Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana on June 14, 1964 · Page 3
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Lake Charles American-Press from Lake Charles, Louisiana · Page 3

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Lake Charles, Louisiana
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Sunday, June 14, 1964
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Page 3
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GUN POS/T/ONS U. S. Jets Strike At Pathet Lao GIVEN AWARD -Wll- ton A. Reeves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dorcy Reeves of Millie, Is among 15 scientists who have received a Distinguished Service Award, the top honor conferred by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, for work which led to high quality cotton wash-wear textile products. Fire Damages Home in South Lake Charles Two alert Lake Charles women turned in a fire alarm that probably saved a $35,000 South Lake Charles home from complete destruction Saturday afternoon. The A. J. McD o n a 1 d residence, 4308 Louisiana St., caught fire from an unknown origin while (lie family was away resulting in the complete destruction of an electrical kitchen and causing extensive smoke and water damage to other parts of the house. E. J. Welborn of DeRidder, deputy state fire marshal, estimated the loss at $15,000 to $18.- OOn. Extensive damage resulted in the kitchen area where the roof burned through and caved in over the kitchen stove area. Flooring, walls and furnishings in the house were damaged by smoke and water, Welborn said. Mrs. Goldie Langley, 1300 Cactus Drive, in Sunset Acres, and a friend, Mrs. Sherill De- Mcritt. were driving on Louisiana Street and noticed what ap- neared to he "dust" pouring from the McDonald residence. They drove to a nearby store and asked (he clerk to phone the fire department. The two ladies then rushed hack to the scene, about 600 feet away, and knocked on th e doors, trying to alert the occupants. No one answered. It developed they were not at home. They then asked a group of young hoys to push two cars from the' garage to safely. Two fire companies, Nns. 5 and fi, answerer! ihe alar m which was received al 1:25 p.m. Assistant Chief Carl Cascio was in charge of ihe units. WASHINGTON (AP) - A knockout blow at Pathet L a n antiaircraft gun positions was made earlier this week by U.S. jet war planes, according to reports current here Saturday. The strike was reported to have been flown Tuesday, following the downing of two U.S. Navy planes over the weekend by Communist guerrillas. There was no official acknowledgement of the accuracy of the reports. If the attack took place as depicted, there would have been two apparent purposes—to clear the way for resumption of photo reconnaissance flights which had been suspended after the !oss of the two carrier-based planes, and to demonstrate American determination in assisting in the defense of Communist menaced areas of Southeast Asia. The Communists have described the attack as directed at a Laotian village, with civilians killed and injured. Reports current here said that Air Force F100 jc! attack planes blasted the Communist antiair- craft air positions with tactical j size conventional bombs, rockets and machine guns. The U.S. Air Force has FIDO jets based at Clark Field in the Philippines and at Okinawa and j rotates small units of both air! craft into Thailand for training | purposes. ! However, the probability was that the planes making the strike Tuesday may have flown from the Philippines. Both Navy planes lost last weekend — an unarmed Crusader equipped for focal reconnaissance and an armed plane flying escort on another mission —were hit by antiaircraft fire. The normal range of the F100 ! is about 1,000 miles, but this can ! be extended by mid-air refueling from (anker planes. This would make possible the use of FIDO's based in the Philippines, providing not. only the necessary range but extra time over the target upon arrival in the area. Meanwhile, the United States I is keeping a wary watch for ; possible Red Chinese interference with U.S. jets operating over Laos. Corps Worker Back From Two Years in Iran James Don Prudhomme of Lake Charles has returned from Tehran, Iran, after serving there for two years with the Peace Corps. While in Iran lie taught at the agriculture college at Tehran University, He and Hossein Oskouie, an Iranian art student planning to study in the United States, arrived in Lake Charles Friday night after a tour of European countries Including Italy, Greece, and France, and a boat passage across the Atlantic to New York. He and his Iranian traveling companion left Iran about the middle of May. Prudhomme says that he has no definite plans at the moment. Presently he is debating working with 'a Peace Corps group in training