The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 25, 1937 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, January 25, 1937
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Page 6
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PAGE SIX BLYTHEVILLE, (AKK.)' COURIER NEWS Applying JVakrs Wiili Sjiowpjpw!' ry. ,, ;-j« , ,^ v , rf m ^^^ ' Grayson Declares Col• )egian Is Not Being •• Rushed InIp Big BouL By HARHY GRAYSON Sporls Editor, NliA Servlcj NEW YORK.—Robert Pastor ma: lack the equipment to hi? We trou- 1 We to Joe Louis in a scheduled 10- round battle,-at the:Garden, Jtin 29, tmlT can't subscribe to liio theory that the.•former New York University halfback Is being nishcd Into ills match wlt!i the Negro. Pastor has.been boxing for a.half do/,eii years. H is nov, or never for the deep-.clic.sted collegian. !• my opinion, he is-wlse to grab:(h( ; opportunity, :n^empt to fa.«tcn • :sirarigle,-h61d, and throw It and Louts for a (all, It Is true that avaricious managers frequently hurry bright pros peels Into .water .that'Is much lor d.eep for thorn. H also Is true thai- many of (licm \\ait lea 10:15 m realizing that their charges are rid- in? the. crest of the, wave. They fatl to look too.hot in a warm-up mid the big chance fades. Tnk? "Cunnnr .Barlund, for example. A Jew. days ago,',the Finn was-mentioned as excellent material for Louis.'. Then he wasn't so.impres slve In beating one Tom Beriuprei and practically has to'stnit nil over again IthcSigh his competition hasn't as stern, Pastor, hns been at long as Louis. There Is r j^uestlon about : Ills spirit, for lif s^foif seven titles as an amateur. 'Fighting Is a real thrill to !hc 22:year-old son of a sbanlsh mother and a Hebrew father. • • • Dig Enough If Good Enough Pastor liked to scrap so well thai he broke In as a sub-novice In the v ,New .York' Golden Gloves tournament in 1931 The Washington Heights boy underwent a Ion" period of.schooling by the talellghi •Height, lumlnaiy, Joe Welling at the New York Athletic Club ' Battling Bob hns dropped only' 1 ^pne close six-round decision in 23 'trips since turning piofesslonal !>• the fall of 1935. He subsequently; twice repelled Sieve Dutlas, lh r New Jersey bartender-waller who 'shaded him. Pastor Is .fresh from his greatest triumph—knocking down Raj Im- pellittiere In the opening heat nnd stopping In seven rounds the Old Spring giant who outweighed him 50 ;pounds/-<He marched front and centei with Unknown Winston; Eldie Simms and others good enou?) tOibrlng'oul the fact thai the rosy- ciiecked lad Isn't exactly a bum Slmms put him to the test de manded of all fighting meiHbr-oki timers Battling Bob-climbed ou\ of the resin six times to drop the Cleveland clouler 'nifil *, obtain draw. •'• . ' .Although a-bit short at 5 (eel 11 inches, pastor Is big enough if good enough He scales 183 pounds which is exactly what Jack Djmp sey weighed the attcmoon he chopped- down rJess. Wtllnrd to Toledo Jack Dillon stood only 5 feet 7 1-? inches, and I am among the many v>ho would like to see the Hoosier Bearcat sail Into Louis. A broken'nose is the only tip- off that Pastor Is a joung msn o' the ring. I suspect that he is proud-' er of that busted beak than hr Mould be. of an All-America blanket In football Fighting Is In hi- blood * • • Expect Plenty at the Prices Pastor appears altogether (or bright to want to be a newspaper reporter, which happens to be Mr ambition. He has the clear eyes of the perfectly conditioned athlet/ arid great competitor, which he Is His dork brown hair Is curly. H- would be as popular a champion a' was Dempsey. Battling Bob isn't overly endowed with listic- goods, but he's deac' game, and has the right idea, aboul fighting Louis Max Schmelinr proved that the Alabamsuborn dar- ky was a sucker for a rlght-hnnr' punch, .which happens to be Pastor's .best .stock "in trade. Schmelin' went into a crouch ard counter, punched. Pastor doesn't know wha' that is. so hell sail In in an earnest endeavor to keep Louis bac> on his heels. Nobody 'can fight bad on hU heels. Pastor will throw punches as lonr as he is in there, which is where 1 doubt thai he belongs Although anything can happer in a prize fight. I'm telling you this in advance, Just so there wll be no excuse for Jimmy Johnston and the Garden and Mike Jacob an<j the Hearst newspapers' nrlr fight department to ask, "Wei ' what did you expect at the prices? Your reply to that should b« "Plenty.'- 1 The tariff ranges from ?23CMo $1650, and try'to find th Swishing clown a slope of the champion,.' slows I ! •nwtootli Mmmlnln.s ht.s M>c.