywood for his first movie, "Side Show," with Marie Prevost. He has been around the Boulevard off and on ever since and still works in movies and television. He lives alone and hangs out with the normal-size actors at the Masquers' Club rather than with the colony of little people. "I don't like midgets; they're too damned smug," he muttered. "I've lived with big people all my life, and 1 prefer them." i Author of Short Stories Has New Play Tried Out NEW YORK (AP) - "One in a Row," a play about an author who finds overnight suc- cuss a headache, is being readied on the summer Iryout cir- Broadway. Ben Piazza has the focal role in the drama. The author, Flip Schaffer, a member of the history faculty at the University of Michigan, has written short stories before. This is his first stage effort. The cast and crew laughed al Tracy's gag; he was responding like an old fire horse to the clanging of the bell. Although the actor is frequently on the set of "Ship of Fools," he is not working in the movie. There had been reports thai Tracy is observing Stanley Kramer's making of "Ship of Fools" with the idea of turning director himself. I asked him about that. "I don't know," he replied. "It might be an interesting experience, but I'm not sure 1 have the patience to direct. 1 will say that I am learning a great deal by watching. You'd think I'd know all the tricks by now. But you miss a lot when you have to concentrate on your own job. "Another reason I'm hanging around I won't go into, but it happens that this company is still paying me. a lot of money. (Apparently for previous Kramer films.) "But if you want to know the real reason, it's because I gel a free lunch every day." Me made the remark with a twinkle and it reflected his present mood, which is mellow. Tracy has been known to get his Irish up. Ho is all smiles on the "Ship of Fools" set. He looks great, belying all the fears for his health when hc was stricken with a lung congestion last July and later had to withdraw from a role in "Cheyenne Autumn." His face is ruddy and his figure trim. Amateur Groups Now Have Musical Works Available NEW YORK (AP) - A library of musical works is now being made available to ama- , Damatists Play Service. The 25-year-old agency lias concentrated on dramatic works. A spokesman said the move was being made because of growing interest in musicals among c o in in u n i ty thespic groups. STUI' SKA I' r NOW! FRESHLY CAUGHT SEAFOODS BROILED STUFFED LOBSTKK 'FED FLOUNDER * SHRIMP BKI.MONT 'OOD PLATTER * TROUT ALMONDIN'K STUFFED SHRIMP RIME STEAKS * FRENCH CUISINE COCKTAILS - MIXED DRINKS ^elntont OPEN 6 A.M. TIL 11 P.M. DAILY AT BELMONT TOURIST MOIT.I,, 2730 BROAD Phone HE U-:!4H1 ROUND-UP East Broad Street HE 6-6120 TONIGHT ADULTS 75c * MUST Fi..m KK KIRS1 UIUVE-1N SHOWING A.VJ> TUESDAY CHILDREN 15c 7:15 I'.M. THE UST SUNSET •' <*z*£:^. •£» . - ., DOROTHY MAIONE • JOSBH wnw CAROL m *;-,'..,>:•.».;.-.,• .*.•»,•, .. ,, 4 ..... ,., WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY RICKYNEISON INK &«0« -WEI mm WARD BOND MARTIN TEC.-iNiC&LCf<Vr;a J_-'J VA "'"* B^C» \j^ ROBERT TAYLOR in "THE HANGMAN" -Junior Editors Quiz on- FIGURES WORD [ FIVE SYSTEM QUKSTMJY: Where did numbers came from: 1 a * a A.VSW'F.K: tt is prohalijc (fiat numliors c.uiic (rom (he tally syv Inn winch is thought to have, hern used by prehistoric men to ktrp li.ick. of tlirlr IK>SSCSS|OIIS. If such a man had 5 sheep, he might have, picked out 5 stonc.i to rqiirsrnt llu>\; If a lamb was born, h« would have added another stone. A big Kep was lo use a word in- Mrail ol the group ol striiirs. Gradually, a group of "counting wrnU* was formed. As clvlll/atlon developed with lls need for written records, men searched for marks or symbols (o sum! for the counting words. •Siii-li .symbols brcajnc known as 'numeral*/ awl we show how ibry appeared In dlllcrcnt clvlll/.atlons In regard to die number 10: Notlca that today we. use the same two symbols for 10 which the Arablaui used. The oilier utiic symbols also nre die same. Exactly how tin ' Aralis arrived at their counting sysltra we do not know, but It ha* licen one of the most Important Inventions In history. Tht nine symbols and the Important one for zero probably originated In India, licl'orc Arabian adoption. The great value of this system was In tht placement of digits so tlioje. to the left would have a higher value, such as by ten limes, or a hundred times, « » • VOK YOU TO DO: Take a forge sheet of paper and a pencil. 1'rctaid you're living lit the world before the Arabic number system. Invent a symbol for 1. Suppose you had to express 900 by writing your symbol 900 times. It would be quite a chore, wouldn't It? Instead, just write down the Arabic symbols for 900, Se.c how much t.isfer that l«? » M » f.j (Shmol Knv l.ulUr of Tyler, Tex., wins today's combined prl/.s nf C.ompton's IHustiakd Science Dictionary plus JlO dollars cash, fur tills question. Mall yours on a postcard to Junior Editors in c.at« of tills newspaper, and you may win the weekly p»l?.a of Complon 1 * Fictured Encyclopedia.) U.S. Opera Soprano To Visit Russia NEW YORK (AP)-Lcontync Price, Metropolitan Opera soprano, has accepted an invitation to accompany the Italian La Scala Opera company to the Soviet Union in September, it was announced today. Recent recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, Miss Price, a Negro, is scheduled to nppear in two performances of the Verdi Requiem in Moscow under the baton of Herbert von Karajan. Later she plans lo attend the Berlin festival and then go lo London in November for appearance i'i a new production of II Trovatoic. PALACE Phono 439-2406 Now thru Wed. OPEN 7 P.M. THE NO. 1 ATTRACTION OF ALL i ,,:t AT SPECIAL POPULAR PRICES! ADMISSION: ADULTS $1.25 CllILUKEN UNOEK 13 IRS. SOo COLOR BY DC UUXC Scheduled Performances at 8 P.M. Boxoffice Opens at 7 P.M. MSanKKtKI bwjTtoWIWfcr »««•*< tlMl Starts THURSDAY -___^. !?nn wfcM 181 you wi " ex P erience in a ''Mime all that yuu win iee in... JOS j PH £ UWN£ ( icm THIS IS ADULT ENTERTAINMENT! PARAMOUNT HE 9-3021 Ol'EN TODAY' 1:13 P.M. Alii MS S1:UD CHILDREN lijc STUDENTS 75o NOW SHOWING JEffRV LEWIS MTSY 5:00 ti:50 S:45

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free