The Washington Post from Washington, District of Columbia on December 25, 1904 · Page 7
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The Washington Post from Washington, District of Columbia · Page 7

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Sunday, December 25, 1904
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THE THE THE WASHINGTON WASHINGTON WASHINGTON POST POST StJNDAT StJNDAT StJNDAT PECEMBER PECEMBER 25 1904 1904 BASEBALL BASEBALL GOSSIP SENATOR FRANK HUELSMAN seems seems seems destined for a a career of changing scenes. scenes. scenes. scenes. In 1903 'he 'he played played with clubs clubs in two leagues leagues last last year was was was a member of four dif ferent teams in the American League League and next season he he if if if booked to do some some more moving over the baseball baseball map. map. map. map. At present Huelsman Huelsman Huelsman Huelsman is is wandering on Uneasy Uneasy street street not not knowing -what -what -what -what -what fate fate has in storo storo for for him him but ho ho will not disappear from the diamond although he he may not be seen in the American American American League. League. League. League. Washington reserved the big big outfielder along along along with with with the others but It was anticipated at the the close close of of the season that he he would would figure figure figure in trade or be sold sold outright Rumor Rumor has has had it that ho ho will will so so to Boston Boston in exchange for Winter Winter and another rumor plants plants him in Milwaukee Milwaukee in the American Association. Association. Huelsman Huelsman did not "make "make good" good" last year as the ability of of players in the major leagues la la measured measured but under the the circumstances it waa waa not surprising that he could not get into the stride stride he reached in the minor leagues. leagues. After play- play- Ing with Chicago Chicago Detroit Detroit and St. St. Louis Louis Huelsman came to Washington Washington and was given given given a regular place in the outfield. outfield. From that time on lie lie played played played better ball than than in any of the other other American cities cities cities cities because he felt felt that he at last had found a" a" a" place to take off his hat and and coat and stay awhile. awhile. If If Huelsman Huelsman Huelsman remains In In fast fast company It will be only because he can pound pound "She "She "She "She ball out of the lot. lot. .for .for he is clumsy clumsy in the field field and not speedy on the the the bases. bases. Some Some Some of of the catches the big fellow fellow fellow made last summer which looked spectacular a first-class first-class first-class fielder would have have been been under and waiting for the ball. ball. If he returns to Washington he he will have to take his chances with tha tha half dozen others who will make a strong bid for for a place on tbe tbe team. team. Huelsman attributed his weak batting last summer to to the fact fact that he was was being shifted from from club to club club and it took way way the confidence confidence confidence he he would have felt had had he been sure of a regular place. place. In an interview at St. St. Louis Louis he said "I "I was with four four American League clubs in 1904. 1904. and and according to the newspapers I am booked booked for for Cantlllon's Cantlllon's Cantlllon's Cantlllon's Mil Mil Mil waukee team In 1905. 1905. 1905. 1905. I have had no notice of of my transfer to the American Association nor have I received assurances that I I will remain in Washington but I do not expect to go back to the the minors next -spring. -spring. -spring. -spring. I did not hit as well well as I expected for any of of the four four teams I was with in 1904. 1904. but was far far more successful after I Joined Joined Joined the Senators and be be came came settled. settled. Up to. to. that assignment I I was guessing where i i would be he next day. day. and the worry affected my work. work. I realize that I was up against the best best pitchers in the business business but at that I I aija aija confident that I I did not do myself justice and want another chance to to show that I can hit .300 .300 or better. better. I am not making excuses or promises. promises. All All I I want want is a berth with the Washington club club and I believe that I'll I'll get it and keep it. it. Fine fielding kills many base hits and I I saw grounds that would have gone for for a couple of Bases Bases or more in a minor league turned into put outs by American League inflelders inflelders and the outfielders were killing drives that that seemed seemed safe when they started from from the bat. bat. After After a new player has has made made the -round -round -round of of the circuit the pitch pitch ers and In and outfielders get a line line on his batting peculiarities peculiarities and the path from from home to first base is full of of difficulties. An understanding understanding of of the new drifting drifting rule as suggested by the minor leagues rejected by the American League and In dorsed dorsed at the recent meeting of of the National League League carries with It the conviction that both tha tha major and minor leagues will be benefited by the the enact enact ment ment of of of the rule the former by not being compelled to pay for- for- for- for- as many players players players as as formerly formerly and the latter through not not having their ranks ranks depleted by unlimited drafts. drafts. Under the new rule but one man man can be drafted from from from a club in Class AA and Class Class A two from Class Class B clubs and an unlimited number from from clubs in the classes below those those mentlpned. mentlpned. Where draft money formerly formerly was paid In two In stalments one-half one-half one-half at the time of drafting and the final payment when when the play play er was accepted for service service the following peason June 1 being the time limit un der the new rule not a cent of the draft money Is paid before the player is accepted on or before May May 15. 