Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on August 2, 1956 · Page 29
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Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 29

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Alton, Illinois
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Thursday, August 2, 1956
Page:
Page 29
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1956 ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH PAGE TWENTY-NINE The Hopeful Hen Persistent Biddy Spends Month on Single Egg By I,EE HANKS Hardtn Correspondent HARDIN — No member of the animal kingdom Is so persistent as a sitting hen. She has no calendar and no way of counting time, so she just keeps on pegging away, often staying on the job for months, if undisturbed. And this brings up the oft-discussed question of the proper ap- pelation for a broody hen. Should she be called a setUng hen or a sitting hen. English, "as she is spoke,'* might lean toward the former, but authoritative English would embrace the latter. It seems that you "set" a hen and she "sits." Be that, as it may, Marguerite Arnold of Golden Eagle has a broody hen that has escaped capture and incarceration in the hen Jail for the cooling off period. This bird has been sitting on one egg, patiently and hopefully, for two months or more. She chose to do her nesting beneath a brooder house where she enters through a small hole. For all the good she has contributed to the Arnold excheqer she might as well have been popped Into the pot last winter. An interesting sidelight t? the career of the hopeful hen has been the feud she has carried on all summer with one member of the young flock that calls the brooder house his home. This bird was born to adventure. He early developed a habit of slipping out the door when it was opened for the bringing in of feed and water. Each time he did this, the setting hen emerged and tried to murder him. Miraculously he survived so the battle went on and on. Ixjng since the young chickens have been turned on the range. Every member of the hundred odd flock may pass safely by the lookout hole of Mrs. Hen, but let her pet peeve stroll past and she pops out with a squawk and the chase begins. And young Mr. Chicken has de veloped into something of a freak, himself. He has grown into an assortment of long legs, long neck, and small head and body. He looks like a cross between a road runner and a game chicken. A standout in a flock of orthodox birds, he has become the fleetest thing on two legs around the farm. Since he was two weeks of age he has never been caught. All of which shows that there can be a shade of humor even in HIP humdrum life of carrying Eldrod ELDRED. — Mr. and Mrs. Romaine Tate and family of Lomax spent the weekend here with relatives and were dinner guests Sunday of Mrs. Tate's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Holford. Joining them at dinner Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Glen Jones am' son, Keith, .and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Holford and family of Eldred. Mr. and Mrs. Charles King entertained at dinner Wednseday evening honoring their son, Robert, on his birthday. Those present included the honoree's family and his sister, Miss Shirley King, of Alton. Mr. and Mrs. Preston Curry and four children moved here recently from Onanga to the home of Mrs. Curry's father, Ernest Camerer, and will assist in the cure of Mr. Camerer, who is ill. Curry is employed on a timber job at Bunker Hill. Wilbur and Fred Schroeder spent the weekend at Decatur with their brother, Leslie Schroeder, Jericho, Biblical town 15 miles northeast of Jerusalem, is 3,500 feet lower than the Holy city and 840 feet above sea level. on the work of a farm. And the moral is that persistency is not alone a human trait. Who knows?—A close friend of this hen may slip into the covert of this sitting hen some day and lay a fresh egg. Then she might horome a mother. Spanker Really Hurt Worse Than Spankee BETHALTO — Many limrs a mother has said to her child before a spanking, "This is going to hurt me worse than it will you," and in the case of Mrs. Emil A. Grow, of Kingdom St., R.R. 1, Bethalto, it did. X-rays were taken of Mrs. Grow's right ring finger at Wood River Township Hospital Tuesday afternoon after she injured vhe finger when she missed as she was spanking her five-year old son and struck the floor. The X-rays revealed Wednesday morning that Mrs. Grow had suf- fernd a broken honn in the finger. X-Rays Show Nothing; Wnrng BETHALTO — George B. Neuman, 46, 220 Shnridan St., was tak en to the emergency room of Wood River Township Hospital at 4:2o p.m. Tuesday where X-rays were taken of his left foot. The X-rays proved negative. Neumann injured the foot on July 16 when he dropped a scaffold board while at work". I.lnda Bnrtee Honored BETHALTO — Sixteen friends of eight-year old Linda Lou Bartee, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Bartee, 