Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on July 4, 1964 · Page 13
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Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 13

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Lake Charles, Louisiana
Issue Date:
Saturday, July 4, 1964
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Page 13
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[ CROSSWORD PUZZLE ] 8ft Spltft 60 Parade tlma fit Dozen 62 Inhibit* DOWN 1 Mighty 2 Wealthy 3 Color* 4 Label* 5 Summer in Soissoris 6 Intervals 7 Teamster 8 Girl's nam« 9 Repeat over *nd over JO Tax assessment 11 Recurring annually 12 Crawly creatur* 15 Aspect 17 Dispatchei 20 Nitric — 23 Lowers In rank 24 Summaries 27 TV movie 28 Equine 31 Poetic contraction S3 Possessive pronoun 35 Caught in th« «ct 36 Lose* freshness 37 Idolizers 38 Football pass 39 Heroic tal« 40 Household appliance 41 Journalists 42 Fortification 4f> Yawners 48 European river 50 Annual Income: French 52 Small fish Examine 56 Highest 58 Girl'* name fotALMOSTA CENTURY, THE CHIEF INDUSTRY IN OAKVILLE HAS BEEN THE OAKVU.LE METAL COMPANY. DANIEL HARDENNHAS RECENTLY GAINED CONTROL OF THE F!KM. r I'LL ABSORB THE ASSETS.' WETC SHUTTING POWM THIS PLANT/ FATHER BACK 1 AWAV ON THAT WE HAVEOYHKAMILLION TOllAfc* INVENTORY-NOT ENOUGH PKOPUCT10NTO. HANDLE NEW ACCOUNTS.' coes <<WR KINO ) ? J ^' THANK V00...0JHAT DOES IT MEAN* B0N6 FREE FROM ' INDEPENDENT' /MEAM? V7HINK OF THAT? ---- _ Puzzle o( Friday, Jnlr 3, Solved /YA6SUH. HE'S-S'GH/ SHMOOJTAtfSHMOaS/S SO MAKES HIGH- GRADESUSPEMDER ANOTHER DEMAND FROM LIL' ABNER WHAT IP PPTEET t?_lp ^^ WHAT IF HE...? FINP OUR PANSEEOUS HOLD IT, STEVE... A6ENT WITHIN THE FAJJZ AKEA M£ANWWL.B f GO UPSTAIRS AND TEU- POOPLV BIXENSHOOS PON'T REALLY -WHEN. I'M REALLY SCAB OUT 70 THE F/ AN? WE'LL. TALK I'LL. Bilsr GEN. PHIL-ERIE THE 'HEAP, WHlLff POTCET CLOBBERS POOPLV.' .Jti MRS 60IHS TO TELL. MB SOME THINS STEVE CANYON ACROSS 1 Worker in ceramics 1 Skeleton organizations i IS Pain reliever I H Fly I 15 Submerge* 16 Wild talker* 18 Stops 19 Lad from Limerick SI Quebec peninsula 22 God of war 23 Gambler 25 Legal claim 26 Wrongdoing 27 Withdraws 29 Conjunction SO Highly regarded 32 Limits 34 Greek god 35 Concert number 36 Hardwood 3!) School term 43 Crete's mountain 44 Nullified 46 Poetic form 47 Building sites 49 Men of wisdom 50 Attack Bl Trapped aloft 53 Moccasin 54 Seed covering 85 Arranged in succession B7 Eastern itat» capital SATURDAY P JULY 4, 1964, Lake Charles American Press SAYS SCRANTON Barry Could Cause Violence /N LONDON Campaign Starts As Home Tours LONDON (AP) — Stoking up i would have permitted Spain to for the coming national election, j build frigates of British de- Prime Minister Sir Alec i sign, a contract which, along Douglas-Home toured London j with the supply of parts, would suburbs Friday flaying his La-j have been worth some $50 mil- bor party opponents. He called i lion to Britain. Labor an old-fashioned party] H e told the crowds as he harking back to the battle of; w hj. s kcd around southeast Lon- Waterloo. c ion: Focal point of his attacks was i ..^ j jmnortanl to the decision by Spain to break i n markets There off a warship deal - claiming i market 'comine Spanish pride was injured b s • • industrial through criticism uttered by La-' - - l borite leader Harold Wilson. r(in i, i-i n ^ in s > Standing on the back of a truck at Peckham Rye, Douglas-Home told the crowd: "One of the worst features hera is really that the Labor party are incapable of moving their minds away from the past. They are "fighting the Spanish civil war still; they are fighting the South African war still; (hey will soon be back to Waterloo." The projected Spanish izmg." ' The order, he went on, would have been a help to British industry. At another stop, Douglas- Home said it had been the first time in 20 years that Spain had wanted to buy British. "And what do the Socialists I COULDN'T 00 A THIN& RIGHT - NATTEREO TOO MUCH, KNOCKEt> THE TABLE OVER,.... PLAYED THE WRONG- CAR&S, MlS-bEALT-] AN 1 WON MORE THAN 'E DIP / he demanded. "They come along and wreck the order and the other orders. I am going to ask the people of this countrv not to stand for it." Congressmen May Test Rights Law JACKSON, Miss. (AP)— Three congressmen arrived in Mississippi Friday to get a first-hand look at the volunteer students civil rights activities and immediately sparked reports they ers have been the object of federal, state and local search since their burned out car was found near Philadelphia, Miss. The congressmen huddled with Council of Federated Or- would test the public accommo-1 gani/ation leaders at the Jack- dations of the new civil rights; <*,„ airport and then moved to Jaw. Reps. William F. Ryan of New York, and Augustus Hawk- | Greenwood. ' They were to look at the new , „,.,. ,, . , ,, ,., ! national headquarters of the ins and Philip Burton ot Cahf., ! S(U(k , nl Non . v ? 