15. This means that the drafting club Is not out one cent of money if if the drafted man fails to make good before May 15. 15. How this will work to the financial financial Interest of of the big leagues Is shown by the drafting figures of last year. year. The first payment made by the two major leagues leagues to the the minor league clubs for players players players drafted in in the fall fall of of 1903 was something oer oer $10,000. $10,000. $10,000. $10,000. $10,000. $10,000. When it came came time for for making the second payment more than one-half one-half one-half one-half one-half the players were rejected the final payments amounting to only $4.900. $4.900. $4.900. $4.900. $4.900. $4.900. In all. all. there was paid f3r f3r f3r f3r drafted drafted players about $15,000. $15,000. $15,000. Had the same rule rule been in existence that is now being being advocated the two big leagues would have paid only $9,000 $9,000 for for drafting players or $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 less than under existing rules. rules. rules. rules. So far far this/year this/year this/year this/year this/year $17,000 $17,000 has been paid for drafted players players players this representing the first payment. payment. Under the new rule less less than this amount probably would have been Invested for for drafted players players players players .and .and not one would have to be paid for for unless he was accepted as as late as May 15. 15. The new rula rula is an excellent measure for for the minor leagues leagues in that it does not allow for for the depletion of the teams as formerly the loss of a man or two not being an extremely" extremely" serious matter matter and thus a higher standard of of baseball can be retained among the little fellows. fellows. The major major leagues have been at peace i i for two- two- years years years and only a few of the war contracts survived last season.- season.- Retrenchment of salaries was possible for for 1903 advisable frls frls year year year year and almost imperative next season. season. season. season. The second division clubs cannot stand the-abnormal the-abnormal the-abnormal the-abnormal the-abnormal the-abnormal the-abnormal expenses f they have have carried for four four j ears much longer. longer. The profits in the first first half of of the race are offset by the losses losses of the second period period of of the race race when the chances of a respectable position position position position are gone. gone. A major major league club /which /which /which was $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 to the good on July 15 15 quit the season season with the bal bal ance on the wrong side of its books. books. books. The The American .League .League had the advantage of of having five clubs with championship chances until near the end of lt season season The The The National League race was procession procession al for months and the attendance was affected even at the Polo Grounds In the closing closing series. series. The schedules schedules of the major leagues should be 'prepared 'prepared and their sal ary ary and other expenses regulated regulated regulated regulated so so as to practically Insure the second division clubs clubs a fair profit in their Investments. Investments. With 154 games provided for each club and salaries ranging from $40.000 $40.000 $40.000 $40.000 to $60.000 not more than half half the clubs in each league league will escape a deficit on the season's business under ordinary conditions. conditions. TJ3 TJ3 TJ3 average baseball fan has probably noticed noticed that at the the end of every season there is is more or less talk of this or that baseball baseball player quitting the business or or or Quitting Quitting his present team for the sake of of becoming a magnate or manager in some minor minor league town. town. This year year year the the crop has been larger than than usual usual usual but the re sult is Just the same not one of the bunch will ault ault the game voluntarily. voluntarily. In fact fact the players of consequence who have doffed the spangles of of the diamond of their own volition are few few few and far between. Bill Bill Lange the great outfielder was one and he has steadfastly refused to be coaxed back Into the game. game. Joe Corbett quit the game but waa waa finally induced to to break into it once more. more. John John Ward Ward the famous inflelder inflelder inflelder was still good for a few few more years on the diamond 'when 'when he he abandoned the sport for for law at which which be is is is a a success. success. success. success. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Pond Pond the Baltimore twlrler twlrler quit baseball to go to the Philippines as an army surgeon while Pete Hustlng Hustlng of of the Athletics gave up up baseball for law. law. Another star pitcher that that left the game while still in his prime was was Lewis who formerly twirled for the Boston Boston Boston nationals. nationals. nationals. nationals. Mike Griffin Griffin the for- for- mer Brooklyn Brooklyn outfielder also quit while while while a. a. star star but the reason for his retirement was because he was sold to St. St. Louis Louis and did not receive a portion of the purchase price. price. He was worth $30,000 $30,000 $30,000 $30,000 it is said and consequently did not have to worry. worry. There are others but not not many. many. The first qf qf qf last season's season's players players to start the rumor that that he he was going to leave leave the blg blg league was Catcher Kllng Kllng of of the Chicago Nationals Nationals whom rumor had to manage the Kansas City team. team. In fact fact Seleo Seleo began to worry but finally Kllng Kllng signed and tho tho Chicago manager naturally was rendered extremely happy as Kllng Kllng is is about the best backstop In that league. league. Then John Gantel Gantel and Jim McOuire. McOuire. McOuire. McOuire. first baseman and catcher re spectively of of the Highlanders were slat- slat- ed'to ed'to own manage manage manage and play with Grand Rapids In the Central League. League. This news floated around for for several weeks but the proposed deal fell through. through. Jlggs Jlggs Jlggs Donahue Comlskey's Comlskey's Comlskey's Comlskey's first first baseman was announced as the manager for for 1905 1905 of the Springfield team team of of of the Central League. League. This deal fell through through another manager being secured. secured. The latest Is Is Is that "Chic" "Chic" Fraser is going to manage a team in a town named Akron Iowa. Iowa. As Akron is credited with with only 1.009 1.009 1.009 1.009 Inhabitants according to the last census and as Fraser has been traded to Boston by Philadelphia it Is more than likely that the last has been heard of this report. report. The two -who -who were announced as having declared that they would quit the diamond In consequence of of fancied injuries or because an increase of of salary was not forthcoming forthcoming forthcoming forthcoming are Chesbro and McGinnity. McGinnity. the leading pitchers of of their respective leagues. leagues. The chances are however that one will will not be able to keep either out of the game until until his salary arm is pronounced dead. dead. The American League players certainly have the call When it comes to the big colleges selecting baseball coaches. coaches. Yale has invited invited invited Billy Lush the Cleveland outfielder while Bill Clarke the Washing Washing Washing ton catcher will be at Princeton. Princeton. Jack Chesbro and Willie Keeler of of the Highlanders will work together at Harvard Harvard and Lew McAllister the former Detroit player will will look after the University University University of Michigan candidates. candidates. Garland Stahl the Senators' Senators' first baseman will coach his former former college players at Illinois Illinois and Jlggs Donahue will take charge of another Western college squad. squad. Harry Harry Tate who is to manage Cumberland next season is is an old campaigner. campaigner. He was a member of the Haeerstown Haeerstown Haeerstown Club of the the Cumberland Valley League when it was filled with players who later came into national reputation reputation Tate himself was In the National National League. League. "I "I shall never forget the hot battle for for the pennant and the deciding game with Chambersburg Chambersburg says Tate. Tate. "At "At the fag fag end of the season season 1S93 1S93 1S93 Chambersburg Chambersburg was leading by one game. game. We played played at Chambersburg- Chambersburg- Chambersburg- and when we had finished our half of the the ninth had the game 2 to 1. 1. Tom LIpp LIpp LIpp who was was was in the Tristate last summer was pitching for us and and 'Whlty' 'Whlty' 'Whlty' 'Whlty' Shoenhut Shoenhut the old U. U. I of P. P. pitcher for for Chambersburg. Chambersburg. j j "We "We "We "We got the first two men out out but but old old Andy Costello Costello who was playing left field for Chambersburg got away with a punky punky single into right field. field. "Then "Then came Jimmy Sheckard Sheckard now the creat creat National League fielder to the bat. bat. I Sheckard walloped one one over our first baseman's head. head. It went up in the air and a mile away and cleared the fence fair. fair. "Then "Then it rolled foul. foul. Umpire Llmk Llmk Manlove of Cumberland Cumberland called It a fair ball ball and Chambersburg took the game. game. "The "The Hagerstown manager manager however was dissatisfied and appealed the decision to Nick Young then president of the National League. League. Young made the famous decision that Inasmuch as the ball had hit the ground in foul territory territory It waa waa foul foul regardless of of Its going over the fence fair. fair. fair. fair. "That "That decision gave us the pennant pennant as we had beaten Carlisle the next day. day. Charlie Pittinger was a pitcher for for Chambersburg at the time. time. Eastern Eastern League moguls Including George T. T. Stallings Stallings of Buffalo have been quick to deny the story reported to have come from Ed Ed Barrow Barrow to the effect that the Montreal club had dropped $10,000 $10,000 last season and that the Royals would be taken from. from. from. the. the. Canad'an Canad'an Canad'an city and placed in in in Richmond Richmond Va. Va. Stalling Stalling and the rest of the