Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on November 7, 1952 · Page 4
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 4

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Mt Vernon, Illinois
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Friday, November 7, 1952
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i J. THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1952 MT. VERNON REGISTER-NEWS ITT tfCKKOH NBWS UrrJLBlABUKD IK1 KT TBHNOX aseirrai KSTASLJSHITJ IIM CONSOLIDATED IIW1MM1 M. IMP BOWLK KACKaWAt 0. J ruuMPSon OR1AN UBTCAUT — fi. L SHEH0H.J" Mltm . Baatnaw IMIKI R.w> Kdltm , Plant Boparlnundent IU3CBEB OF HU ASSOCIATED PaBSS— Th. AMOOIIUX ! Prw to «xeJn«l»«lf «a tlUM «e tbr OH for U» oubUeattoa el aU „,», nrodiwo to « a* not otJ».r»ta. «a<liv «] u> thl. cpar and •»» U« »oeal aaw. Bntarrt a. SavowJ CU.» mattat tor oana Sanation thronrb iht -aU. a. the P0.1 act oJ March 8. 1879. • UUICKXiTK)* MATE* Satwcrlpuont matt IM paid Is adTan By malt itff.raon araat) and ad- loin lot eoaatlat < MM raw— .. 0 moa S3 75. > OM »ajt» 1 aia By mall ootatdf laffaraoa and «d» lolnlni coontlw wtthlr ISO aUMat Taai SS.OOt 6 mat Sft 00' S nwa, $3 .26' par alnrli month Oiiuidr ZBO mllM raw 98.00' 8 IBM I67S: t tie* M7S- noa month . . i >llT «irrd by earrtn la Ht» par waafc , 1 10.00 1.00 1.26 1J )0 At A Thought For Today Frot not thyaelf becau.e of evildoer., neither bt1 thou »/J»' n ** the workers of Iniquity. For they »h»» ««>n <» eutdown like the grass, and wither an the^ green herk—•FsaJms lis 1,Z. Evil springe up. and flowers, and besrs no seed. And feeds the green earth with lta swift decay. Leaving It richer for the growth of tmth>—Lowell, # Editorial IKE IS GIVEN NOTICE TO DELIVER; GOP HAS NO REASON TO GLOAT G EN. DWKiHT D. EISENHOWER'S astounding landslide victory is above all n personal triumph for him. Across the nation he ran far ahead of his party in state nftcr Btate. The outcome Is a deep affirmation of the faith the American people have In Ike as a man qualified to lead them lo safety and well-being at home and abroad In those days of great trial. When a victory of such proportions is made, it means a new mood ii upon the people. This was not an election that could have been won or lost, by sliffht changes of strategy, by talking differently to the voters, by endorsing or not endorsing particular candidates in particular states. This result shows the American people have a yearning for a new face, the face of a man they can trust. They clearly want fresh and original thinking upon a whole host of problems that the present administration seems able to meet only with tired, worn, unproductive and sometimes corrupt effort. Beyond doubt Ike's triumph measui'es these things first, The reinforcing fact is that issues like the Korean war, inflation, communism in government, corruption and the like have bitten deep into the consciousness of the average voter. » * * B Y THAT VERV TOKEN, Eisenhower—and his party—are on firm notice from the people to deliver. In this victory he has cut across all lines, sectional, economic, ethnic. He plainly has captured countless normally Democratic votes. The men and women of America who handed him this stiff challenge expect him to take it up with full courage and resolute action. In 1946, the Republicans rode to victory in Congress on a wave of postwar resentments against controls, shortages and such. When the people did not like what the party did to solve those problems, they promptly threw the GOP out and restored the Democrats to power. That could happen again. For