0 |ent Coordinat . j ing Committee. Prior to their arrival, Gov. workers. doodman and two other work- Go/dwoter Is Accused Of Racism NKVY YoKK iAPi--K.iy Wil kins, executive diivctnr nf Ihc National Association ioi - the Advancement of Colored People, said Friday that fears expressed by Sen. Barry Goldwa- ; dents. "f hope that, all Mississippians ail Democrats, said, however, they were in the state to talk with constituent students. , ,,,•... Rep. Rvan represents the dis-: Paul J .» nnson appealed for Mis trict Which includes the home i sissippians to avoid any mci of Andrew Goodman, one of three missing civil rights, will be alert to see to it that these congressmen do not create an incident, which will inure lu their benefit and to their reelection,'' Johnson said. "The.se congressmen have nian\ problems requiring solutions in their home states,'' the governor said. 'They could best Mi'-nd their time solving their nun problems rather than by en atni'-i problems for others in ulher .-Uiies The -peculation 1 h a I they \\uiild tr. i the -I'urei'ated hote sy.-.tem here arose when it was learned one of the congressmen. Hawkins, was a Negro. A COFO spokesman said the ter that the civil rights issue lawmakers had no planned itin- FARGO. N.D. (AP)—PennsyU vania Oov. William W. Scranton said Friday nomination of U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater as the Republican candidate for president could lead to racial violence because of Goldwatcr's stand on civil rights. In one of his most cutting attacks yet against the front-running Arizona senator, Scranton contended Goldwater as a ca- didate would inject "emotion" into the summer and fall campaign. Scranton, who seeks to overtake Goldwater and win Ihc nomination, spoke at a news conference here as he toured the Dakotas in quest of delegate support.. Each of the Dakotas will have 14 delegate votes at the GOP National Convention. i In this farming region Scranton attacked statements of Goldwater on farm issues, as well as President Johnson's han- could explode in the presidential campaign, as publicized. amounts to a call to racism Wilkins spuke at a news conference. "A man who is a candidate for the highest office in the United States uught to be cartiuJ about talking about the injection '>f racism in the campaign." Wilkins said. The fact that the tupu \*aa brought up represents 'a -'.>.'.<! ]| lus rather than a '" rarism, Wilkins erary would remain OUt they inn/ugh Sunday. The U'iu did nut attempt to rr.i-ei with state leaders in Jack- M.I:I. but mi-relv paused pjing to Greenwood. A COFO sp'>kc,-. r )>an said they wanted to get a fif•-4-ha'id report on the cr. :1 rv!. : - a<-iiv:!i<^ in the When r. ed ii J:K k-•••: thi-y .-'a" . arri'.cd .*nc d:.-. :•" ' '»f the civil rii'hu bill: DO you TnlKK Or THIS A MESS" ' TnfSE V ARE >OUR , QUARTERS, / MAJOR. I'M rlAHERrPAT XXiK CGNr'Cf r,CE. I. CrtlNG. BUT 1M AFRAiP I'M 6G*N6 TO NeEI? A COUPLE Or MiRAClES IO f-WL Th',5 ONE OUT.' THERE IS AN 01D ' CKiKESE PROVf R3, MAJOR. .'MIRACLES SHAPEP IN Tn£ PERSON WHO PERFORMS THEW: , dling of agrkultural policy. He proposed a broad farm plan of his own. The governor also disclosed he will make a Saturday and Sunday last-ditch assault by plane, train, television and old- fashioned rallies on the Sft-vote Illinois delegation Jo the GOP convention at San Francisco. Earlier this week the delegation indicated in a poll it would give 48 first-ballot votes to Goldwater. Scranton said his plan is to arouse public opinion to sueh an extent in Illinois that pressure will be put upon the dele- I gation to back the governor's ; cause. I In his civil rights statement i hsre Scranton said the race issue would be accentuated by the fact that President Johnson strongly supported the measure, while Goldwater voted against the legislation. De Gaulle, Erhard Hold Unit Meet ANDY CAPP i~ » WHY DO YOU WAKE ME UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT OUT OF A NICE, SOUND SLEEP? OH, IF" YOU'RE ™ GOING TO 0E SO MAD ABOUT IT, 1 WON'T TELL YOU - SO THERE.' DAG WO OP WAKE UP-WAKE UP IT SHORE MUST ^ BE POWERFUL GOOD < TO BRING HER OUT I IN THIS DR1VIN'RAIN / YONDER COMES EU/INEV WIF SOME GOSSIP, MAW BONN, Germany CAP)—With t visiting President Charles de i Gaulle and Chancellor Ludwig Erhard, a joint French-West German Cabinet session sought Friday some new step to move forward the cause of West European unity. The idea was to give a political basis to the economic ties that bind the European Comm o n Market—France, West Germany, Italy, Belgium, Holland and Luxembourg. Britain is on the outside. De Gaulle, who was under an extremely heavy security guard