Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on June 22, 1976 · Page 4
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Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 4

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Garden City, Kansas
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Tuesday, June 22, 1976
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Page 4
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Editorial Page 4 Garden City Telegram Tuesday, June 22,1976 .Not Exactly Startling It comes as no surprise that most voters don't know where their candidates stand on the issues — the economy, crime, welfare, drugs, military spending, women's rights, etc. More than half of the 2,001 adults interviewed in an Associated Press poll admitted ignorance about their candidate's views. Part of the reason is that some of the candidates, notably Jimmy Carter, have been less than specific on some issues. But it is a bum rap to say he has been waffling on all of them. Even many of those who thought they knew their candidate's position were wrong. About 25 percent of Carter's supporters were wrong in describing his views on five major issues. Only about 20 percent were correct. The others just said they didn't know where he stood. The poll was taken after the primaries but it is doubtful the percentage will be any better after the party conventions when the two nominees will be campaigning head-to- head and forced to be more specific. One reason is that many voters will have already made up their minds and could care less about specifics. Another reason is that most voters can't remember precisely what their candidate said last week or the week before. Most people don't retain that kind of information. Oh, voters have vague pictures of their candidates. They know Carter is anti, Washington, or that Reagan will protect us from the Russians, or that Ford is honest and tries hard. They also know that whatever the candidate promises, he can't deliver without the help of a friendly Congress. \\\ (i. h. HAVING JUST observed home appliance breakdown week at our house, we feel qualified to report on service. It's good;*/ in this town. . . or we were just lucky. * * * A LOCAL WOMAN wishes to toss a bouquet to the U.S. Postal Service, of. all things! The Garden City branch, that is. Recently she mailed a bundle of things to her son who is off in another state on a summer job. The parcel was returned to the . local post office because the postmark was the only writing remaining on it., The label with address and return address apparently had fallen off. Checking into the parcel for a clue, a postal worker found an envelope in the pocket of a jacket. He called the home address indicated on it and got the mother who had prepared the package. She said she'd come to the post office and try again, but the clerk said she needn't bother. He got the sending address from her, made out the label, re-wrapped the parcel, and sent it on its way. She appreciated it. * * * IF YOU LIVE in a place surrounded by brittle trees and there's any kind of wind at all, you know this: a lot comes down that has to be picked up. * * * YESTERDAY was the longest day of the year, but only those who were up and with it from sun-up to sundown can appreciate that fact. * * * WE LIKED the bicentennial approach to Father's Day on the front page of the Telegram's shopper for the event — Yankee Doodle Daddy. * * * AFTER A full set of "rare days in June" last week, we're probably due for a round of well-done scorchers. * * * CALL IT loyalty to country and Steve Canyon. We are determined to keep reading the comic strip to the bitter end of Steve's bicentennial dream — in black and white even on Sunday. There are some good historical puns in it. Garden City Telegram I'uhliahed daily except Sundays and New Year's day. Memorial day. Independent* day. Thanksgiving day. Labor day and Christmas^ Yearly by The Telegram Publishing Company ^7li:i2:|-j :il(l North 7th Street (iarden City, Kansas K7MK Fred Brooka John Frailer I.e Roy Allman Editor Managing Editor Ad and Buaineaa Manager TKHMSOKSIIHSCKII'TION Ity carrier a numth in (iarden City **.« plus applicable sales tan. I'ayahle to the carrier in advance. Member of the Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled inclusively to the use (or reproduction of all local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news and dispatches. All rights flf publication of special dispatches are also reserved. (•or a couple of pcnui>c>. these primary duels pr'obabh make u* look a little stupid." Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 46 Deputy 3 Challenge 23 Ending SO Island'east ACROSS ITurf 4 Kind of residue 7 Road sign 11 Spoken 13 Chinese tea 14 Leveret 15 Pianist Peter 16 Sailor 17 Furnace 18 Narrow, secluded valleys 20 German title of address 22 Gazelle 24 — and Lauds 28 Villify 32 Fragment 33 Hindu garment 34 Son of Gad 36 Busy place 37 Century plant 39 Smeared with fat 41 A survivor 43 Sea bird 44 Waves breaking oh shore of Java 53 Irritate 55 German river 56 Exchange premium 57 Golf mound 58 U.S. coin 59 Numerical suffix 60 Greek letter 61 Small child DOWN 1 Carol 2 Russian city 4 Behave 5 Ruler of Iran 6 Zenana 7 Cheated (slang) 8 Hebrew letter 9 Miner's goal 10 Female swan 11 Process in math. 19 French coin 21 Short- napped Avg. solution time: 23 tnin. IPlAlPlAl Answer to