nothing In this victory, however •weeping it may be, suggests fcho Americans have yet taken off their predominantly Democratic voting loyalties. They are merely giving somebody else a trial run. If Eisenhower is able to produce answers matching his remarkable contributions to America's security during and. after World War II, then he may be able to consolidate the- hold he now has gained on his own party, and beginning to cut away Democratic strength in a more lasting manner. • a • S HOULD THAT HAPPEN, the country may mark Nov. 4, 1952, as the inaugural date of .a real two-party system In the South. For nothing about Iko's winning was more striking than the heavy Inronds lie made in states that only once before in modern times have tumbled Into the Republican column. There can be no gloating among Republicans. Tf they do not know it. now, they will soon learn that winning the presidency In this critical age is something like winning a war—it is only slightly bolter than losing. For General Eisenhower instantly inherits a frightening catalogue of problems of world-wkje scope. He has groat difficulties ahead In party organization and control. He must continue the process—so well begun—of making himself over from a military man to a states man and politician. In this task all men of good will in America can only wish him the very best of fortune and voice the hope that with God's help he may succeed. Your Manners You are invited to the wedding of a girl and have already given her one or more shower presents. WRONG: Feel that you do not need to give her a wedding gift. RIGHTt Realize that a shower gift does not take the place of a wedding gift. Modern physics has developed mainly as a result of 'extensive study of radiation and rays, according to the Encyclopedia Bri tannlca. Music Lesson Answer to Previous. Puixle HORIZONTAL VERTICAL 1 Finest 2 Singing volet 1 The big drum 8 Wooden wind instrument C Musical syllable 12 Pen name of Charles Lamb 13 Embraces 14 Pronoun 15 Those skilled in public affairs 17 Male sheep 18 Heavy volumes 19 Eyes (slang) 21 Strewn (her.) 22 Comrades 23 Ocean 24 Measure of 3 Thailand 4 Cloys 5 Exclamations 6 Car part 7 Curved molding 8 Hirelings 0 Menaces 10 Back 11 Weapons 16 Used to contract eye pupils 20 British dramatist 1 M \ N » 4 • 0 t • • L. m A E f O St A * • T m m T 1 N • V T * A K v 1 A * k N • • i | A • m L. A I • T V • # A N T L. • at T 1 N • N SI • P •kt « t • A at at * U 1 m T M A J» • • V • v$ A u T i * • N Y a A U A • s * A K * N O K. • * l_ A T B P 1 E • u A P m *v O * T OB3Q 1 N k m •f • B ; 24 Tune .' 27 Unusual 29 Famous English school ' 32 Trust j 84 Remove 136 Lament i 37 Happenings ' 38 Paradise 39 A few 41 Toper 42 "The —. World Symphony" 44 Dress wool 46 Take away 49 Transparent linen 53 Mineral rock 54 Cherishes 86 Knight's title 87 Head (Fr.) 88 Card game 59 Abstract being €0 Soap-maklnf frame 61 Essential being land 25 Angered 36 Those who regret 28 Dropsy 30 German king 31 Bird's home 33 Pullman car 35 Turns outward 40 Double quartets 43 British hymnist 45 Wet 46 Prescribed amount 47 Land of the shamrock 48 Algonqulan Indian 80 Annoys 51 Meadows 52 City of Italy 55 Roman bronze 1 z r- 1 a H 1 r- » »• i<( ii It 17 IS sr b w i fl'"" it ti. I P w XT » % P V I P HI i w * ¥7 * P 30 JT 51 % ft H 7 They'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hatlo H'yA,SLU66ER- HOW'STUEBO/? A-MA-CAM'T TAKE IT, HUMP CiMOM .PUT'EM UP/GETTIM'SOFT; HUH,KID ? THE CHAMP'S BLACK /WD BLUE FROM 7VIEM LITTLE GUYS WHO WAHT ^ TO GO BACK HOME AHO TELL PEOPLE "tUEY TOOK A SOCK AT HM/ AND THEY ALL