this summer or beginning work toward a master's degree. The local Peace Corps volunteer is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Prudhomme of 3805 GOP don St., and an honor graduate of St. Michael's College in vSan- la, Fe, N.M. South Africa Man Faces New Charges JOHANNESBURG. South Africa i AP)—Lionel Bernstein, white Johannesburg architect and figure in South Africa's major sabotage trial, was accused today on (wo counts under the country's anticommunism law. Bernstein was acquitted and discharged in the sabotage (rial. B Trial of the new case was set for June 26. Bernstein was granted the equivalent of $2,800 bail. The new charges allege he look part in activities of a banned organization and thai he attended a meeting though precluded from doing so under the terms of the banning order imposed by Justice Minister Balthazar Vorstcr. G/rl Tr/o To Sing At 1C Church ; The Mala-Toncs, a women's i trio from Kvangel College, will ; sing al, Glad Tidings Assembly iof God Church, 720 Alamo St.. al. 7:30 p.m. Monday, according !to the Rev. D. .1. McKinncy, j pastor. • The trio consists of Alexa '('lark, first .soprano; Norma 'Howorton, second soprano; 1.mi- rip Kelly, alto, and .Iiidy Tucker, • pianist. i Included in their presentation will he "Lord, 1 Want a Diadem," "Kvery Time. I Feel the Spirit," "His Name Is Wonderful," "There Is No Creator Love" and other spirituals. The trio is currently on lour through the East. Coast and South. In addition to vocal numbers, the program will include violin solos by Miss Kelly, Kvangel College of Springfield, Mo., is a four-year college of arts and sciences. Its parent denomination is the Assembly of God. SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 1964, Lake Charles American Large Crowd Greets Final Harper Rodeo Gary Kluinpp, !! - year - old junior eowboy, won the pole bending trophy tu climax the western horse show and hoole- nanny al Harper Urns. Arena hero Saturday night before 1,700 fans. T o m my Iluber of Lake Charles was second and received a hand-made western belt buckle. • merit of a in fh? final perfr>rmJ three-night benefit sinvv, audience stamped the mr*> how a success with their loud approval. ! A father and son team, Dan Chellelle and his son, Nc\V(on, of Iowa won the pick up /race in in seconds. Gary and (lires;- dry Klumpp, Lake Charles, were s e c o n d, and Burl, and Butch Foreman of Laca'ssina were third. A Monroe cowgirl. Caroline Cordell. won the hnrrcl r;it-e in 17 seconds. Dolores Granger, Sulphur, was second and Beverly Mythieson, Bell City,, was third. In the calf roping, Ftidley Chwivin of Haceland turned in the fastest lime of the Show, roping and tying his calf in 10.1 With Porter \V:t»oner, Norma seconds. Tommy Harper, Lake Jean and the tt'jigonmastc.r.s (.'h/irles, was second and Manuel providing music;il enlerlain- Henry, Alexandria, was third. Marching Upheld For St. Augustine ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. (API- Federal court upheld Saturday the right of Negroes to stage antisegregation marches in St. Augustine, and said real law enforcement, would stop any violence. The court stuck by its ruling, made earlier this week, after a day-long hearing. One of those testifying was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who has promised a "long, hot summer" of assaults on segregation in the nation's oldest city. Afterward King was released from jail on $!)OQ bond. He was arrested at a segregated restaurant Thursday. An aide said he was to receive an honorary degree at Yale Monday. State officials argued that night racial demonstrations created a danger to the peace. Two of them ended in violence when white toughs attacked Negro marchers. ''I suggest real enforcement, arrests and charges against Texas Man Is Charged With Vehicle Theft these hoodlums everybody seems afraid of," said U.S. District Court Judge Bryan Simpson in Jacksonville. He refused to reverse his injunction against a police ban on night marches in St. Augustine, a petition made by Ally. Gen. i James Kynes. ! Three of King's aides were ; also released on $900 bond. It covered three charges made aft. er a sit-in, intent lo break the ! peace, trespass and conspiracy. None of them took up an offer made by Sen. George Smathcrs, D-F'la., who said he would pay the fines of King or any of his I followers if they would 'gel out ! of Florida and 'stay out. Gov. Farris Bryant's chief investigator, Elmer Emrick, tes- ' tificd at the hearing (hat if both 1 white persons and Negroes marched at the same time, a perilous situation would result. I Eleven more persons were ar- i rested Saturday in integration (attempts at restaurants. One ; group was led by a white wom- i an, Sarah Patton Boyle, wife of i a University of Virginia profes: sor. ; Mrs. Boyle har written two ; books supporting integration. ; Saturday's