yesterday's puzzle. for ten or pal 25 Spring flower 26 Wheel hub 27 Hurried 28 Peter or Ivan 29 Storm 30 Inland sea 31 Unit of energy 35 Wrath 38 Small shield 40 Epoch 42 Hackneyed 45 Worry 47 Correct, the copy 48 Verne's Captain 49 Waste allowance 50 Club 51 Ending for mass or man 52 Norwegian statesman 54 Large parrot WASHINGTON - In contrast to the haphazard sex on Capitol Hill, the Central Intelligence Agency for yea_rs has conducted an elaborate and efficient sex operation. Few national secrets have been more carefully guarded, but the CIA has provided kings, presidents, potentates and magistrates with female companionship. On a lower level, girls have been made available to defectors and the CIA's own agents. Sometimes, the CIA's guests bring their own partners. More often, the agency selects girls from its vice files according to specification. The agency also provides "safe houses" where the liaisons can .be consummated in protected privacy. The CIA's'^sex shop, acv cording to sources in a position to know, is run by the Office of Security. Although this division has many functions, it acts primarily as the CIA's internal police force. Through field offices scattered around the country, the Office of Security maintains close ties with state and local police forces. In each field office, a "black book" is kept of the males and females who can be safely recruited to entertain the CIA's visitors. The black books contain names, phone numbers and titillating details, which are gleaned largely from local vice squads. In Washington, for example, GIA agents used to pay regular visits to the police department's vice squad to photograph documents. The late Deputy Chief Roy E. Blick, who headed the "sex squad" for years, kept exhaustive records on "perverts" and "miscreants" Jack Anderson CIA Sex Shop around the country. He had a close, backroom relationship with the CIA, say our sources. During the 1964-74 period, the sex operation was supervised by security director Harold Osborn. Some of his subordinates, according to our sources, regaled their friends with stories about the sex episodes they were privy to. As they told it, they were called upon to fill some occasional bizarre requests. Each black book entry, according to sources with access to the files, contains some fascinating vital statistics — physical description, measurements, health status and sexual specialities. This inside information is used lo produce sexual part; I.-.ners for princes and potentates, defectors and agents. The congressional investigations of the CIA, however, skirted the sex operation. The House Intelligence Committee stumbled onto the information that the CIA once provided an unidentified Middle East monarch with female companions. We have learned that the king in question was Jordan's Hussein. It's the CIA's own foreign agents, coming in from the cold, who make the most use' of the "safe houses." When an undercover operative reports back to the United States, he is whisked to a "safe house" and a "case officer" is assigned to watch over him. The officer is • supposed to keep his charge happy and to provide for his needs. If oc- cassionally the need should be sexual, the right contact in the Office of Security is called upon, the black book is whipped out and the desired Art Buchwald Writes: companion is procured. The CIA uses sex for an even more seamy purpose. As we reported over a year ago, the agency has used prostitutes to lure foreign diplomats into love traps where their sexual antics were filmed through one-way mirrors. The film was later used to blackmail the foreigners into becoming informants. In New York, the CIA maintained adjoining efficiency apartments on the sixth floor. of a high-rise building in Greenwich Village. On the wall of the blackmail apartment was a large painting of two ships. But the painting was actually a one- way mirror.. On the other side of the wall, CIA agents could ; watch the action through the see-through painting and film the most intimate moments. The painting was strategically placed so that it gave the CIA observers a full view of the sofa, which opened into a bed. A Japanese screen, implanted with microphones, provided the sound for the CIA's blackmail movies. In San Francisco, the CIA operated a similar apartment equipped only with bugging devices, not observation mirrors. The New York apartment was used from about 1960 to 1966, the San Francisco apartment from the late 1950s to about 1965. Footnote: We confronted Harold Osborn with the facts about the sex operation. He denied that any such operation was conducted "during my tenure." A CIA spokesman had no comment. Our calls to the Washington police and Jordanian embassy had not been returned at press time. Public Pulse Need More Rec Support I would like to commend the members of the Garden City Recreation Commission, the employes of the Garden City Recreation and especially Leon Younger for their diligence in maintaining and improving ( the city's recreational facilities and for their attempts (many times not so well received) to expand the variety of recreational programs available to Garden Citians. The people involved with Garden City Recreation are spending an unbelievable amount of time on the summer Softball and baseball programs. I believe that through their efforts, Garden City has the finest facilities in this area. The recent umpires' clinic