as what German police call a "specially endangered person," tutd reporters: "I think that from our meetings there will emerge, more and more, a Europe better and better united." Pressing for action was former Chancellor Konrad Adenauer. De Gaulle spent an hour in Adenauer's office. Beside the two chiefs, those present at the meeting of Cabinet ministers included French Premier Georges Pompidou, and the two countries' minis- ters of foreign affairs, defense, economics, agriculture and development aid. Adenauer recently has been urging the two governments to make some clear forward move toward European political union. His statements have been widely taken aa criticism of Erhard, whose succession to the chancellorship he long opposed. Karl Guentner von Hase, spokesman for the Erhard government, fought shy of the idea i in talking with reporters. He was obviously worried about anything that might look like an attempt of France and West Germany to dictate to the other four members of the Common Market. The other four, especially Hoi- i land and Italy, are reluctant to make any move toward greater unity without Britain. De Gaulle arrived Friday morning with seven Cabinet members for two days of talks under the treaty that requires such French - West German ! meetings twice a year. Taxpayer Believes U.S. Should Say Thanks' AUGUSTA C.a <AP>-Wheni normally send out thank-you il comes to advertising, Rob! notes to acknowledge tax re- in that, too. But he also believes the government should at least say thanks. Hunter believes in the latter .so strongly that he wrote Mortimer Caplin, commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, and suggested Hint taxpayers should be given thank-you notes. ; Hunter says tie received no 1 word from Caplin -not even an acknowledgement of the suggestion. So, Hunter took 10 billiards to express his sentiment Kadi billboard carries this message: "Dear Mr. Caplin: Why not send thank-you notes to taxpayers?" The message is signed, ' Warmhearted Suggestion." they could be included in the tax forms the IRS sends taxpayers at the end of each year. '"'This would create a kind of prepaid thank you," he said. Responses To Rights Call Hailed by LBJ JOHNSON CITY, Tex /AP) - ; President Johnson has described as "wonderful and very The campaign is based on the ! American business tradition of saying thank you for moneys*- reived when it is payment of a debt. •'When we reali/.ed the Internal Revenue Service does not Time Limit Halts Evers' Registering JACKSON, Miss, i AH i A e<i ! two-year residence requirement rights act Press si Keedy said Friday that Johnson had received responses from community leaders, businessmen, officials and labor leaders from all parts of the country, including tr* Deep South Kredy .said 'wonderful and very hopeful" wen- Johnson's words of reaction. He also announced that John•>on h<is picked Arthur H. Dean, a prominent New York lawyer, to head a national Citizens' Committee for Community Relations This, ctifiiimttee will work with IjjRoy Collins, former governor of Florida, who has been selected as director Collins and the advisory corn- in vote registration procedures mittce will work with commu- quickly ended the first an- mties and seek to mediate and i nouriced text of the new civil nmciliate problems arising un' rights law Fridas in MISSIS- der the civil rights law 1 sjnpi Dean has accepted the post nf Field secretary Charles Kvers, chairman <>f the advisory group of the National Association for •• Rwh -aid lh« Advancement ol Colored Dean, a senior partner of lh« People led a group of Negroe-j 'aw firm of Sullivan Cromwell, into the Hindi County court- has served in various govern- house to test the voter regutra- m «it capacities In the past. One in n -ection of his jobs was that of chairman Evers became field secretary I" 1 the U.S. delegation to the Ge- after his broiler, \ [*™ 1 ^ amam !f t *»}» ,^ ch ;he held from 1961 until lata De- icember 1962. DAN HAGG one Medgar, was killed by sniper's shot in the back. Evers confronted Deputy Cir- " cujt Clerk A. R. McLeod who f^Q CnOnCG 5660 •• questioned him briefly. _ — J'.' Vfheo Evexa acknowledged he ; |"0r kXlfQQltlOn had not filled the residency re- j fk r kj • f« - \ quireineut he was turned awayjUT INQZI V^nniinQl : and refused permission to take i WIESBADEN. Germany (AP) trie voter registration lest. A police spokesman says West Evers and his group iher, I'.t'rmajiy has no chance oi ex- ieft Uie vole regisuui's offiet iraduing Haas Waiter 2Jech • in Mjiiinsipp:, U.e circuit Ntmitwich. au escaped Naii war eltrk of each of the 82 counties criminal reported in South Alri- al.-io hnlds the dual nifice of vote ca. The two countries have no u>:iMf-ir. eMradnion treaty.

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