owners Insist that Montreal Montreal will be la la the league again next year. year. A number of managers of minor league clubs clubs clubs have their lines out for for BUI BUI Schwartz who plajed plajed first base for Cle\eland a while Jast Jast year year year year and who completed the season by leading the Independent Independent Association in" in" in" batting. batting. Schwartz Schwartz how how ever is is still tho tho baseball asset of the Cleveland Cleveland club he having- having- having- been reserved at the close of the season. season. Some of the minor league managers are unaware of this this fact and have negotiated directly with him. him. Schwartz does not -wish -wish to get into any trouble trouble and has ignored these communications altogether. altogether. altogether. altogether. The management of the club is also in receipt of letters asking the club's club's club's club's terms for hLs hLs release. The chances are that the big fellow will go to some American Association Association team. team. That he is a comer comer all right is still the belief of the Cleveland club officials. officials. Perhaps the real strry strry strry of how Selbach T\as T\as T\as T\as switched from the National to the American League and who made the ad- ad- varce has has never been printed says a Cclumbus Cclumbus paper. paper. Selbach told of It the other other night at a a little fan session. session. session. session. It was in the latter part of 1901 1901 when the New Yorke Yorke were plajing plajing in Boston that the Washington American League ciub ciub was was also playing the Boston Boston Americans. Americans. Own Own er er Fred Postal approached him there that day and said "How "How would ou like to play in the American League Kip Selbach replied replied naturally "What'sin "What'sin it Postal Postal came back with "Name "Name "Name "Name your price. price. He was then getting -.400 -.400 and Kip asked him him for for $3300 $3300 for a two- two- ear contract contract Pos-tal Pos-tal Pos-tal Pos-tal Pos-tal agreed to meet him in New York later and talk it over. over. The' The' The' The' day day day they w ere to have plajed plajed In New York it rained and Selbach did not get to see Postal. Postal. After the season he came back to Columbus and a letter came along from Manager Collins of Boston Boston Boston offering $3000 $3000 $3000 $3000 $3000 McGraw McGraw then wrote fiom fiom fiom fiom Baltimore saj- saj- saj- saj- Ing- Ing- that he would like to have him. him. too too Kelley and and Seymour were spoken of of as the other outfielders and McGraw said he wanted a g-ood g-ood g-ood g-ood man to play with them Kip Kip Kip replied that that if if the ealary ealary question would would be all all right he might play there. there. McGraw later went through Columbus and at a meeting at the Neil House Kip signed for for two ears ears at $3 $3 200. 200. The strange strange part of it was McGraw- McGraw- jumped back to the New New York Nationals as manager in July of :902 :902 :902 and and asked him Have You Catarrh Catarrh or Hay Fever If If you have and are neglecting to effect it it cure cure you are opening wide th door to consumption and death. death. No other disease la la rnoro rnoro rnoro certain to result fatally than catarrh. catarrh. One of Its chief chief dangers ll a in tha tha fact that Its Its Its existence is often unsuspected until it becomes chronic that lingering cold you are waiting to wear wear wear it self out is fastening catarrh upon you one of the most loathsome and dangerous dis ae9 which afflicts afflicts humanity. humanity. PR. PR. PR. PR. PR. AGNiEWS AGNiEWS CATARRHATJ CATARRHATJ CATARRHATJ POWDER Will cure you. you. Whether the disease 13 13 In Its Its first first first states states states or deeply deeply seated seated tlie tlie re- re- eult eult 1 equally certain. certain. It gives relief relief in from from 10 to GO minutes it effects a permanent cure in an incredibly abort abort time. time. Hay fever fever cold in the head head headache loss loss loss of of smell smell and deafness all yield promptly to its wonderful curative properties. Sold and guaranteed by Affleck's Affleck's Drug Drug Store District District Agent Agent Agent 1429 1429 Pa. Pa. are are are to go-along go-along go-along again again again which Selbach refused. refused. That year year when in. in. tha tha Wes with with with the Columbus bowling team in in December he sfgned with. with. Tom. Tom. Loftus to play at Washington on on a two-year two-year two-year contract at $4,000 $4,000 a year. year. The contract waa drawn up at DnbuQue DnbuQue Iowa the home of Loftus. Loftus. CANNOT MAKE MAKE BATTERS. BATTERS. BATTERS. BATTERS. Faults May Be Corrected but Hitting Hitting Hitting Hard Is a Gift Gift Gift From From the Chicago Chicago Tribune. Tribune. It is is curious how ballplayers can master almost anything for for which there is a. a. demand except batting. batting. A good player with natural ability 'can 'can learn to play any po sition sition on the team if he he devote devote himself to it but no one can can learn learn to bat unless unless ho ho is is a natural bitter. bitter. bitter. A beginner's beginner's beginner's beginner's batting oan oan be Improved to ba ba sure by correcting correcting certain faults faults faults and veterans can k p up by COM tan t practice. practice. But But But no amount of of advice schooling or practice can make a .800 .800 hitter out of of a natural .200 .200 bntter. bntter. bntter. bntter. It Is not