The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 19, 1937 · Page 3
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Tuesday, January 19, 1937
Page:
Page 3
Start Free Trial
Cancel

JESDAY, JANUARY J9, 1937 Reports Few Delinquencies in District 9 and Sub-Districts. Promise Plenty of Enterl.aininont for President's 'Ball Collections of 103C Improvement •llstricl assessments through the •ihorlfr 'and collector's oltlco In 1936 were higher than In mimyj wears it lins \xcn revealed in a | |xirtlal report. • - Final records on collections for •ill of the Improvement districts •ire not yet available but preliminary compulations show a liigli per centage of collections. I Particularly is this true of Krassy Lake and Tyrcmza Draln- lige District No. <J and its siilj- iJistrlcls. In the Osccola district of Mls- fclssippi county $19.554 was extended in Drainage Dlst. No. 0 lissessments and a delinquency of fmly $1,000 reported. In suu-dis- Jtrict No, 3 of No. 9 $59,368 was Intended in assessments and only fcl,800 returned delinquent, ,ln, Rub-district No. 4 of No. 9 $l,'.!32 lisas extended and only $24 re|turned delinquent. In the ChickasaAvba district of Mississippi county in DIsl.' No. 0 ba.300 was extended with a tle- Ilinqucncy of only $189; in sub- District No. 3 of No. 0 $8,900 was fextended with iv delinquency of bnly $220 and In sub-district No. |4 of No, 9 $15.895 was extended Iwlth a delinquency of $3701 ] Final .figures are not available Jon Drainage District No. 17 collections but it' is understood that •they have Ijcen • far better than lin previous years. , : I Drainage Dist. No. 9 and its •sub-districts were refinanced Illirougli RFC loans about two years lago nnd the tax 'assessments ma- llei-rally reduced. Drainage Dist. INO. 17 has a similar refinancing • program underway but the as- •sessment rate would probably not • be cut as a result in the near •future because the rale hns been •at a low -figure, compared to the • maximum rate possible, for some • time. ' , The Irish ' potato Is really an •Indian potato. It was first discov- lered growing in America and gets Ills name from the fact.that it Icamc popular when introduced into (Ireland. - i.,»i BLYTHEVILLB, (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS Future Deb Goes Splash in Florida Committees in charge of the President's Ball, to be lielcl for north Mississippi county communities Thursday night. January 28, at the city auditorium, have completed their plans for fin evening filled with "iiisle, dancing and entertainment. Special emphasis ts being placed upon the entertainment, to be furnished by u committee made up of Russell l\at, W. J. Pollard, James H. Bell and P. B. Joj'tier. They vill present a program with music . for dancing by Hie Rhythm Boys, of Cape Oirnrdeau, Mo., an orchestra which received unanimous up- when it played here recently for a private dance. Other features of Hie program will be kept secret Mr. Pan" has announced that there will be Epecliil amusement during intermission, especially for those who do not dance but who wish to attend. These features will nriude special dancing by pretty girls, but that Is all thai is known. Kussell Phillips, general chairman, has announced that those who c|o not dance, but' who wish to purchase tickets, will have excellent seats for watching tlie dancers and are sure to enjoy the special entertainment, in addition to helping tlie crippled children of Mississippi county and the entire .country. Ticket Sale Underway The sale of tickets lias already gotten underway with Hugh Harbert In charge oC -the sale In Blytheville, assisted by Oscar Pendler, W. J. Wunderllch and Joe Applebaum, and w. M. Scruggs in charge of the rural sale, assisted by Tom Martin, Charles s. Lemons nnd C C. Lnngston. There Is to be ft contest among Ihese two committees as to which will sell the greatest number of tickets. Just how much "odds'' Mr. Harbert is to give Mr. Scruggs has not been announced but, many believe the race for honors will be close. Arrangements for Incidentals air complete. There will be free checking of wraps by competent people, Coca-Colas will be sold thru- out the dance for five cents each End there will be plenty of seats' for spectators. Ed Rice, Floyd White, Harry W. Haines and Floyd Acton are in charge of this committee. Western Union Cooperates Cooperating with t the national President's Birthday Balf commit tee, the • Western 1 Union 'Telegraph Co. has announced a plan which is expected to add thousands of dollars .to the fund for combat- ting infantile paralysis.' The Western Union has agreed to transmit birthday greeting, messages to the president free of charge. There will be u 25 cent fee tar. .each message 'but' all of •the .proceeds win be turned over by the^coihpaiiy^tqivthe. national Birthday .