arrests brought to ' about 80 the number jailed since King launched his massive anti- 1 segregation drive Tuesday. OOWNTOWN LAKE CHARU.S FATHER'S DAY SPECIAL MONDAY ONLY! FOR HIS DAY . . . GIVE A VALET STAND 11.88 Give clad n maple, mahogany or walnut, finished Valrt Stand for 1m nig day. Attractive pioee of furniture has hand rubbed all wood construction. Beautiful free standing design has a change and jewelry shelf, a built-in hanger for coats and a lop har for trousers. A most useful jjift. FURNITURE f STREET FLOOR S f f f- F I f i fin R Mother Looking For Dog A medium size black or brown and white dog believed to he owned by someone living in the vicinity of University Place is the object of a search being conducted by Mrs. Norman Stewart of 156 Lee St. Mrs. Stewart said that a dog fitting this description is believed to have nipped her 4 1 .year-old son on the face Satur day morning when he wandered awav from home with another child while hunting for blackberries. Her small son, (iienn, will have to undergo painful rabies immunization shots, she said, if in three days it cannot he determined that the dog being sought has had a rabies vaccination. The concerned mother said that Ihe dog's bite broke the skin only slightly and emphasized that her only interest in locating the dog is to determine what, if any, medical treatment should be given her son. Anyone having a dog jilting the above description and living in the vicinity of University Place, probably on the west side of University Drive, is asked to contact Mrs. Stewart at 4773830. Chester Green Acquitted ST. FRANC1SVJLLK, La. tAPi —Chester Green, a member of the Louisiana Board of Institutions, was acquitkd Saturday on charges of public contract fraud. The jury deliberated t h r e e hours and 55 minutes belore voting for acquittal. The verdict was unanimous among the five jurovs. A Fort Worth Texan, w h o used a false name to purchase a pickup I ruck from a local car dealer last year, has been charged with theft of the vehicle by Calcasieu Parish deputies, Sheriff Henry A. Reid ,Ir., said Saturday. Hist. Atty. Frank T. Sailer accepted the charges against S. W. McEntire, who formerly lived at 561 Mustang St., Sul• phur and at the Pelican Courts on U. S. Hwy. 90 West. According to the investigation, McEntire used his brother's name, Carl McEntire, of 2517 Vera Cruz, Ft. Worth, in obtaining a 1961 model truck September 27, 1963. from Larry's Trading Post. 2417 Ryan St Carl McEntire. contacted in connection with the transaction after note payments were not forthcoming and a local finance company asked the dealer for $1,066 due on the vehicle told deputies that he had not purchased the truck but that possibly his brother, had. Free Theatre h Sorted in N.Y. NEW YOHK (API -A theater without a boxoffjce is planned here by a producing trio who hope thereby | n encourage show- going by mure people. t The group, called Independent Theater Productions, has rented a 450-.seal auditorium on East Broadway, a thoroughfare on (he Lower East Side. In addition lo free performances, the project plans to emphasize cast integration. ; The sponsoring three. Anton Agalbato, Dan Greene and Au- jgust DePierre, plan to stage a I new show every two months. SIGNATURE IOANS $25 to $2000 AKKANGKD BY PHONE Arrange yuur loan by phone. Plek up ihe cash «t your convenience. No co-signers. Same day service. 34 Month Plqn JO Mu.uh Piqn You Get Mo Pint. You Get Ma Pml 110.00 — f j oo no:» so - w oo ias» s» — vjo M iujj.oo - MI oo M34.43 — J3SOO iHMOO — M4 00 MM || - 4J400 $19*1.00 - Ml 00 Abov« payments includ* ALL charge* DIAL FINANCE CO. O'Ol 4JJ-M34 ST. or thf man in your life . . . our handsomely gift-boxed ^\T Men's Set by Faberge Jv.'sk, refreshing Men's Lotion coupled with skin-toned Talc in a waterproof, breakproof shaker Aphrodisia or Woodhue 5.00 fhe DOWNTOWN LAKE CHARLES AND SULPHUR STAY COOL THIS SUMMER . . . WITH MULLER'S CONVENIENT CHARGE ACCOUNT ••••"•• «i^ MMMH •^••MM tm MH^ ^—m^m*i^^*m***mmm^nimf*m*mm*tn your old air conditioner might be worth money ! TRADE TO CARRIER BEFORE NOON MONDAY ! JUST 6 UNITS TO GO FOR ONLY 81KB1103 Carrier 10,500 ROOM WEATHER MAKER CHECK THESE FEATURES i- armor cabinet resists rust and salt corrosion. • Iliuhly Kcnsiiiu', level-temp ihrrmo.stHt. ^ 10 v.;o )»»;!> vrlnnlv ;»)' i)»i li.ux'i' ipuls the air ulH'IT You WHIH II '. 9 The quit?lot. operation this side of silence. f Positive ventilation and exhaust 9 Specially designed fans including new Turbo-Jet quift fan t .StaK^t-red coils to trap heal and moisture. 9 f loan air ilmuigh exiva large, washable filler. APF't lANCfS -- STREET FlOOR AND SULPHUR f flean, clasMc, tuncttonal flu<h desigu. 9 5 year farrier ujMdm>. 9 CSood Housekei'i"''i >eal of approval 9 The most i> I'L a i"i ilie li'-Kt dollars.

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