Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on September 6, 1952 · Page 6
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 6

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Mt Vernon, Illinois
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Saturday, September 6, 1952
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Page 6
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THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1957. LANDMARK IN HISTORY NIGHT BLOO.MING CACTUS — This benutifu] cjietus plant graces the front jurrt at the home of O. S. Williams, RFD 4, Rlt. Vernon. The cactus blooms about 4:00 p. m. and through the night, closing: early the next mornlns. The stalk is six feet fo^r Inches tall aud has had 14 blooms so far this suimucr. IMRS. MCCLELLAND MEETS atORONEY FAMILY —Mrs. Mary IMcClelland (seated, second from left), San Pablo, Calif., meets Mrs. Catherine Moroney and family face-to-face at the Moroney home (Sept. 4) In Chicag:o. She said: "I just don't know. I think it has gone about as far as it can go . . •" as she referred to evidence compiled by tno newspapers to show Mrs. McClelland could be the long-missing Mary Agnes Moroney, daughter of Mrs. Catherine Moroney, who was kid­ naped in Chicago 22 years ago. Front row (left to right): Harold, 7; iMrs. IMcClelland; Mrs. Moroney and her husband, aiichael; and George, 9. Back row (left to right): MikeV 20; Pat, 1.S; and WilUam, 12. * (AP Wlrephoto) LIBRARIAN SLAIN — Miss Georgine Lyon (above), 25-year- old school librarian in the Lawrenceville, 111., high school, was found shot to death (Sept. 3) in a classroom. Sheriff Garrel Buroon' said Charles Petrach of Gary, Ind., 25-year-old partially deaf Array veteran, related the fatal shooting while officers took down his admission on a wire recorder. Petrach said he and Miss Lyort had been engaged, but that the pretty brunette recently returned his'ring. (AP Wlrephoto) I LETS CO, MOMMY~The Tatum triplets, of Memphis, Tenn., ' 'are all set for a ride in their deluxe three-passenger stroller, and> (Wish the photographer would hurry up and go bye-bye. The trio* are the children of Mr. and Mrs. George E. Tatum, and have justj celebrated their first birthday. A| the steering-gear is Helen Jean-jj ette, and the /back-seat drivers are George Edwin, Jr., left, and 6 George Eugene YEP-IT'S A TOUGH DETAIL- RESORTING TO COOKING SCHOOL The Army has come up with a new gimmick to teach mess .sergeants ways and means of improving the taste and appearance of Army chow. They've set up Army Cooking School courses at summer resorts tliroughout the country. The embryo chefs do cuisine learn how to cook everything from soup to nuts and that includes juicy steaks and lemon meringue tarts. And not only that, but they learn to serve food with appetizing dash and style. Photos, typical of most resorts where the Array Cooking School holds classes, were taken at Hotel Le\itt, South Pallsberg, N. Y. The course runs for six weeks, with new Army cooks rotating each week. YOU'RE WRONG - Diana Morgan isn't lying down in a ,' brick catacomb. She is standing, 1 18 feet above the floor, at the I entrance to a powder magazine ! at historic Fort Clinch, Fla. Brickwork of the fort, built in 1861, is said to be a masterpiecei of the mason's art. Do you have a favorite picture of a view in Mt. Vernon or vicinity which you would like to have published ? If so, send enlarged picture or negative with description to Register-News Picture Page Editor. All pictures will be returned after publication. Army cookfCpl. Edward Jackson and Pfc. Richard Ilalvorsen try ««t »omei|pw ideas on the Bii«°cial flavoring and bioiUiig of steaks, PIc. Ilalvorsen's facial expression leaves no room for doubt that he likes lemon meringue tart served by Robert Llndeuberger. THE CHAMP —Mrs. Jacqueline Pung, 210-pound Hawaiian mother of two, became one of I the more surprising women'sj national amateur golf cham-j pions by beating another almost totally unknown, Shirley Mc-! • Fedters, 21, of Long Beach, Calif., 2 and 1, at Portland, Qr«, CNEA) 1 1775, FORT TICONDERQGA under Patriot OccupafionJl AP Newsfeatures THE CONSTRUCTION of this tortresfs was commenced In 1755, when Canada belonged to th« French. It was held by them until 1759, when Sir Jeffrey Amherst captured it for the British. At the outbreak of the Revolution, the British still held It with a small garrison. It occupied a strong position at the junction of Lakes" George and Champlain. One night In May, 1775, Col. Ethan Allen, with his Vermont Green Mountain, Boys and m few volunteers from Mast>uchusetts and Connecticut surprised ti»e sentinels on guard and captured the fort without bloodshed. This victory greatly encouraged the American Army and furnished it with solely needed arms and ammunition. The fort is now visited by many tourists and has a museum, containing relics of the FiMcii and Indian and Revolutionary Wars. riie "STUNT STARS" Ride on GOOD/V^EARS/ EVERY CAR, TRUCK AND MOTORCYCLE IN THE TROUPE is Equipped with GOODYEAR TIRES AND TUBES "Lucky" Lett's Trucks Roil on Goodyean "Lui -'IKj" Lotl taUes no chances on delays clue to truck lire failure on the road. The caravan of trucks ainj trailers that transpiirt the Htunt Rtar's equip- inciit are eciilippefi with di'peiidablo pood- .year Hi-.\Iiller Ini'U tirp9". YOU CAN'T BUY SAFER, LONGER-WEARING TIRES! • "Lucky" Lett's STUNT STARS take chances witii reokless speed . . . daring leaps . . . side-swipes, crashes and fire. But they take no chances on tires and tubes ... they use dependable Goodyear equipment exclusively. Goodyears i t : the tires and tubes that are best and safest for daredevil drivers ... are best and safest for your every-day driving. Make your car the safest car on the road. Equip it with moneysaving, big-mileage Goodyear tires and Goodyear LifeGuards, the safety tube that turns a blowout into a'harmless slow leak. See your Goodyear dealer today. GOOD EAR MORE PEOPLE RIDE...MORE TONS ARE HAULED...ON GOODYEAR TIRES THAN ON ANY OTHER KIND Mt. Vernon Fair Grounds TONIGHT (SATURDAY, SEPT. 6) GENERAL ADMISSION, 50c it

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