GIVE tilM THAT "I BET WOO DOM'T REMEMBER ME " ROUTl>JE~ME MAKES BELIEVE HE OOES.OR THEyLL SAY HE'S GOT A BI6 HEAD— AND EVERY 611/ WHO Buys A SANDWICH IN" HE(?E PUTS THE Brre ON SUJ 6 GER TO APPEAR AT SOME LODGE RACKET FOR FREE- CHAMP DIDN'T KNOW HOW EASY • THE FIGHT GAME WAS TILL HE SOCKED THIS SREET-AMD-EAT . DOD3E- o .si 11-7 V. Gom. im, »mo rgATuwea irwwcATt. woau> noun aoEnvtu.. WATCHlMG .TrlE FIGHTER WHO" OPENED <4M EATERY HANDLE THE GNATWEI6HTS- £ N THANX AND A TIP OF THE HATLO HAT TO BARNEV 1 ROSS, NEW ybRK , N.y. • M arlow The World Today MAIN JOB FOR IKK IS PICKING KEV MEN By JAMES MARLOW WASHINGTON (AP)—Since he moves into the White House Jan. 20, General Eisenhower has a little over two and a half months to get ready for the presidency. One of his first and most ticklish problems is naming the right men for key government jobs, such a st.ho Secretary of State and the Secretary of efense, who will be members of his cabinet. * • • » He'll have to rely on them for guidance in the years ahead, and he knows, without reading any more history than that, of the past four years, how much damage a poor selection can do his administration. There are I wo main kinds of lobs which the president can fill by appointment. In one kind he can appoint a man for a certain number of years, fixed by law; in the other kind the jobs are "at the pleasure of the president," meaning the president can give them and take them away when he pleaseB. » * « » A White House researcher said there are ..about 660 jobs "at the pleasure of the president." They include: 1. Heads and assistant heads of departments. In this group are the cabinet, members—the secretaries of all the departments—and their undersecretaries and assistant, secretaries. 2. Others in the departments. Tey Include the general counsels, of each department (each department has a staff of lawyers and the general counsel is top lawyer). No. ( 2 also Includes ambassadors and ministers, and such jobs as director of Geological Survey, Commissioner of Reclamation, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, director of the Bureau of Mines. 3. Heads and assistant heads of independent agencies. A couple of good examples here are the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) and the Civil Service Commission (CSC). The present RFC administrator is Harry A. McDonald a Detroit Republican whom President Truman appointed. Eisenhower could keep McDonald or replace him. The SCS is run by three commis- (.VERNON DRIVE IN THEATRE — FRIDAY and SATURDAY — William Elliot - Walter Brennan - Marie Windor "THE SHOWDOWN" -PLUS SECOND FEATURE- Joan Ireland - Marshall Thompson "THE BASKETBALL FIX" — MIDNIGHT SHOW — Saturday Niaht Only FREE TO ALL ATTENDING EARLY SHOW "BRIDE OF THE GORILLA" — SUNDAY and MONDAY — IOCO BOYS MAKE GOOD// THOSE BUFFOONS ARE TYCOONS NOW 11 ABBOTT COSmiO GIANT ARCNOA jorct • iWQucimt Awn ELENA VERDUGO • MARY GORDON • GEORGE CttVEU ELECTRIC IN CAR HEATERS ARE NOW IN OPERATION AT MT. VERNON DRIVE-IN THEATRE These heaters make it possible for us to stay open all winter. SHOW EVERY NIGHT — RAIN OR CLEAR SHOW STARTS AT 7:00' P. M. \ FEATURE ABOUT 7:30 P. M, AND IS REPEATED sioners, two Democrats and a Republican. 4. Others in independent agencies. For example: the commissioner of education (in the Federal Security Administration) and the director of locomotive inspection (In the Interstate Commerce Commission). 