long ago that there was was a great demand for pitchers and It wna wna a a common remark that any stranger stranger stranger oould sign sign a contract for a good salary if if he even even even told a manager he could pitch some. some. To-day To-day To-day there 1s 1s a plentiful supply of of pitchers on the market. market. Even the tall-end tall-end tall-end tall-end tall-end clubs of tha tha major leagues Washington and Philadelphia- Philadelphia- had first-class first-class first-class pitching- pitching- material on their staffs last season and another crop has ripened since then from from the minor leagues. leagues. A dozen years ago It was one of the easiest things in the business to pick up up a good -catcher -catcher or first baseman and any man who could bat well was considered a a a fair outfielder. outfielder. Nowadays Nowadays Nowadays however there Is a a remarkable scarcity of of catchers and first base base men men and an outfielder roust roust be something more than a fair batter and sure on the catch. catch. The dearth of of catchers is most marked. marked. One can count on his fingers the catchers who have not some pronounced weakness In their department of of tho game. game. When When When such men as .Duke" .Duke" .Duke" Farrell. Farrell. Jim McGuire and Joe Sugden Sugden can not only play but "make "make good" good" on some of of the fastest teams in the world it Is proof that young young young players have been trying for for for other positions to the damage of of the stock of backstops. That is not the only reason however. however. Much Much of of the scarcity scarcity of good Umber Umber Is due to the greater requirements to make a successful successful catcher with the development of of the science of baseball. baseball. A dozen years ago a man who could hold any pitchers' pitchers' delivery had a good wing to prevent base stealing and could hit occasionally could draw a catcher's catcher's salary. salary. salary. salary. Mike Mike Kelly the king of backstops backstops was the first to develop develop the science science of of his position and since then the standard standard standard for catchers catchers his his his been constantly raised. raised. The modern backstop is a far more important part part of the team's team's machinery machinery than at any other time In baseball's baseball's baseball's baseball's history. history. In a general way the catcher Is as Important In a baseball team as the quarter back In a football eleven. eleven. In football the quarter back Is the field general when his team Is on the offensive. offensive. In baseball the catcher Is the general on the defensive. defensive. Formerly the catcher signaled to the pitcher only. only. To-day To-day To-day his signals govern not only the pitcher but the infield decidedly and the outfield in lesser degree. degree. FIELDING IS FASTER. FASTER. Umpire Umpire O'Day O'Day Says Foul Strike Is Not to Blame for Poor Batting. Batting. Umpire "Hank" "Hank" "Hank" "Hank" O'Day O'Day is firmly convinced that the abolition of of the foul foul strike rule would not help help the batting so much as everybody expects. expects. O'Day O'Day bays bays the way to Increase the batting- batting- is to re lease all all the star outfielders and replace them with second-rate second-rate second-rate men. men. then fire all the infielders and put prairie stare stare on the diamond in their places. places. His argument is that the decrease in batting is not due to the foul strike. strike. He admits that it had something something something to. to. do with it. it. The The The The constant advance advance in the science of pitching Is another factor but the chief element Is the improvement In fielding fielding "Hank" "Hank" expressed the unique opinion that the batting- has not decreased decreased greatly. greatly. It only seems so. so. With outfielders profiting by years of of study on the part of- of- of- of- their managers playing differently for every Batter and with infielders equally shifty the the the batter now has small chance of making a safe hit unless he lines It straight out either over the Inflelders' Inflelders' Inflelders' Inflelders' heads heads or between them and not far far enough for the outfielders to reach the ball. ball. Anything hit in the air is worthless be be cause the outfielders ha\e ha\e ha\e ha\e their their -work -work down to such a science that they can tell or be told approximately where any experienced batter -will -will hit the ball nine times out of ten. ten. Some batters will hit deep into left or center field and short into right field. field. Others Just-reverse Just-reverse Just-reverse Just-reverse this this and every observing fan has noticed that the outfielders take take decidedly different positions as the batsmen change. change. This is even carried so far far that the outfielders change their posltiorts posltiorts according to what kind of a ball the pitcher is going to de liver so closely have they studied the opposing batters. batters. O'Day O'Day points as a proof of this to thp thp fact that a new man breaking Into a major league almost always always starts off hlt- hlt- hlt- hlt- Ung Ung well but is soon checked up and begins to fall fall off In his average average average average because by the time he has played once around the circuit every opposing fielder kpows kpows a lot about -what -what is golnfr golnfr to happen to the ball when that particular player hits it it There are a few exceptions like LaJoie