708 Dugger St., attended a birthday party in her honor Monday afternoon at the Bartee home. Games were played by the chil- Two Bunker Hill Scouts Win OA BUNKER HILL. — Two local Boy Scouts. Ross Myers and Tommy Cagle. received the Order of the Arrow M C»mp Warren Levis last week. Bnnkor HH1 Notes BUNKER HILL. - Mr. and Mrs. George Lucco and children, and Mrs. Brent of St. Louis visited Tuesday at the home of Mrs. Minnie Gosch and Mr. and Mrs. Ross Myers. The Bunker Hill Unit of the Home Bureau is sponsoring a food sale Saturday, Aug. 4, in the Behrens 1 building, starting at 10 a.m. ' dren and refreshments were served by Mrs. Bartee. Plan Trip West BETHALTO — Two Belhalto residents left by plane Saturday for a two-week vacation to the Far West. Irene Giannini, 5 J .6 Spencer St.. and Margie Erzen, 217 E. Central St., will visit Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Las Vegas among other places on their trip. Both are employed at the Shell Oil Co., in Wood River. Worden Service Man Undergoes Surgery WORDEN — Pvt. RPX William Anderson, who is stationed with the 1 T . S. Army in V/urzburg. Germany, underwent, an appendectomy recently. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. \Vorden Anderson. Wordfn A'otes WORDEN Mr. and Mrs. Louie Bryan are announcing the birth of a son, Daniel George, Friday at 10 a.m. in St. Joseph's Hospital, Highland. The infant weighed 7 pounds 4 ounces. Miss Havnnna Ruemmler returned home Monday after a visit in St. Louis. Miss Ruth Ann Stellwagen is visiting with hor grandmother. Mrs. Mary Brandos, in Granite City. Mrs. Elizabeth McConnell of Roodhouse is visiting here with Mr. and Mrs. Gene Walton. Mrs. Ed Blotevogel and son, Danny, of Worden and Mrs. Anna Kcssman of Edwardsville have returned home after a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Martin Finke at Williamstown, N. ,1. Mrs. Elmer Noble was hostess to her card club at her home Wednesday. Honor scores were hold by Mrs. Joe Pazero, Mrs. Bethalto Rotary Shown Hotv To Grow Roses BETHALTO — Charles Tosovsky of Edwardsville and Roy M. Staples, sales representative for the California Spray-Chemical Corp. from Florissant, Mo., were guests of the Bethalto Rotary Club dinner meeting at the Zion Lutheran Church Wednesday night. Staples showed the group a movie on "How to Grow Healthy Roses," and Tosovsky answered questions from the floor on growing the flowers. Visiting Rotarians at the meeting were: 0. Glenn Summers, Jerseyville; Ernest Tosovsky Sr.. Edwardsville: antl Dr. B. F. Ward and 0. Derrell Smith, Alton. Her., Holy Cross, Mirage, Organ. Pep, Pope, and Rattlesnake are names of communities in Hew Mexico. Vacancies Filled Ritter Succeeds Father As Jersey C. of C, Director JERSEYVILLK — The Jersey-1 ville Chamber of Commerce has named J. Barry Ritter to its board of directors. Ritter is secretary of the Jersey County Motor Co. He was named to fill a vacancy created by the July 4 death of his father, Joseph A. Ritter. The elder Ritter had been elected for a three-year term at the annual meeting of the Chamber last June. Vernon R. Miller was elected second vice president, also to fill a vacancy in that post due to the inability of another director to serve. The board has also approved the selection by President Kenneth L. Searles of two directors as members of the executive committee, Gcorgn L. Emhloy and Harry Smith Jr. In addition the executive committee consists of President Searls. Vice-Presidents, Dan T. Edwards and Vernon R, Miller, Treasurer S. W. Graham, and Executive Secretary Emmett L. Mur« ph.v. The board of directors meet on the fourth Friday of each month and the executive committee on the secotjd Friday. Both are luncheon meetings at the office of the Chamber. Janus was a two-faced Roman god so that, no one could enter the edge of Rome without hii knowing it. Telegraph Want Ads "CLICK" Horace Mann founded the first state normal school in the United States at Lexington, Mass., in 1839. Frank Vazzi, and Mrs. Leonard I Schicbal. Following the games, | refreshments were, served. DRESSEL-YOUNG DAIRY GRADE A HOMOGENIZED MILK CHKK OU* AOS FOR Post Toasties ar 19 Red & White Orange Juice 39 last Good Brand Pork & Beans 2 2 5 C Princess Cremes De Luxe Sandwich Cookies..... £49* Put our ads on your "required" reading list because they are profitable reading for you. And remember, those savings you make weekly taking advantage of our many food specials, count up to large sums each year. Red* White CRUSHED PINEAPPLE 2£S* Red ft White SLICED PINEAPPLE.. 2 £37' Red £ White — New Pack — 3 Sv. EARLY JUNE PEAS... 2 £, 39« QUALITY MEATS Choice Cuts, Lb. 39o CHUCK ROAST . . . 2 to S Ul». Rib Ends PORK LOIN ROAST . , Luer'i SKINLESS WIENERS . Luer's PICKLE or OLIVE LOAF SMOKED JOWLS . . Luer's Klng's-X SLICED BACON . . . 1st Cuts Lti 29c ^49c -450 Lb 45c "•lie Tail-Good Brand Pork & Beans 2 19 Tatt-Good Shellouts 2-35 RED& WHITE S. 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