5. Miscellaneous boards and commissions. Truman created such special groups as the Misouri River basin survey commission, the presidential commission on the health needs of the nation, and the president's committee on equality of treatment in the armed services. Truman appointed the members PLAY IT SAFE Don't Take Chances With Your Meats You May Save Pennies By Home Processing We Save You DOLLARS By Our Modern Methods of Processing MT. VERNON FR0Z-N-F00DS 1413 Bdwy — Phone 3680 L. A. Heffington, Owner Licensed Under the 111. Pure Food Div. CUT YOUR FOOD BUDGET Smears Poison On His Cookies By AuaeliUd Prut AUSTIN, Tex.—A refugee student from Austria, upset after a lover's quarrel with his young American finacee, committed suicide Thursday by eating poisoned cookies, a city detective says. The student, 27-year-old Heinz Berger, killed himself in a University of Texas science laboratory. His fiancee. Miss Elizabeth Tracht, 22, found his body. They were to have been married next week. Detective Merle Wells said Berger, described by professors as "very brilliant." had smeared cyanide on cookies and ate them. " Miss Tracht was hospitalized for shock. A justice of the peace returned a verdict of suicide. Cause of the lovers' quarrel was not learned. of those groups. Eisenhower can replace the members or abolish the groups. He can also create commissions of his own. 6. International organizations. These involve men appointed at the pleasure of the president to be American representatives in such groups as the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the International Boundary Commission between the United Stales ad Canada. • * * * But there are a number of other very important, government agencies where the top men were appointed by President Truman or even President Roosevelt for a fixed number of years and can't be replaced by Eisenhower until their term expires. For example, the Federal Reserve Board with seven members. The term of each runs for 14 years. There are others, like the Na-' tional Labor Relations Board (5 members), the Federal Communications Commission (5 members), the Securities and Exchange Commission (5 members), the Interstate Commerce Commission (11 members). In these agencies the terms of the commission and board members are staggered. MOVIE TIME TABLE GRANADA "Cyrano De Bergerac" 2:20 • 5:30 • 8:45 "Fargo" 4:00 - 7:15 - 10:25 STADIUM "Snows of Kilimanjaro" 2:20 - 4:30 6:45 • 9:00 PLAZA "Kid From Broken Gun" 2:05 • 4:05 - 6:00 8:00 - 10:00 "This Is Korea" 3:00-5:00-6:55-8 :55 Today DU.^ 2 Action & Sat. "rlaZB- Pack Hits! STARRE1I BURNETII "THE KID FROM BROKEN GUN" JOHN FORD'S a iwfKWMT MMU wticrotj THIS IS KOREA A mnuHG n*vjK now n MW ntUCOlOt , .Ow ant kern a* *aaa* iMrj * m taai ieSTARTS SUNDAY* You Have Seen "FRANKENSTEIN" - "DRACULA" Now See . . . "The Son of Frankenstein" STARRING Boris Karloff BeU Lagasl "The Son of Dracula" STARRING Lon Chaney Robert Paige The greatest love story you have ever seen! i JL* SOS* t * k 14 \Gmm\ TH1, HILDEGARDE NEFF-LEOGXARROIL-TORIN THATCHER rradnmbT MncMbr fctttaPUlbv DARRYL F. ZANUCK • HENRY KING • CASEY ROBINSON ERNEST HEMINGWAY'S TECHNICOLOR Matinee 65c 'Til 6 • Evening 74c • Children 25c at AH Times — All Yellow Passes Suspended During This Engagement — See It From the Beginning at 2:20 • 4:30 - 6:45 - 0:00. Gary- Cooper AS LONG LEX'KEARNY...THE RIGHT MAN FOR THE RIGHT GUN! WARNER BROS. MI«NT _ |PiJM HvfHV SPtuNGHEUi Rifle 1 WWWiERCOLOR ' ^ST^ HS • o ^aa* - mixw • CH^LK MABQUS aMRREMt FBAMK 0**S • ANDRE De TOW Starting Sunday Admisiion Adults 65c Kiddies All Time 14e Tax Inc. GRANADA Today—Sat. * . JTose Ferrer in "CYRANO DE BERGERAC" Plus William Elliott M "FARGO"

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