but not many of of them them The Inflelders Inflelders are equally alert in the matter of playing- playing- deep or close close and nowadays anything hit on the ground rrust rrust ba hit fast fast through through the pitcher's pitcher's box to stand any chance of escaping the clutches of of the infielders. infielders. Likewise anything which goes higher than a a low line hit has lltlle lltlle chance of of of of getting away from the outfielders. outfielders. Tho umpire concluded his argument with the statement statement that batters were hitting tha tha ball nearly as hard as ever in recent years years but that the team work of a fast fielding bunch has been perfected perfected to the point where hard hitting was a long way from from being safe safe hitting. hitting. COULDN'T COULDN'T FOOL HIM. HIM. Ted Sullivan Encounters an Up-to-date Up-to-date Up-to-date Up-to-date I j j j j Irishman. Irishman. "When "When I I was in Ireland. Ireland. said Ted Sullivan "I "I made myself as much at home' home' as possible by talking to every son of the ould ould sod that I came across. across. My My name sounded well to them them and I guess that I made better progress than If If I had given out cards reading 'Herr 'Herr vop vop Suddlbeck. Suddlbeck. champion pancake eater to the Bmperor. Bmperor. Bmperor. Bmperor. "I "I was having a good time right along until one day I hired a Corkonlan Corkonlan to drive me out on a sight-seeing sight-seeing sight-seeing tour In In thp thp Jaunting car and and as usual usual struck up a conversation conversation conversation with the driver. driver. "Says "Says I 'Did 'Did you ever hear of Peter Maher the champion prize fighter of Ireland1 Ireland1 "Sura "Sura "Sura "Sura I did did was the reply. reply. 'Too 'Too bad ho ho had to be whipped by that Englishman Bob Fitzslmmons Fitzslmmons wasn't wasn't it I asked. asked. 'I 'I heard that Fltz Fltz put chloroform chloroform on his gloves or he never In the the the world could could have won from JIaher. JIaher. JIaher. JIaher. "The "The Irishman looked at me in surprise and in a tone of of disgust said 'Begorra 'Begorra he naded no chloroform chloroform to whip Peter over here here Ivery man In his county t te him him an" an" an" that's that's why he wlnt wlnt to America America "To "To change the conversation I asked the pilot of of the car why he did not make make up his mind to go to America. America. "Why "Why "Why "Why said I. I. 'the 'the cabmen in New New York make as high as J25 J25 In In a night. night. You would be a rlcK rlcK man in a year. year. 'Ah 'Ah 'Ah what are ye givln' givln' givln' givln' me shouted the bold Irishman. Irishman. 'I 'I drt ve cab In Philadelphia for for ten years and at last had to sell me poor horse to git git enough to bury the ould ould lady when she died. died. died. died. Sure an' an' It's It's little ye know about Amerika me lad. lad. Poisons accumulate In the svstem svstem svstem when when the kidneys are sluggish sluggish sluggish botches botches and bad bad complexion complexion result t Jte Hood's Hood's Sarsa- Sarsa- Sarsa- Sarsa- Darllla Darllla Darllla GAME GAME GAME FOLLOWS FOLLOWS FLAG FLAG Growth of Baseball Abroad Is Truly wonderful. wonderful. FOREIGNERS ABE POND OF IT Great American Sport Ii Ii Popular la la Honolulu the Philippinei Philippinei Cuba and South Africa Soldiers Engage Engage In Game at at Their Chief Diveriion Filipino Ex pected pected to Take Up the Game. Game. By SAM CRANL. CRANL. CRANL. CRANL. CRANL. Baseball Baseball follows follows the flag. flag. The national game game of of the United States ha spread to far distant countries within the last few years so so that now now the grand outdoor sport Is firmly firmly established In the Philippines Sandwich islands islands Porto Rico Cuba Cuba and in fact fact everywhere that the husky hoarty hoarty sport-loving sport-loving sport-loving officers jackles jackles and marines of of the United States na\y na\y na\y na\y have so gallantly and boldly carried the the Stars and Stripes. Stripes. Where "Old "Old Glorj" Glorj" Glorj" Glorj" waves there will be found baseball. baseball. It is a game that appeals to all peoples that are are blessed with real red blood and are progressive. progressive. The The Japanese are nothing If not progressive and even with their country in in the throes of of disastrous war they have found time to devote devote attention to our national game game and only only a few few days ago Iso Abe Abe a young Japanese collegian Issued a challenge to Stanford University of of California for for a match game between teams of a Japanese university and Stanford. Stanford. Acd Acd more than all all the Japs want to come to California to play the game. game. That In itself shows the youthful youthful youthful Japs Japs Japs have the Inborn courage and confidence of their elders. elders. It is said that Stanford will accept the deft of of Iso Abe and and will arrange for the match t once. once. It should prove prove a most interesting interesting contest contest and will mark a red letter day In the history of the game. game. It will ba ba a sensational era in in the life of the sport and in fact tha -t -t f ail ail athletic sports. sports. Baseball in in Africa. Africa. Baseball Baseball Is also flourishing in South Africa. The Transvaal Leader Leader a progressive newspaper has taken up up the sport and publishes full scores of games and records of of plajers. plajers. plajers. plajers. There Is a South African Baseball Association Association and the players of the different teams can hit the ball even If they have not yet attained the accuracy and agility in fielding that their American cousins have reached. reached. According to tho tho Transvaal Leader out of of thirty-seven thirty-seven thirty-seven batsmen who figure In the official record from July 1 to October 8. 