>i'(l with a in Sun Valley,-Idaho, Hans Hnuscr,* 1 Austrian ski perfect snonplow Chrlsllaiilix turn. ''"* It's His Chin By i, '' j i >< t Harry Grayson atONDAY, JANUARY 25, 1937 Train Plnnges Into Roaring Torrent ^^^^•^^•^^^•^^^^^^^•i •••^^^^•^^^^•• ^^ *• * f * Lancaster: Lose n Wrestling Sho\v Put Off Until Next Monday Night Tlie y,et*ly «icslllng proginin ol the American Legion, scheduled for tonlght.'at the indoor arena, 1ms been postponed until next Monday night weather and'flood condition! permitting, Promoter Clarence Hol- -.ler announced today. ' The Legion offlcial staled that due to the poor weather aiid roads, ahd because of the fact that-the Hut'aiid arena are being used lo store clothing and supplies for the refugees, It was decided to call off the card, ' : : Until .today they had hoped to go on with the s.how. The water had been driven out and attempts madr to dry the'build Ing but It was too wet and.ill-smelling, it was decided. .'•"•,:•;: In-.all probability an entirely new card will be arranged for next week, Mr. Holder slates. With Son Born, Manley Will Return To Ring STEELK Mo. — Announcements arrived here Friday of the birth of an, 8-|>ound son to Mr. ami Mrs. Roy Manley of. Washington, D. C., on Jan. 17. • ' * Mr.. Manley has been working us a pine fitter but gave "(his up the past week to enter extensive training for a comeback in boxing, two ears npo he was rated among the est welterweight boxers on the ost coast. an of Many Talents Heads Carnegie Museum Tr« Towers 301 Feel VICTORIA, Australia, (UP) — Australia's tallest tree In the Bri ish Empu-e Is still growing. Pore officials who recently measured the giant eucalyptus trees In 11 Cumberland Valley found that th tallest is, now toying with the 3 foot mark. TERRY, ABSTRACT & •REAtfTY CO. Abttracu; Undj tc Voua E. ft.- Terry, Fns.andMfT. f, Atfc. PITTSBURGH (UP) _ Students - the University of Pittsburgh nd Dr. Andrew AvInoiT mi inter- lini- man. He Is advisory proles- r of biology and nsslslant pro- c.«sor of fine arts nt the uni erslty, also director ot the Cnrnc- c Museum, nn nrtist. illustrator, omolpgist, astronomer, explorer, nguist, Orientalist and lawyer. Dr. •'AvInoiT speaks seven lan- lages. He has-it collection of 80.00 Asiatic butterfles gathered on noie than 40 expeditions In Asl- tlc Russia. .Tibet and the Pamli ounlrs-. Bom in Toltchln in the orovince of Rolynla, he studlet aw at the University of Moscow ervcd with the Red Cross In th World War, came to Pittsburgh i 1622. He calls himself an "ama cnr.'V Wide Use of Pecan Oil i'! In Salads Predicted ATHENS. Oa,. (UP)-Selcnllsts t the University of Georgia have Iscovercd that oil made from pc- ans. makes an "exceptionally fine alacl oil," is satisfactory for cookand: becomes only slightly rancid nflcr 10 months exposure 0' room . Icmperaluro. Dr. T. H. McHnilon, head of the department of horticulture, laid the discovery would mean Mlndf 'league baseball has re("•ed ninny a step since llie'-his- torlc mccling In Columbus, called to save Hie Illlle fellc-ws-nl'liie height .of Ihe depression.In 19?1. Judge W. O. BranihanvXpresI- dcjit r/ Y Die National Association' nroucUy announces that 3ff 'or mure,circuits will lie. In 'opera'tlon during Hie 1937 iseaiou _fhe Ncrlh Carollpa. Slate 1 and '(he Evergreen league la , Ihe Pacific ncrtliKpsl 'fclriady inrye qualified as new.'members. \ Several 'olh'crs. are ucarjng the .completion-'of or panl/alion and preparing \o make application ' ', , ' The Increase h tl)'n continuation of a slcauy ^rovtlh since 'l933, when nt one slage'lhcre weie oifly U' loop-i J 'l • •" 0 Once *lt i was brought home • to them tiiat lhe r ,ver^ ^[rupture of ojgini??^! ^Sasclfall v'a*i crunibllr^ • tlio nnJoH helped, of course But, the prevailing public opinion that Ihe big felloes are absorbing Complete ..ownership., and. .control .of outfits of lower ^classification can slum! 1 n great'deal'of correclion acvwdlntr- to 'Bramham. The able Durham, N. C,. man who heads' . Ifie VniMVr leagues loinls out that approximately only 15 per .cent of chilis in smaller circuits arc owned by major league .-.interests. 'That- comparatively small flir- ure may prove 'startling to the average -fan. but it Is due to the fact Hint he or she has confuset working agreements with' outrigli ownership '.and' control," : says Bramham. -'' '• •' ' ., . *, .«'.»