The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 29, 1934 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, October 29, 1934
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Page 3
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1934 BE BIT IIEI (Continued From Piure One) elans who rule our destinies. "" chief peril to adequate regulation of the exchange now is the possibility that a nod from the While House may cause the commission to slow up for political reasons. But tills must, he remembered. Whether Wall Street is governed i" the Interest of ihc people or the interest of Wall street will dc|icnd on the commission. The original act contained provisions which v,oiil(I make it impossible for Ibo commission in IK a pro-Wall street one. Rules controlling margins, regulation* prohibiting brokers fiom gambling for their own account, drastic provisions affecting pools were in the bill. The Wall Street lobby with the aid of the United States Treasury Depart, inent, took all these teetii out ol thc act. They left ihe whole sub- Jcct up .10 a commission. As for margins, this was left to the Federal Iteerve Board. A good commission can be trusted to penetrate the pretensions ami fakes ol Wall Street and cnforcp f-xiund transactions, lint ihc future will depend on what kind of men make up these commissions. There Is no Buarantcc that they will not. in the end, fall under the dominion of the powerful interests they are set, lip to control, as has happened to our utility commissions, our railroad and banking and insurance commissions. Let us nol be too sure, therefore, that Wall Street will not come bath. To afford us some insurance again* 1 , this, however, I urge that the following measures should be 1. First of all, the trouble does not lie just in the slock exchanges. It lies in our whole financial system, which is ramshackle, unscientific—indeed the craziest thing in our civilization. It was not created by experts to meet thc needs of a highly complex society, it jus 1 , greiv, without order or design—a collection of fmprovisions without any logical relation lo the functions which u financial system ought to perform. Therefore we ought to make a study of the whole thing and effect a thoroughgoing reformation of it all—which means our banks, our savings me- tbantsms, our insurance organiza- ttyn ,our investment devices, our corporation laws and our trading markets. .We have made a beginning iP".'i Hiding, ^markets., (ABB.) COURIER NEWS jjonneQuintuplets Thriving, Photograph Reveals PAGE THREE'' mpllcallons of a world (hut grows dai|y before the wide eyes ,,f lll( . '„,„„„„ ,,„„„„,„.., Marie, now t'l'iui-n tr, t,,,,i. ~ .< ., ^.. ., . ... . ^unm, (itiiniupiets steady most of thc day, then ran Into selling lownrd Ihu end or lln 1 Fc«k.n mid dosed Mir, Ih'e i.olnl! lower. open hluh loiv 12:211 12:fl ri'XJ ra-i 1240 12-12 12110 J238 121-1 1240 mil 12211 123-1 1237 1227 1223 1228 1^:13 12201) Sjiols closed quid at liifio, olT 5. titock Prices YORK, lfi!fi,wl 20 I UP) — nt levels .slightly «X U °Tto°'J.h n o arlly . C ? 1 T l!rClal ! rnt f ° r " s '"" rt whll ° totorc l!l " for m^ ^n "S? m r'!,'°.^ !!!'