8. twenty-three twenty-three twenty-three of of them batted over 300 per cent. cent. A player named Suter Suter of of the Wanderers was the Lajolo Lajolo of the league and he made our own "Larupping "Larupping "Larupping "Larupping Larry's" Larry's" record of .381 .381 look like a bush bush league mark. mark. Suter's Suter's batting percentage was .535 .535 .535 .535 Tho Tho Tho second batter to to Huter Huter waa waa Hotchkiss also of the Wanderers who walloped out a base lilt lilt e\ery e\ery e\ery e\ery other time at bat making making Us Us Us aveiage aveiage .500 .500 per per per per per cent. cent. cent. cent. cent. cent. That That That tl.o tl.o tl.o ba-eball ba-eball ba-eball ba-eball \Miters \Miters \Miters out in the Tians\aul Tians\aul Tians\aul Tians\aul Tians\aul ha\e ha\e ha\e ha\e ha\e ha\e ha\e giusped giusped the American American American American stylo stylo of reporting games is is is shown shown by the following .ummt-nt .ummt-nt .ummt-nt .ummt-nt in the Leadei Leadei Leadei Leadei "The "The diamond was was rry rry rry rry hard and as i consequence consequence consequence the ball frequently wore whiskers as some of tlie tlie inflelders inflelders can testify. testify. Wonder Wonder Wonder what what the African African African would do with Rube Waddell and the Chesbro spit ball They are liable to see them all right too. too. for both are erratic. erratic. South Africa being an English possession the fact fact that baseball has taken such a strong hold theie theie Is somewhat surprising for Britons wherever found found look upon the great American game as as a direct infringement on the sporting rights as established by cricket. cricket. "It "It Is only an off-shoot off-shoot off-shoot of of our old rounders rounders they are wont to say and that ancient game la la about on the the level of "one "one old cat" cat" and "barnball. "barnball. "barnball. "barnball. Englishmen's Englishmen's Cricket. Cricket. Englishmen are extremely conservative about their sports sports especially of cricket which Is considered their national game game and In- In- their own stanch little island island they have have always poohpoohed baseball baseball But when the Briton gets away from from home influences he becomes becomes an ardent admiier admiier of the American game and Is loud in his praise of the the sharp fielding tt tt tt develops develops In Canada South Africa Africa and Australia where there Is more hustling and time Is more valuable than than In the staid old Moth Moth Moth er country country the quick action action liveliness and all-around all-around all-around hustling of baseball that give a result In a couple of hours hours are fast fast becoming- becoming- more popular with with the colonials than cricket that requires as many days to arrive at a decision. decision. Great strides have been made In baseball in the Sandwich Sandwich Islands. Islands. Islands. Islands. Honolulu is the headuarters Just now now but the game Is fast spreading to other localities. localities. The game has has has has been played In the Sandwich Islands for many years but It was not until the United States was given possession that It flourished. flourished. In the reign of King Kalakaua nines from the officers Jackles Jackles and and marines marines of the United States warships that visited the inlands inlands inlands played played played in Honolulu frequently and several native teams were formed formed among them being quite a few few very capable players players I had a brother on the old United States frigate frigate Vandalla Vandalla that was afterward lost at Samoa Samoa and he was the catcher on the Vandalla Vandalla team. team. The old ship stopped at Honolulu frequently In the 80'p 80'p 80'p 80'p and the ball nine Invariably had its games there there on on those visits. visits. The natives natives took to the game very very very quickly quickly and soon learned to enjoy enjoy enjoy It. It. They welcomed every arrival arrival arrival of the Vandalla Vandalla Vandalla with loud demonstrations demonstrations of joy and there -was -was a general holiday w henever henever the game was plaj ed. ed. Chinaman on Team Team The players players of the ship's ship's ship's ship's team were entertained lavishly and gl\en gl\en gl\en gl\en the freedom of of the city. city. That was twenty ear ago. ago. and to-day to-day to-day there is an organized league and a a regular championship schedule schedule To show that the game appeals appeals to all nationalities on the islands islands islands a Chinaman plays plays plays third base on the leading club and has the reputation of being the best play play er In the whole league. league. In the Philippines also there Is a league of several clubs made up mostly of sol sol sol diers diers diers diers and sailors sailors Just now now and there aie aie aie several Inclosed grounds in Manila to which are.attracted are.attracted big crowds whenever tlio tlio championship games are played. played. played. played. Among the spectators spectators are large numbers of Filipinos and they are not the least interested. interested. The latter are sure to take up the sport