- ''. '" I'ay for Right to Select ' A working agreement In real ily is nothing more than a' sale The major league club pays ' to the- right to select an athlete o two, but does not- make the se lection until the latter part' c the season. There lire many' sue agreements now hi * force - aiid th'e are Increasing' hi 'number The-minor league club' accect ins such, an agreement still Is lo cally .owned Jind -operated- and' I obligated to its'- major.- league as Eoclate only to the extent of as .signing a- player;, contract,,.or |vj to • the . big , league ichib'i .licwevel It simply has been paid-in ad vnnce I •• ' | As aii..ilhi5tration,-.,the ' Boatp Eled Sox may. give;: the' Dulul club $5000 for the ri»ht to selec two plavers be r ore Sept 1 Th money is paid in installments, thei Liiluth CMier receiving a check.' lor MOOn r n tlr- nrsb of each, month. , Before Sept. 1,:- the Red Sox, ; n>nnageinent names the .two Roberts had '• Lancaster on'lhc P ln > crs & Desires and Duluth cx- floo!-' iis Ihe bell sounded enilln* eclltcs assignment papero It is nothing more.-than a, sale. Po-'iton , does, not own - the I Duluth franchise But the imoressl"n Vrr seen created . that- such a' deali:ls absorption, of-, minor • league /iolu- igs b> the majors i Of couise It Is possible tliat Dosloi may be veij fortunate i'ily Beats Smith, Price First Round By J. 1'. FIIIKND Only one of Blythevillo's three entries In the Commercial Appeal Golden Oolves Loiirnamcnt,.'Mem- phis, survived the opening round. Saturday night at the Gaslon Community Center. James "Bab" Roberts, who play- cj n prominent role in the •uicc"ss 9f Ihe Blythevlllc high school Chlckasaws on the gridiron as an end, scored c-ne of the seven technical knockouts by putting away second of their scheduled tlnee Otis Lancastev, Forrest City, iii'the round scrap. Lancaster weighed 174!C. pounds, seven more than Roberts. - '•• Jay Smith; welterweight lost a close, hard fouglil .bnltli'to-'nir. I Ferguson, Memphis: An CAtia round i was/nnccssary to decide the win ner. Billy price, Manila'"! fine fflj l t weight, who fought under the loul ] banner, sulfercd a bloody nose In the first 'round with Billi Scharff Memphis, n prolegp nf Eddie "Kid 1 Wolfe, and' the fijht "was stopped SchartT was awarded a technical knockout. Derailed when the surging waters 'of the' Cumberland river •undermined the Louisville & Nash-1 ville. railroad tracks near Palmyra,- Term:, 15 cars of this-freight train were spilled into the torrent causing heavy damage. 'Hie picture, taken from the air, shows the remainder of the train still on the [ rails and all the surrounding area submerged. Service on the L. & N. main line from Bowling Green, | ; . K S'" lo Memphis, Tenn,,. was delayed by the disaster. Ctuisers Go Floating in Shopping District tb?-first round.-The blo<i n sharp ilg.lit Jiand punch, sent the Fovrest Citlan lo (he canvas. Refciee KiJ Wolfe ' picked him up with6ut counting' and before lie could get him to his corner the gong rang It took Roberts but a -few seconds lo put hlro out for good with another hard right. Lancaster fell face forward ngain and the official stop pcd the fight without counting The fans booed'the decision'of the Judges in the Smith Ferguson go, many contending that the local mlllnmn won. Don Buiton who seconded .-Smith, said tint he thought Jay. hnd'taken the first two by* big. margins. In the second Smith sent the Mcmphian to one knee wilh a right. Smith said afterwards that he had no alibis to offer, (hough he,' loo, thought hi had the betlcr of It. He figured that he was ahead aiid dldiyt really carry an offense In the last. It Is quite likely that the draw was made on Ferguson's 'showing. Young Price was not hurt at ;ill In his fight and could have easily continued, in spite of his bleeding nose, Jay Smith said; It is customary In amateur bouts tor the referees to sicp' in .and hull pro- an increased interest in commercial production of pecan oil and )ccan meal. Pecan meal, he added, would ie an excellent breakfast food and might,' wilh refining, be used ill cakes, cookies, biscuits and| muffins. , Fifty pounds of pecans should yield 12 lo 12',-i pounds of oil'or meal, he estimated. ceedings at the slightest sign of disaster in order to protect the youngsters from possible permanent injury. Man, 80, Skalcs Across Lake EASTPORT, Me. (UP)—P A Bibber celebrated : his 80th -birthday anniversary by skating across Lake Pennaciuam. It \vns the first time In IS years that he had been on skates.'- ' •' ' ' and g: t in the deal a player worth more than i$5,OOa.-Biit If has been proved tint in the long run a minor league club enjojs more financial prosperity than It • would without such agreements i * * * ' Home Ownership Essential ' 'Smaller leagues'!