Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on July 7, 1976 · Page 14
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Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 14

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Garden City, Kansas
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Wednesday, July 7, 1976
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Page 14
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Photograph Marsquakes PASADENA, Calif. (AP) Signs of ancient Marsquakes in a long, steep-sided chasm that would dwarf our Grand Canyon have been photographed by the Viking 1 spacecraft circling the red planet. The Martian temblors apparently were the triggers for massive landslides that shattered cliff walls and sent rock and soil thundering into the deep canyon system, scientists said Tuesday. From Viking's point of view — 1,000 miles or more above the surface — the landslide debris closely resembled quake-caused avalanches on earth. Dr. Harold Masursky was reminded of the great earthquake that caused devastation in Alaska in 1964. "We have some gorgeous aerial photographs and ground surveys of great debris flows (in Alaska) that are similar in size and shape to the ones we are seeing in these Viking photographs," said Masursky, of the U.S.' Geological Survey. THE CIRCUIT Ridin' Parson, the Rev. Leonard Clark, stepped from this horse to greet the Rey. Nellie Holmes, associate pastor, and Ralph Gross, lay leader, at the First 'United Methodist Church old fashioned worship service Sunday before last. When The Parson Arrived Doll House Hits The 'Big Time' * * * * * * MR. AND MRS. G.B Mayo and their granddaughter, Susan, drove a horse and carriage to the old fashioned worship serfice at the United Methodist Church. More than 900 people attended the service and basket dinner to celebrate* the Bicentennial. NOW OPEN PRAIRIE LAND COMMUNICATIONS SERVICE ON ALL TYPES C.B. RADIOS F.C.C. LICENSED TECHNICIAN JAMES DOUGLASS-OWNER 910 E. FULTON GARDEN CITY, KS. 275-1830 By JOHN L. HOTARD Associated Press Writer DALLAS (AP) — Many women probably can remember the doll houses their granddad made from an apple crate, and the hours spent rearranging the small furniture he whittled out of the wood scraps. Their value was most sentimental and there was no great monetary loss when a little brother kicked one to shambles because somebody snitched to Mother that he was the one who ate the cake meant for the church social. Well, no longer. The craft of making doll houses and miniature furniture has hit the big time, threatening to derail the model train buff and ground the model airplane enthusiast. A furnished doll house could cost several thousand dollars and it's for the older kids, say, ages 30-75. Manufacturers of such' houses and matching furniture were well represented at the, Southwestern Craft & Hobby Show here recently. Some builders will sell the house, usually two or three stories, assembled or in kit form. But it has to be roofed with tiny shingles, bricked or covered with clapboard siding on the outside, wallpapered, and then furnished with real electric lights, flooring, rugs, pictures, furniture, a fireplace, or whatever the owner desires. The really creative craftsman who wants to star from scratch, can buy a set of blue prints for $3.50 saving himself a lot of mistakes. Joe Hermes of El Monte, Calif., specializes in wallpaper, but not the run-of- the-mill variety. Hermes carefully researched wallpaper of the colonial period and has come up with exact pattenrs scaled down to fit the dollhouse. He also has rugs. Hermes says the average person may build three dollhouses. The first is for his child or grandchild — rather simple in construction and not too expensive. The second one is a little better, refining the skills used to make the first one. Then there's the third one, built with a lot of tender, loving care and meticulously detailed. Any kid who touches No. 3 takes his life in his hands. Most who take up the hobby build and furnish the houses for themselves. They are the collectors, the ones who spend $8,000 to $10,000 furnishing