>•• ** « h >V; >*"»' them ! gave 18 terms should do so from banks and whose existence is not imperiled by the freezing of its funds. Above all lending by banks In the stock market should be rigidly prohibited. that most bankers will not agree with these recommendations. That is chiefly because bankers, who may know a good deal about how to run a bank, know little or nothing about our economic system. Tf we want a reasonably stable economic machine wc must come to this. Above all, 1 warn solemnly against any continuance of the vicious holding company system applied in banks. Our people, 1 daro- •siy like all peoples, are obdurate about turnins a deaf car to warn- inss. But this one is serious. If holding company banking is permitted to flom-Kh it will absolutely destroy us. I warned about holdhv company banking back in the twenties. It was (his indefensible Ibing winch wrecked tfie banks of ~ ' " Cleveland and. for Detroit it matter, many other places find sent the repercussions of those failures through thousands of smaller banks. I ECC signs too ob- rious to be Ignored that it is to this astounding folly bankers will turn for their exploits if prosperity Now men who will wilfully vlo- lule any law should b2 indicted and tried for such violations and if the proof is sufficient they should be sent to the penitentiary as the law directs, unless something is done to stop this and done ciuick some of our people will become .so disgusted they will not attempt to vote 'it all. Of course, this is what the crooks and grafters wan't. Now in the future let me surest that the judge of thc criminal court flucslioii each juror whether Ihcy had an especial friend who act?:! as a judge al any election of recent dale that lie might favor or befriend by keeping off an indictment should he be charged with a violation of the election laws. Then in the event that any testimony were offered before such a grand jury Hie juror who nnsivered that he would not favor such frieiul could be prosecuted for perjury. •ludge Keck when instructing the grand jury at osccola gave special instructions tq mate diligent inquiry about thc.abuse of the election laws in certain precincts in tile southern part of the county Sllll this jury negleclcd or refused to <lo anything about the matter. N OW if t had been the judge, Ilk return. prohibiting security brokers from speculating for their own account; tb) prohibiting them from acting is bankers and making loans on securities; (c) prohibiting banks from making loans r>n securities or my oilier form of collateral save self-lltniklating obligations; (d) inking away from the Federal Reserve Board all control over mar- Bins; (e) Inking the autonomous lircction of exchanges out of thc muds of brokers and giving rcprc- :enlation to nil interests concerned n trading: and (f) finally putting dl. these things into laws and di- •ccttng thc commission to enforce lot make, these rules. 3. To reach our investment sys- em ,our coijioration laws which ire at the root of mosl of our roubles -should be completely re- *?ast. Corporations were never in- -~. -V,.*---S-<T- sed.-.mucli ; --to-- bc- done If Vc really want to make n serious effort to get the capitalist system to functioning again. The Editor'i Letter Box Sir. Driver cm Ihc Oniml Jury (To the editor:) the late Judge Treiber, when tie 1 fully expected. Now. if this committee had handed me the bill I would have secured the n'ccc.wary names and we would have had It submitted this year, but the friends of this committee will have two more years to work. the people. Won- i suggest 'mat those who want to 'cut the expenses 'of the county government gct together and have a bill drawn and submitted at our next election two years from "ow, but until then we must keep paying twice Tor what we gel for official service. This isn't/ fnirtoour ovcrbiirdencd taxpayers. If \ve can adopt n salary law we cnn soon pny our county debt and be on a cash basis. NOW we Imvc the best and most prosiwrous county in the state and still we arc heavily in debt. If we had our officer.? on a salary basis we would icon be oul of debt without raising our taxes 