--Ball committee which in turn will distribute it, in the same way Birthday Ball receipts are•; divided-70 per cent to the communities in which it originated nnd 30 per cent to the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation Thus 70 per cent of every 25 cents paid for such a message from Mississippi county will be returned to combat infantile paralysis m this' county while the remaining 30 per cent will go to the sun- port of the Warm Springs Poun- | SYRUP OF BLACK-DRAUGHT. Easily given to Children E. $. Robinson Lumber Co. COAL I'erlOOOLbs. Kentucky Egg $3.25 Sahara 4.00 Acton ; 5.00 Blue Blaze Hard Coal $5.00 ' Phone 100 Willys Company Doubles Production in January Retail iVliveries of Willys can may be expected in greater volume '™ nl now on,, accord ing to LM Atchley, manager of the Broadway Sales Co., local dealer, who has been advised that January production of he Willys factories will be double that of December. The company. ;cr. Atchley said is maintaining a high percentage of its scheduled production despiteT unsettled conditions in the motor car industry and is rapidly catching up with advance orders, which were re^ V ™,,'"- rc ^ rd numter *'hen the *** .Most of the leather for gloves i oblamcd from sheep skin. pi» kid goat, lamb, colt, reindeer and do» skin also are in use in glove 'manufacturing. PAGE THREB Nancy Ryan, whose name will be found among the lists of New York debutantes a 'few years hence, splashes here in the Sea Spray Club pool at I'olm Beach, Fla. This granddaughter of Thomas Fortune Ryan, who amassed 'his millions in copper, was snapped while at the resort with her mother, Mrs. William Rhinelander Stewart. Kin as Charming as Noted Actress AclreSs Lily Langtry was Ihc :toast .of two; cpiUinehl5.';and |ier 'notable charm"srenis to' Have been transmitted lo l;er grand- dnughter, Mary Malcolm, 18 shown above just atler she am Sir Basil Bartlctt, 31, actor and playwright, were married in London. Postal Worker 44 Years Has 13 Years Overtime UTICA, N. Y. (OP)-E. S. O'Connor, superintendent of malls at the Utica ixxstoffice, has worked r years overtime since 1892, whei he quit law practice. ... 34,000 extra hours on the job, considering eight hours a normal day But he has never collected any extra pay—his overtime was voluntary. O'Connor Is widely known in the postal service as ';uncle Dud ley." Royal Hawaiian Band May 'Visit World Fair HONOLULU. (UP)—The Roya Hawaiian Band, organized by Kin§ Kamehameha V 28 years before tin Islands became an American territory, may : be • sent to the world's fair in San Francisco In 1939. If the trip goes as planned, it will be the.fourth visit of the mu slclans to the mainland. In add! tlon, an extensive Hawaiian Island! exhibit is being planned by a local committee. : rt ; 'DOHT BE A HUMBSKUli;5AttS<UlKRYSU! "jflER BKRAND NEVER OPT BLUE/" VtyEDTOfOOKMYGOOJEd «'/ Till | DISCOVERED ' FAUTAFF WlKTfR BEER DON'T FEEL STOVE IN., ^VARMUPANPPEPOPV ^ WITH WINTER WINTER SEEK in Bottles ! p n €> IT WONT LET WINTER KNOCK YOU COLD! Stay on the warm side of winter with Falstaff WinterBeer. You'll tingle to the peppy tang of this cold-weather hit! It's smooth, mellow, flavored with age. Insist on Falstaff -the original Winter Beer. Order by the case or in the handy six-bottle "take-me-home" bags. The Choicest Product of the Brewers' Art Strength of Frame Must ' Be Considered in Choosing New Roof. Hoof coverings vary about as much as any other item of building. Tire main types are the paper, impregnated, slate-covered shingles hi strips or In single units; wood shingles, composition shingles cement tiles, terra-cotta tiles, metal shingles, sheet metal, and slate. OM roofs may be renewed or replaced with funds procured from private sources under the Modernization Credit plan of the Federal Housing Administration. In building a new house, the type of covering is selected and the roof structure built accordingly. Most roofs require a deck or sheathing lo which to fasten the covering bill In some areas, particularly near the sea, wood shingles should be placed over shingle lath, us the un- •lerskle of the shingles must be mowed to "breathe" on account of the excessive dampness In Ihc air- otherwise they will rot. with all types of covering,'except the lm )>or and ivood shingles, heavy rooting felt should be placed over the dcck- "ig before tlie covering Is put on Of course, there Is a great difference In weight among some of ihesc materials, and the roof frame must be figured to carry the load placed upon it. for Instance, 2 Inch by C inch rafters may be all right for wood shingles on n certain house «'Wle 2 inch by a Inch rafters or even 2 inch by 10 Inch rafters might be needed for tile or slate in renewing an old roof, this ™' ler °[ wcl e»t nnisl have careful sidy, if the old roof Is of wood shingles, it may be possible to cover h,,i ? t ., rCm ° VI " g thc shingles, el eekM ? V'° !rame '"" st "« I , ?