a 'three-foot-square, 30-inch high house. The architecture is mostly from the past — Victorian, colonial, Williamsburg traditional, or three-story Savannah townhouse, as nostalgia plays a large part in the current craze. "Most of those build the house they grew up in—or wished they'd grown up in — as a child," said Hermes, who has a background in interior decoration and textile design. John Thomas, president of X-ACTO, says, miniature furniture is the third most popular collection item, behind stamps and coins. Thomas' firm has a line of period furniture from 1750 to 1850, carefully researched as to each minute detail, including the brass hinges and drawer handles. Again, the pieces are precisely machined to scale from furniture of that period, Thomas said. Even the glue used to assemble the pieces has" been tinted to match the wood. Page 15 Garden City Telegram Wednesday, July 7,1976 Each piece may run from $5 to $10, which can get expensive when furnishing a six- or eight-room house. Thomas said the miniature field is growing because it's family oriented, with the husband building the house and the woman interested in the interior decorating. "Model railroads and airplanes are male oriented," Thomas pointed. Once the house is built, decorated, and furnished, the final touches are added. Such items as a bird cage, vacuum cleaner, carpet sweeper, telephone, coal bucket, bed linen, towels, and bars of soap are available. Oh, and for the girl's room there's a miniature doll house. Dr. Howard T. Curry Chiropractic office 24 Hr. Emergency Care 276-8284 IF NO ANSWER 276-7606 708 No. Main -Garden City SYRACUSE SALE COMPANY Syracuse, Kansas SALE EVERY FRIDAY-RESULTS OF July 2, 1976 Cattle Walsh, Colo-rdstrs 445 38.50 Coolidge, Ks.'— wf strs 3110 36.25 Manter, Ks—wf str 695 36.10 Manter, Ks-blk wf str 815 36.00 Lakin, Ks—wf str 235 42.50 Ulysses, Ks—wf strs 2300 37.75 Sharon Springs, Ks—mx strs 1390 36.90 Syracuse, Ks—wf hefs 1620 31.90 Syracuse, KB—mx blk hefs 1578 31.75 Syracuse, Ks—mx char hefs 9375 31.80 Coolidge, Ks-wf hefs 3040 33.90 Tribune, Ks—wf hef 3310 33.25 Ulysses, Ks—blk hef 245 36.00 Richfield, Ks-blk wf hefs 1825 33.40 Sharon Springs, Ks-mx blk hefs 2705 31.25 Syracuse, Ks—wf cow 870 25.60 Syracuse, Ks—wf cow 1050 25.75 Ulysses, Ks—wf cow 970 27.25 Ulysses, Ks—blk wf cow ' 980 26.40 Ulysses, Ks—blk wf cow 1045 26.10 Leoti, Ks-blk cow 950 25.70 Sharon Springs, Ks-blk cow 1070 26.80 Sharon Springs, Ks—mx blk cow 5350 25.80 BuUs Ulysses, Ks-blk bull 1370 31.90 Kendall, Ks-wf bull 1300 31.75 Leoti, Ks-char bull 1420 33.50 Leoti, Ks-char bull 1630 31.25 Light and Regular Weight MEN'S SUITS $95.00 Values for $71.25 $110.00 Values for $82.50 $115.00 Values for $86.25 $125.00 Values for $93.75 $135.00 Values for .. $101.25 $140.00 Values for $105.00 SPECIAL GROUP PRE-WASHED JEANS FOR GUYS ft GALS SAVE NOW ON SUMMER AND BACK TO SCHOOL CLOTHING $14 $16. $18 $20 $26 $28 ENTIRE STOCK MEN'S SLACKS ,00 Values for $11.20 00 Values for $12.80 ,00 Values for.. $14.40 ,00 Values for $16.00 ,00 Values for $20.80 ,50 Values for ..' 22.80 Good Selection Patterned SPORT COATS Reduced to l /z Price Reg. $39.95 .. NOW$19.98 Reg. $49.95 NOW $24.98 Reg. $59.95 NOW $29.98 Reg. $69.95 NOW $34.98 Reg. $79.95 NOW $39.98 Reg. $89.95 .. .; NOWS44.9R Sport and Knit Short Sleeves MEN'S SHIRTS Selected Styles to $38.95 VALUE TO '23" SHORT SLEEVE.SHIRTS Reg. $3.50 NOW $2.63 Reg. $4.25 NOW $3.19 Reg. $5.50 NOW $4.13 Reg. $6.50' NOW $4.88 Reg. $7.50 NOW $5.63 NOW <22« to '29" SWIM WEAR Reg. $3.75 NOW $2.81 Reg, $4.00 NOW 93.W Reg. $4.50 NOW $3.38 Reg. $5.00 NOW $3.75 Reg. $5.75 NOW $4.31 -ONE GROUP- MEN'S LEISURE SUITS $45.00 Values for $30.00 $49.95 Values for $33.30 $55.00 Values for $35.67 $59.95 Values for $39.97 $64.00 Values for $42.6? $65.00 Values for $43.34 Reg. $6.00 NOW$4.50 Reg.$8.00 NOW$6,00 Reg. $10.00 NOW$7.50 Reg. $12.00 .. NOW $9.00 Reg. $14.00 NOW $10.50 Reg. $19.00. NOW $14.25 REDUCED 25% STRAW HATS SWIM WEAR SUMMER P.J.'s OPEN THURSDAY EVENING JULY 8TH IBANKAMEBICABPI 3 WAYS TO CHARGE .TOUH APrCARAHCg IS i nmmt 1 2345 6 AICMTOMU

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