-have ""done better with th'e - agreements' ihari they have through the 'medium of the draft," explains Brainham. Draft's from Class C and, D Itng'uis practically are eliminated, but there were Very fc\v v before Ihe agreements "'came Into vogue. 'The smaller clubs cannot afford to string along with young players for several" years until they arc dcvelojied.' The larger clubs can. The result Is that the little fellow gels lib; cash without delay and the big fellow gambles that he will obtain players of value." . • • '•'•'. The point which Bramham wishes to make clear is that while the majors and the'higher classifications of minors ftrc co-operating and drawing on the smaller circuits for talent,- paying for 'it I hey go along, they' are not Luxurious cabin cruisers broke from thur moorm-"; and rode Hood waves almost into _. LoulsUlIes business section as pictured heie, as the Ohio rngeei in its worst rampage in Instoo 'As the -Raters neared a crestj of 50 feet, Louisville reorients fled their homes bj thousands Stores within tyo blocks of the central business section were flooded to the second sloij Telephone senice was abandoned, tram service .hailed, highways inundated in and around the Kenlucty metropolis ors doesnt -want baseball to getl City Has 130 AM Curfew away from the community Idea , I SANTA iE N M (UP)—A n°w Baseball nas one business that i curfew law aopted by the citj had to go back to the old days to ascertain the principal reason for its success That was—and is —rho'nie'.' teams -which ! towns ' consider .'(heir own. -No club Js stronger than I Is supporters, arid :omicil in ah-effort'to'curb law- essness provides .that any person ottering .'on-the streets or private premises after 1:30 A.M.'shall be arrested for vagrancy. It Is 'toiigh for of Sacramento, gel steamed cwned in • St. the for good people example, to up over Louis. an outtit taking troi. over ownership 'and cdn- Bramham, the man who led the movement lo bring back the'min- Hawalian Shells Varied HONOLULU (UP)—Collecting of land "shells may become a more popular fad than stamp collecting, at least in this !par't'..o[ America where 860 kinds of such shells are found. Hawaii is one of .the few sections of the United states'^ where such shells are available in-quantities. Some collections have up ward of 100,000 specimens. Read Courier News Want Ads ' Dream Reveals Church NICOSIA. 'Cyprus (UP)—An ancient church has been unearthed at Zakaki as the result of a peasant woman's dreams. So vivid were her dreams that she urged the Cypnis ;\nuqulttcs Department to excavate nt a certain spot. After a few- days of digging, part ol an anclem, church and two Byzantine monu- inenls containing skeletons \vere found. NOTICE TO MY FRIENDS .1 have accepted n position as Chevrolet sales- 'man for 'the Tom Little Chevrolet Company where I will be pleased to greet old and new friends. ROY CALVIN "WHEN W|TO TAXES You"^TAXIDERMIST!IM WWWCPAND VIM/» ^OCmV IET COU> WfATHER KNOCK THE STUFFING OUT OF YOU. WARM UPAUPPEPUPVCITH FALSTAFF wiNTE »•" the original WINTER BEER in Bottles / ST4JFFE& SHIRT Til .WINTER 6E l Try This Bottled Heat! It's A Lively Treat! It's a popular Winter sport—Falstaff Winter Beer! You'll find warmth and gayety in its tingling taste tang—pep In its sparkling tip. Keep a case in your home. Ask about the handy six-bottle "Hake-rrte-home"bags, ; ..'; .-•'•: The Choicest Product of the Brewer*'Art Play Billiards! •Wholesome Recreation Moderately Priced ; Blytheville Recreation Center 316 W. Main - Former Home of Bell's .Pharmacy GARNER APPlirrON MARVIN CHAFPELL Many species of birds have been completely destroyed because of the demand for their feathers for feminine adornment. W A N TED Government Loan Cotton Phone 167 APPLEBAUM BROS. COTTON CO. BertIg Bids. Blythertlle, Ark. The Maytag Gasoline Multi-Motor supplies smooth, dependable, inbuilt washer power that .a woman can operate. .Electric Maytags for homes on the power line • In a Maytag — the first self- powered farm washer—you get the benefit of more years' experience. You get the skill of the world's largest washer factory, combined with the best of material. You get the washer that has proved its worth in a million farm homes—the only washer with big-capacity, one-piccc, cast-aluminum tub ami a score of advantages ilcvcbpcil by Maytag. Let us demonstrate the Maytag and explain the easy payment plan. E. B. Gee Sales Co., Inc. 5lh & Main — • Phone 07 JUM.J? THE MAttAa COMPANY, MinilicUnti P FOUNDED 1143 • NEW1ON, IOWA MAYTAG

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