„• ? " mkc sllro ll ca » ™rry lie additional weight safely. If „ heavy s ate roof Is wanted, the frame will undoubtedly have o !»• considerably reinforced Designed for Living Steel Unit D i s tYib u ids Warm Air Truoughoul Room. consideration should bTgiveTtcnts use for heatin s in Spring and Pnll and as accessory heating in wintertime. To further this end. seven, mamiTflcturers have developed hollow steel units to be bricked In when the fireplace . Is built and The steel unit takes cold air from the floor of the room in w hich the fireplace is located or from th out-of-doors through a grilled open- me, heats the air much as would r arm-air furnace, and discharges n« • a i ed ,?; lr thr ° U8 " grillcd °Pe»Ings into the room. The heating o f the room air li addition to the pleasin. rad ant the usua™ 'r 10 0|>C " ""• collvert * unit of considerable ranartiv ™i r ther the unit being S ffaM-" fated of steel acts as a form for ic brickwork of the fireplace and thus aids in the building of a fire Place or good design. Fred Fleemsns Buy West Main St. House • Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fleemai have purchased the house 'at Cl «. Main St., now occupied by tli £CV. Carrol B. Cloyd and famlb ine modern bungalow has a firo- Ptace, flanked with built-in book shelves In (he large living rZ, " dining room, breakfast room > bedrooms and bath, which open into a hall, and a modernly equipped kitchen. The house heated by a furnace. The Ficcmans, who purchased the house from w. A. Grace, formerly of here and now of St Louis, plan to move there Feb ruary 1. G. O. Caudlll handled the deal. Mefal Protector lor Pipe Saves Cracking When (ilc Is lo be laid on a bathroom floor, any water pipes that 'f 55 1 ' iro "8 l > lh c concrete base should be covered by an arc!\ of expanded metal to allow .the pipes reedom to expand and contract without cracking the c'occrcte. Consider Sewer level in Planning J*} ew House One of tfcc most Important things to be checked bef& c starting the construction of «house, and In fact, before considering the plans complete Is the Jipih of the sewer n the street. Jfaturally, If there a 5 e to ,,te an y Pfimbing fixtures In the cellar, they ffuist be far enough above the scwoif to allow for proper drainage. • r This small home was built for nn insurance salesman at Hut Springs, Ark. The huiise contains a living room, two bedrooms, kilclien, breakfast nook, and batli. There is u screened |iorcli and built-in cab- inels in Die kitditn. There i.H ample closet spiice and Die Iji'il- roonm have cross venlilatiim. Tlie house, wliicli ccist ja.Ullfl, is built on « $;10I) lol. A mortgage for $1,600, which «na made by a private fiiuincial in- ulituliori, has been Insured liy • the. Federal Housing Aclrainis. tralion. Monthly payments, Including taies, intercal, flcrvice •charges, and amortization of the principal, amount to $20.88 ( month. FLOOR. PL A .oolc for Inspection Label of I h e Underwriters Laboraloiy. 'Hie use of chrnp nnd iworly made, exposed, cxiemlon wiring In the home h to be avoided at all times, because It Is consideied one of the greatest fire lia/inds we have today, with seurnl safe types of surface extension wiling now on thc market which are both 'inexpensive and easy to install there Is no longer any excuse foi the use o( cheap light cord for extension wiring; In roo'ins 'where there arc Insufficient omlets The safest thing to do Is la consult an expert electrician, New wiring inay'-liq Installed under the Modernisation Credit l>lnn of .the Federal .Housing Administration, llefoie Installing any expoicd extension wMng, the electric outlet from which thc extension wiring Is lo e\lcnd should be cnicfully In- spccted In order lo make sure that (ill connections nre tight and that Ihe outlet and the house-wiring circuit lo \\hich it Is connected are ot Kulllclonl capacity to carry the et- trn load of the cxUmslon wiring. If all Is in good" order, then a selection of the type of extension wiring can