The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 27, 1955 · Page 20
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 20

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Tuesday, September 27, 1955
Page:
Page 20
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PAGE FOt*, BLtTHEVriJLE (ARX.T COURIER MEWS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1955 NEW ENSEMBLE — This is a lovely cotton ensemble in the new Frencb manner. The coat, in black, is a French adaptation — with new slim cardigan lines withh uge patch pockets. Its companion dress is a new French "chemise" sheath in white Both .coat and dress are styled in a wonderful new tapestry-weave cotton. Mrs. J. L. Westbrook Jr., is the model for the Blytheville Jaycettes who -are sponsoring the fashion show at the National Cotton Picking Contest. (Courier News Photo) . Cleanliness Assures Comfort It takes more than fresh sheets to make a bed restful and inviting. Fresh cleanliness should pervade the entire bed — mattress, cover, pad' and pillows. The old-fashioned habit of airing; the family bedding every day is still a pood practice, advises the Cleanliness Bureau. Bedding manufacturers empha- i size that proper cleaning and care \ are essential to obtain maximum wear and comfort from a mattress. , ' Every two \veeks, cotton inner- j spring mattresses—the most popu- < lar type with modern homemakers i —should be turned. The mattress' should be shifted end for end one time, and side for side the next, j Be sure to use a mattress pad. which adds to the life of the bed- j ding. Once a month clean the mat- i tress and bedsprin? with a vacuum ! cleaner attachment. At regular in- j tervals during the year, every mat- ' tress needs an all-over scrubbing with soap 'jelly whipped into a ] lather, preferably out in the sun- chine. i shioning with woods like birch, oak I and maple. Most-used fabrics are j sturdy cottons like homespuns arid i chintzes in bright yellows and reds. Fewer Uian 100 aborigines remain in the Andaman Islands today. More Experts Choose Cotton In Carpets Decorators Adviit They Are First In Remodeling Room With the stress today on (unction as well as decoration in home furnishings,, more and more of the nation's interior decorators are leaning toward cotton carpets and rugs as the ideal ftoor covering. Decorators advise that the carpet should be the first item selected in redecorating: a room, since it covers the widest area and serves to unify the furniture anu fabrics throughout the room. New color and texture effect* in cotton carpets this season offer a tremendous range of redecorating possibilities. Besides these style advantages, carpets provide the psychological benefits summed up in the slogan of the Carpet Institute, •Home Means More With Carpet on the Floor." More Quiet, More Wear Carpets provide more quiet, more wear, more ease of care, more comfort, more warmth, more safety, more beauty, and more value than other floor materials, leading decorators reported in a recent survey. The sound-deadening quality ot wall-to-wall cotton carpet and room- size cotton rugs was high on the decorators' lists because of the practically universal use of television in today's homes and the recent popularity of Hi-Pi phonograph players, which have made noise abatement a must. Carpet reduces household noise, especially on stairways and hallways which serve as "highways for sound." For families with youngsters romping across the floors, carpets were recommended not only for the anti-noise factor, but for safety reasons also. The non-skid surface of the texture prevents slips and cushions falls when they do occur, substantially reducing the danger of injuries. Carpets Cut Housework Not to be ignored, the decorators added, is the fact that nowadays less housekeeping help is available, and that carpets and rugs make the housewives' cleaning work lighter, since they are easier to keep clean than uncarpeted floors. A daily go- ing-over with a carpet sweeper, plus weekly vacuuming usually suffices to keep the carpet clean and attractive. Also noted WM that crpets give both "psychological" warmth—u much a> a "fireplace" according o one decorator — and physical warmth. Floor draughts and chills are substantially reduced and the warmth of the entire room Is greatly improved by the insult-ting effect. Chintzes Gain Popularity Early American furniture is en- ; joying a revival with its warm trie- ] Holiness and rugged simplicity. ; Styles feature luxurious cotton cu- i ALLENBER8 COTTON CO. 104 So. Front Memphis, Tenn. THE DIXIE PICKERY, INC OFFICE and PLANT, 42-44 West Illinois Avenue Memphis, Tennessee Phone 9-9916 C->«.<oondenc« solicited. We will buy or recondition for account or «*..«i* damaged cotton or tumpit loot* of all description. Fiber Quality to Be Stressed At Beltwide Cotton Meeting Importance of quality preservation in cotton's competitive fight with synthetic fibers was stressed at the ninth annual Beltwide Cotton Mechanization Conference at College Station, Texas. "Quality is a big factor in determining the textile manufacturer's choice of fibers »nd it is imperative that the cotton industry pro- vide him with the best product possible," according to R. Flake Shaw, Oreensboror, N. C., chairman of the conference steering committee. Mechanization is directly related to cotton quality, he explained. It offers the farmer an opportunity to lower his production cost but at the same time calls for more care to assure quality preservation. Efficient Operation Efficient mechanical harvesting, for example, demands that the land be prepared properly; that Insects, weeds and grass be controlled; and that cotton be defoliated in many cases in order to reduce leaf trash and staining of the lint. Olns must do a good job of processing to maintain high.quality. Conference speakers, in studying cotton's competitive situation, pointed up possibilities for expand- ing consumption. ' Agricultural Research Datest developments in a program designed to steadily step up agricultural research and education also were outlined at the meeting. Objective of the plan is to put science to work for agriculture just as hard as it is working for the rest of the nation's economy. Its progress was described by Assistant Secretary Ervin L. Peterson of the United States Department of Agriculture. Opportunities irrigation offers to increase yields and lower cotton production costs was analyzed by a pane> of specialists. They discussed problems faced by farmers considering irrigation. Land level- Ing and drainage, water supply, kind of system (when and how much water to apply, fertilizer and other soil supplement needs; hai- ards involved, costs and return* — all are factors. Dtmonitratlon at Temple A mechanized demonstration of defoliation, desiccation, and stripper-type harvesting was staged at the Temple Experiment SUtion. The mechanization conference was sponsored by the National Cotton Council In cooperation with the Texas A. t M, College >ystim, Farm Equipment Institute, United States Department of Agriculture, and Cotton Belt land grant coUegei. Cotton corduroy, completely washable, li an excellent material for making new fall draperlei. It U, easy to sew and a available this year In many attractive colors and patterns. Farm Mortgages Prompt Closings — Long Terms UNITED SERVICE and RESEARCH Incorporated 81 Madison Bldg. —:— Phone 5-5303 Memphis, Tenn. Originators And Breeders OF THE BELT'S BEST COTTON REGISTERED BLUEBONNET 50 SEED RICE Breeders Registered DeltapinelS Breeders Registered D & PL Fox Certified DIXIE HYBRID CORN Certified TRACY SORGO DELTA & PINE LAND COMPANY SCOTT, MISSISSIPPI

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