was another example of outstanding preparation by the recreation people. I cannot believe that anyone who attended did not benefit from the clinic. I would like to see ,more support for recreation in Garden City. Support is needed to acquire an expanded budget. More public interest is needed in all the programs. More parental support is especially needed. Garden Citians need to get out and take note of the people who are trying to improve the community and give these people their support — KENT PENDERGRAFT, 2101. East Mary. Ne ver Met Miss Hay WASHINGTON - I know it's hard to believe, but I met a high government official the other day who never met Elizabeth Ray. The reason it's hard is that according to Miss Ray's book, "The Washington Fringe Benefit," she met every person of importance within a 50-mile radius of the nation's capital. In fairness to Mt£S Ray she didn't claim she slept with everyone she met (though the Guinness Book of Records has suddenly shown a great interest in her), but she does insist 'she knew everyone from Eugene McCarthy to Henry Kissinger. The high government official, who. 'asked that his name not be mentioned because he had never met Miss Ray, didn't seem to have any logical reason to explain why their paths had never crossed. "I'm not much of a party man," he said, "so maybe that's the reason she left me out of her book." "But surely, sir," I said, "you could have been in a restaurant where 1 she was dining. She said she met a lot ot important people in restaurants." "I've wracked my brain," he replied, "but I don't think I ever ran into her in a restaurant. If I had she surely would have remembered it." "What about at .the Washington Redskin games? In her book she claims she met almost everyone of importance at the Redskin games." "I must admit that puzzled me because that would have been a place we could have met. I guess it was just chance that we didn't. My seats are behind the goal posts at the west end of the field and I understand she sat in a box on the five-yard line on the east end of the field. It's possible we could have waved to each other when the Redskins scored a touchdown. But if we did, I guess she forgot it." "What about up on Capitol Hill in one of the orgy rooms she wrote about?" "I never did hear about those rooms until Miss Ray started talking about them in the newspapers. I believe they were on the House side of the Capitol and I spent most of my time on the Senate side. I wish I had known about it in those days. It certainly would have 'been a nice place to wait while I was waiting to testify in front of a dull Senate committee." "But didn't a congressm.an offer to introduce you to Miss Ray and recommend her as a dinner date?" He said, biting his lip, "It's hard for you to believe this, but the answer is no. I don't understand why. I have a lot of power, I'm not bad looking and I like to have a good time as much as the next person. But neither Mr. Hays nor anyone else on the Hill had the courtesy to say to me, 'I'd like you to meet my secretary. She can type four words a minute.'" "Sir, do you think the fact you weren't mentioned in Miss Ray's book could hurt your career?" "Well, let's say it can't help it. That book is a 'Who's Who of Washington.' You're not anybody if Miss Ray didn't meet you. This town pays attention to things like that. I haven't had one call from a newspaperman or woman since my name was left out. I don't mind telling you it hurts." "Perhaps she disguised your name'because you were one of the people in the book she had an affair with," I said, trying to cheer him up. He shook his head sadly. "No, I read about every person she gave a phony name to, and none of them fitted me. I might as well learn to live with it. I never met Miss Ray and she never met me. I think the public will have to accept the fact and decide for themselves if they still want me to serve the people." There were tears in his eyes. "Everyone makes mistakes, sir," I said gently.; "It's a rotten deal that youj never met Miss Ray, but in a : few months people will forget it." "What a fool I was," he sobbed. "If I had known she was going to tell all I could have had my Redskin seats changed to her end of the football field." CRYPTOQUIP NM ULCCMF L K V I K M V U L W E L E N I F L W U M ? Yesterday's Cryptoquip - CRASS PARKING ON PARKWAY: A WAY TO GET A TICKET. (© 1976 King Features Syndicate, Inc.) Today's Cryptoquip clue: I equals O The Cryptoquip is a simple substitution cipher in which eich letter used stands for another. If you think that X equals O, it will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short words, and words using an apostrophe can give you clues to locating vowels. Solution is accomplished by trial and error. Let us help you get to know your new community as quickly as possible. Our hostess will call on you and present you with gifts, greetings and useful information. INTCVNATION A L . C If" *• Call 275-5644 Southwest Carpet Special HOST cleans beautifully without water. Easy-to-use machine does the work fast. No messy soaps or liquids. No drying time! And our low rental rate is now $1 lower with the coupon below. Bring it in today! THIS COUPON IS WORTH Apply it toward the rental of a HOST Electric Brush carpet cleaning machine. Redeemable at any until June 30, 1976. HOST dealer HiwayS^West 276-3261

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