'and would soon be able to cut them In half with proper management. Now- again I refer lo the action at Osccola. While the Jury refused to indict the election crooks they did hand the officers a package about tiic filthy condition of the courthouse. The indy members of the grand jury are rcsjxmsiblc for this :u> they know something about c eanltness and I am really proud "Kit, we. have at last found ladles where they can do our county good m tn lly forcing our overpaid oilkm n at least keep oiir public liulldlii|.x Hi proiKY shape. At present (h:-y imisl tnke coiisklcrnhlp tlmu on to i spend the amount they are over I paid for their services. The poor ! overworked Junltor must also get a move on lilmscK or lose his IDIW occupiNl job. Yes, ladles. I Want to thniik you for this act. Force the boys u, keep their faces clean find nlso their places ot employ-' ment. | appreciate M,-. Tucker's story or ih« skunk. II. i s .simply „ proper drscrlptlon of what has rp- cently 1,-iVrn place. JOHN H. Lnxora, Ark. above Ihe previous close until the jlitsi hour of trading on Mu> stoi-k ; today and (hen reacted wmvuid in. modsrately acilve •Hover (in a break In whciu. A. T. mid T my 3.8 Aniicoiida copper 10 5-J •Dflhleljmi Rtct'l .,.',.,... 20 ]-a Chrysler 33 1-2 Cities Sriviri' ' i i-'j Oi'iH'ral Amerlcim Tank General Kleclrlc C-en^ral Alolors ,,....,. iKilloiuil ilinwstrr KOincry Wind .,..;. Votk GVnli'al I'urkard ._ rilHll|is 1'elroleiim ....'.'. Hfidto Coi'f> ; .Slimnons Beds Standard of N. J. ...!./ Texas Co \\\ V. H. Smclllnif"!! McKesson-Dobbins Markets Wheat tJCO Mny nee May open 9G 1-2 00 1-4 low ill I-I close 7-B Oli 7-8 i)3 fi-8 u-t 1-1 Jl 3-0 :i r.-s 1'! I-I! ri s-ii 30 I-2 20. 113 1-2 3 1-« Chicago Corn Sugar Contents of Beets in Nebraska c SCOTTSULUFP. Neb. (UP)-AI- Uiougli Nebrnskii's sugar beet crop ii'ill be ioniewlint lower tin's year than the btimiicr pioduclion ol 1033, the content ol the beets is running higher. Tests ol.s. B. Nuckolls, federal' crop expert here, show a content of 12.5 per cent in (he beels as against a content of 11.9 per cent at this time last year. Higher sugar conleni In Die.beets will mean higher profit from crop, producers said. . the open 74 3-4 7V high 75 77 :)-* low 73 3-8 elase li:i 3-1 7S 7-8 I notice in your issue of th-» 23 !"° to lakc strong ner lust, you publish a letter signed W. rcslst lh(! pressure. jury came in lo make its final report I would have ordered tliein ! back to the -jury room and told ! them to make a different rcnon ! cither report an indictment or re-' port that the evidence v-as not sufficient lo indict. Nov.- I fa!!y r,-n;;rc- from what has taken place recently that the good honest people of Mississippi county are up against n hard proposition ami if s going to take strict action of our criminal court to enforce our election laws. The crooks and grafters have absolute control in Mississippi county and It's go""• to lake strong nerve to be aiilc New York Cotton NEW YORK, Oct. 29 (Ui>| — 'otton closed barely siendy. open high low close )f e- 1224 123'' 1220 1220 Jim 122!l 12M 1233 12M March • ma 12311 1225 IliZli July ' 12-10 1240 1232 123'j Oct 1230 12:17 IJ2I 1221 Spots closed rpilet at 12-10, oil B. New Orleans Cotton NRW ORLEANS, Oct. 28 (Ul 1 ) — A tier opening higher due to btt- '•n' cables thc cotton mnrkel held Pussy Willow Picker Starts 25th Year of Work BOSTON (Ul')-Jolm Jacobs of lioxliury claims lo have on:> 'of the mosl unusual vocations In the country. I He's a pussy''willow plckcrl And he picks 'cm (he y m r around. Kccenlly he began his '.'nth veal 1 (is ii pussy-willow magnate. Jurolis gathers Uic pussy willow in the hud