be umdc. .Several types nre available In which \\Jies are completely encased In n flat riibbcr or composition strip of good insu. latliig tiuallty which may be rigidly mUnchcd lo the nail. These strlo- wlring systems all have si«clal Ilttings for outlets, splices, ciosses, mid oilier connection 1 ). In older lo lie sine of-theli safety, It Is ndvis- ulilo lo pmchnse only mnlcilah haying (he Inspection label of the Undciwrlleis Lnuoialories and In no cn.so lo piovldc more than two Qidlcls ffom any one. extension 9in a built-in- outlet. Housing Question Box Q. We' are about lo do some remodeling of' nn old colonial house, and I want lo know if it would be appropriate lo Imve plaster arches between the hull and "the other rooms nnd between tlie li.ying room ami den. A.. -If you wish to preserve the character of the house, such openings would be quite Inappropriate. Colonial houses had ; doors on all openings to keep thc heat in thc room from escaping, u yoti want arches into the the hall, make them ns, smnll as possible nnd IHm them with wood. This would not be so Incongruous as plaster arches. In such remodeling work the services of an architect should be used. His experience nnd training will be Invaluable. Q. Is it better to build the garage attached lo the house or separate? A. If it can be located where it docs not obstruct necessary H»hl and nir, it is better to built It as a part of the house. Separate garages cut up Ihe yard and make it difficult to develop any scheme of yard layout. An attached garage is more convenient and often improves the architectural appearance of the house, placing thc garage at the back of the lot is merely a habit Inherited from the days of horses and carriages. Q. Is it safe lo paint the outside of 11. house"nt this lime of year? A. It is a hit risky, ns paint should not be applied In damp weather -nor when It Is extremely cold.. If a dry, fairly moderate spell comes along, you might tnkc advantage -of it. . Q. Wo nre going to Install a new bathroom' in our house, and I should like to know If there Isn't some wny to prevent Hint'unsightly crnck that always occurs where the piaster meets the tub. A. Yes; there is. Have the contractor screw n small steel angle of metal about, one-eighth Inch thick to the studs where thc tub comes against the wall, and hang the tub on that instead of on n wooden bracket, as is usually done. Use wire lath : for thc plaster and let the lath overlap the angle. The plaster should be Keene's cement. Q. What Is the best type celling light for a dining room? A. That is largely a matter of choice. However, the tendency Is away from the old umbrella type that hangs Just over the table. A Einnll cluster at the ceiling serves for general illumination, or the center light may te eliminated entirely nnd cnndlcs used on the table Candle light is pleasant and kind and is used extensively. ' Wall 1'lugs Placing electric icceptaclcs for lamp connections at n hclghl of -18 or 20 Inches- above the floor h nd- vanlngcous In two ways. It eliminate!, the necessity of culling the baseboard, and It helps lo keep the cords on the, llooi. . ,I!ead courier news Want Ad^ . FARMS FOR SALE .CAN 'GIVE POSSESSION AT LATH *? FBB. j rV«- Acres Loi'iiliou 90 G5 '10 83 20 ''10 ]2-l -10 80 ''near Yai'bro \ i)c;ir, Gideon ^iicnr Risco in Diinkliii Co. .in Diinkliii Co. . in Diinkliii Co. in Diinklin Co. in Diinklin Co. in Diinklin Co. Acre ?8B.OO •?!>o.no ?60.00 ?•'!<! .00 ?G6.00 S'16.00' ? 18.50 ?<10.00 §58.75 1037 Dojwn Paym'enl ?1500.00 ?1000.00 ?1000.00 S 510.00 9 2GO.OO !? iiGO.OO ! ? noo.oo ? 240.00 ? 760.00 iiahnce payable over 10 to 20 year period. I tmc a grcit miny other farms for sale, In tast Missouri, rtonn p-ijment from 15 to ZS% and balance over a 'in year period. rilylhcville, Ark." YOUR BOY NEEDS A HOME OF HIS OWN A permanent, home mean:, more to any boy or girl. 11 gives them ;i sense of stability, a.'certain pride they would not take in a rented house or apartment. Your boy needs to grow • up in his own home, why not provide . one now? If you are regularly employed and can secure a lot you may qualify for a FIIA Loan to finance your home. The payments may be made like rent. Consult us for more details. THE ARKMO LUMBER CO. PHONE -10 RE-ROOF!/>< You II be amazed at the Only $6.00 or ?7.00 per month for twenty-four months will pay for a CER- TAINTEED UNIVERSAL ROOF -under, the FHA Plan, Saves insurance costs too. Phone 100 for an estimate E.G.ROBINSON LUMBER CO. PHONE IOO We Do The Rest . LUMBER 100 ARKANSAS

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free