sing,., tnte them lioiu mid, (Imuigh it spcclnl process bincms them himself. Owning no automobile, h<. usY;; u-ulus mid trolley care mi his oMpedutuivs lo swnuips mid iiclds wiihln a rudliis of .IS miles of Boston. Ntvcr In MIC |,ast quarter cen- Utry hns lie encountered trouble in nndln K market for his wares. Head Cmini'i- News Waul. MX. lie Better Football Ticfcjs. „ Feature oi College Head CAMBRIDGE, Mass.,'(UP)—Having n 'dad who Is, picsident <n Ihifvard, the nation's oldest'mil- vorslty, Is ndvanliigcpits in more ways than one, "Teddy," young ion of Dr. James 11. Conjnt, has discovered. Asked hoiv !><> liked having his Hither president of .Harvard. Uic boy replied: "Now we act much better football tickets than we evei did lj>- forc." WAKNIN'tt OIIDKK IN THE CllANCEKY COURT, CHICKASAWHA OISTFUCT, MISSISSIPPI COUNTY ARKANSAS. CiciK-vIa Wilkerson, rlalutlir, No. OB25 vs. The defcntlanl, John Wllkeison, Is warned to appear, wllhlh -thirty dnys in thc coui'l named in the capllon' hsrcof and, answer ,lhc CTHii|i)nlnt of Ihc plaintiff, cieiievla Wllkcr.son.. ):tlrd this 20111 day of Oclobei, 'Ii. L. CiAINRS, Cleili, lly Ulliult Sartnln, n C. It, S. Ilut1«on, Ally. . WAItNIXCi OKDKil . IN ,'I'HE CIIANCKRY COURT, CHICKASAWHA U 1 S T R I 0 T, MISSISSIPPI . COUNTY ARKANSAS. Beula I'ruett, PlnhitllT, No. 5820 vs. Haymond I'rucU, Defendiin't. Tin; defendant, Raymond piuclt, Is Minii'c! lo appear within .thirty (liiys in (he coml named In the capllon hereof and answer the complaint of thc plalntuT, Beula Priictl. Ualnd tl'ils 2l)th day or odnliw, R. 1,. OAINRS, Clerk, lly Ulllott Snrtaln, D, C. R. S, Hudson, Ally. 2H-B-I2-10 NASAL CATARRH • •. Just a few drops up each nostril , Now Located ;,l Southeast Corner Walnut m, u second ADDING MACHINE & TYPEWRITER SERVICE BUREAU ' .IION EUWAKDS, I'roprldnr "inkis rjf ,,.l>ull( Typewriters, AMIn K Mtinhlnts anil C'alnitilon Pimm 71 • J . .,'< ended to be instruments in the lands of promoters to milk Indiis- .ry. They have grown so chiefly through the competition of certain thartcr-iiioninu-iiij; stales. The llrst ;l.ep is for Ihe United States gov- 'inment lo enact a national cor- mration taw. compelling all industries engaged in iiifcrsialr- coin- Mi Tucker on Ihe subject of illegal elections and other matters, reports of Ihe grand jury in particular. Now the report of tlic grand jury of ths this in a former letter when the acting Democratic Central Committee passed the matter up lo ihe grand jury (or further nntic-:i. My former experience satisfied me what that bndy would ilo and Hint was it would do nothing. Our grand jurirs are not what I they were many years :IBO. At Ihiil! lime grand juries obeyed Ihr in- 1 strnctioiis of (lie criminal court —and the hoys smoked them -ami the girls raked in the nickels and the dimes •and they sang ff a hot time in ihe old town; seem to have lost all respect . - <• «••, ito^v.Ji. ill. ; ,. an oath. Grand j urics nn( | =„,,„,,.., "a o of elections take an oath to sup- ™'° ~ ^-- ... ...... ^....v ,.*,,.,-1; , "•* V.KIIIJIIHI VULUt nerce to take nut national chart-1 ., ie . ""d. made diligent inquiry in }rs. -riius alone can corporate , , v "' milo " s °f Ihf crimiuni laws, aliuses be reached. No single slate t is llnt thc rasc ; ' 1 lllis .in net nlone. A company'can in- ,7 alldtlm i'- They seem to dodgo rorporatc in any slate 'where it !t'.. q . 'I'" or P 1! *>!ic interest. Ms iets thc mosf favorable' charter ;"«. That Ls why most of them go • Delaware, Maryland and other h slates. The natiohal goveni- nmt should then abolish holdin» •companies of al! kinds. Tliesc are he machine guns in UIR hsnds of : ." r ,'™™ t(; .Proii.bter.s-. To talk'about hcmsolves with tub resources >f a humued thoiusaiid men is Idlculom. Wy have .not a nation f emifxl nidivwiials. but or mil. Ions of individuals mid a few cor- JonUe monslers. We must deal wilh our bnnkin<7 yslcm. Wo Imve done little aboul Vou know. Mr. Editor, that I have been advocating, a salary bill for qmte a while, rising the'salary of each county officer. Those Interested got a certain lot of gentlemen logetlv.'.- and drafted a bill, so they say, but kept thc bill from those who n-nntcn such a law airt finally reported a jxicket veto, as Quick Relief for Chills and Fever and Other Effectn of Malarial Don't inn up with. i.:ie .Miffci-lng Malaria— the tec-th-chiiUerl-ig burning fever. Get , ° f ....... .u, Uilul HJ .M|[J- port llie laws and constitution of the stale of Arkansas. Judges of election lake an onth further liiat they will conduct the election lion. That not allow that lh,. v will to vo(r , ,;.| 10 js i o s law.s ana conr.litulion r ••••^ n, ••_!, VTITl, of Malaria by getting the ir.- ion out of your system. That's what Drove's Tasteless Chill Tonic does—dmtvoys and drives out Hie infection. At (he same lime, it oiiilds up your system against fur- Ihcr ntlack. Crovo'r, Tnst.-l t ..« Chill Tonic coutr.inr, l.-islclrss quiniiif- W |ii c i, kills Ihc infection in the blond. 1! also i-onlnins iron which liulld:; !«ri me lawn ana conr.litulion n'. *''" ™ 1U:1 '" S "'on wlii.-h liulld:; the slate of: Arkansas aii;| to dili'I' ;|> lllc Wra ' 1 "" (i tlcl P-' jl "ver- Een'ly. iiKliiirc into ui,, V | ol!U , -{(ronif Ihr effects of Malaria as Ihe criminal laws ., n ,| to h ',,., '«« «•> fortify against iv-infen- ihose who do so. ltfl »- Three arc tha effects you does We lial. The Glass-Sleagal bill lot go nearly far enough, mist have a national ystem. Here again the he s.-ime. While st.ile and .,..- ional systems are competing there in be no adequate banking pra- 'etioii. Right now our banking yslem is defunct, held up wholly iy the Federal Deposit Insurance 'mid. This, therefore. Is the lime recast It. .Financial institutions should be ' lly divided into tanking and : 'Bs or Investment, institutions, ••auks should, be banks and nolh- "S else. They exercise n sovereign unction—the creation of money, 'ccnuse all the money we do busi- 1C3S with is created by our banks luoiigh deposii currency. They uid' Thi r , Crorc '' c kcp! risit " y "'I "id-. Thts cn " be done only by tnitfng commercial bants to lend-' IE on absolutely self-liquidating Now- (he late grand jury of (he Oscnola district of Mlssliippicoi Iy had many witnesses who ipsti lifd or were ready to do so that banking " f »= Places in t], s S01 , u , cm) reason is. ' , uie v oullt y »>™ were allowed to vote without being questioned in rcfsrcnee to their (lualincations ail-' In -some instances their lickels made and volcd by the jud»« s f-ome have told mo that Ihis'nnii- pened u-ith them and they TCrc ready and willing to m.ikc oalh to, his cffccl. t don't know whether they did or not, as I was only pros- . w.'.m for COMPLETE relief. Grove':: Taslclww Chill Tonic In pleasant (o take and absolulcly safe, even for children. No bitter laste of| quinine. Oct a bottle today and >™ | tc forearmed against Malaria. Foi sale at all drug stores. Now hvo sizes—aOc and $1. Thc SI size contains !!'. tiinrs as much as the 5Cc size and gives you 2S 1 :; more for your money. —Adv. 1ft Dr. Floyd D. Howton, Dentist Announces ihe opeu- «f an office for denial practice in tKc Lynch Ixiilcling on South L>roacl\vay. 110 n the cigarette that's MILDER , the cigarette that TASTES BETTER

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