shortly. shortly. I know they can learn to play play play the game for when the Giants Giants w ere In Savannah for practice last spring a team of soldiers from from a a nearby fort played an exhibition game with the Gl- Gl- cnts cnts cnts cnts and with them was a young Filipino who while he did not play on the soldier team practiced with them and showed surprising proficiency proficiency And if he is a sample of of the Filipino rooter rooter they will all be "well "well -wells" -wells" -wells" In the Philippines in in short order. order. The brown-skinned brown-skinned brown-skinned youth knew all the fine points of the game as well as Henry Chadwlck Chadwlck and he licked at least a half dozen Savannah darkles darkles darkles who had the temerity to root against his soldier boys. boys. I I umpired the game and he was going to punch me. me. Nothing strange strange about that that but It only shows how intensely interested the Filipinos become over the game. game. He was the cockiest most courageous little fellow I ever saw. saw. I have thought well of the Filipinos ever since. since. If ho could have reached me I I might have thought still more of of them. them. Cause and Effect. Effect. From the London Globes Globes From Lord Lansdowre's Lansdowre's Lansdowre's spec-ch spec-ch spec-ch spec-ch spec-ch we nota nota with pleasure the rapid strides the world lf lf making in the direction of of universal universal universal peace. peace. peace. peace. Since Since Since wa wa paraded our navy cleared for for action action three different rations have made us friendly offers offers of of treaties of of ar bitration. bitration. bitration. bitration. PREP. PREP. PREP. PREP. SCHOOLS SCHOOLS ENTER. ENTER. ENTER. St. St. John's John's Georgetown and Drexel Institute -Boys -Boys -Boys at High High School Meet Meet St St John's John's College College the Georgetown Preparatory School and the Drexel In stitute stitute of of Philadelphia Philadelphia are the the latest additions to the list of schools which will be represented in the fnterscholastlo fnterscholastlo track and field games to be held in Convention Hall on January 28. 28. Manager W. W. H. H. Foley yesterday received definite assurances from all of of these Institutions that they will each have have a a strong string string of of entries in in the open open events and It is is is probable that the Georgetown school and Drexel Institute will also also have have relay teams teams competing. competing. These entries entries will will be In tho tho events for preparatory schools and will add to the programme programme programme a number number of competitors who have never before been' been' seen seen -in -in -in scholastic scholastic scholastic games in this this this city. city. It will be St. St. John's John's John's John's first attempt at participation in track and field games games and tho tho performances performances performances of of the boys from from this this school school will he he watched with Interest. Interest. Manager Fabian Fabian has already issued a call for candidate candidate forthe forthe team team and a score score score of boys have have begun training on the indoor track at Georgetown. Georgetown. Georgetown. Georgetown. It is is is probable that the- the- St. St. John's John's boys boys will be In all all the "prep" "prep" school school school events and from the the present outlook they will te te especially especially strong In sprinters and long distance runners Baltimore CUy CUy College has challenged the Georgetown Preps Preps to run a relay race but no definite answer has yet been given by the West West Washington students. students. It is thought likely however that the challenge will be accepted accepted and a close and exciting race should result. result. Manager Foley has been informed that the full strength of the Georgetown team will be represented In the open events events events and an an all of last year's year's star athletes are again in school and eligible it is thought likely that West Washington will catry off its full full share of of the medals. medals. Drexel Institute -was -was famous famous in scholastic athletic circles three three years ago. ago. from the fact fact that that Albert Nash the full-blooded full-blooded full-blooded Sioux Sioux Indian half mile and mile-run mile-run mile-run champion was a member of her track team. team. The Institute team is said to be very well balanced this year and Capt. Capt. Callahan Informed Manager Foley yesterday that he expects to send down men to compete in the sprint and hurdle race the mile run and the shot put and that if a a a suitable race can be arranged he will also send a a relay team. team. There are now an average of of twenty twenty candidates for each of of the local local local local local high high school school teams doing light light training for the games. games. Interest is esBeclally esBeclally strong among the first-year first-year first-year boys and each of the five schools will have a team in the relay race for this class as well well as entries in in the special 50-yard 50-yard 50-yard 50-yard 50-yard dash. dash. HARVARD WON CHESS MATCH Princeton Was Second In the Intercollegiate Tournament. Tournament. Crimson Has Won Eight of the Thirteen Contests Yale First in Only One of the Events. Events. New York Dec. Dec. 24 The third and llnal llnal lound lound of the Intercollegiate chess chess tournament between Columbia Columbia Harvard Harvard Yale and Princeton was concluded to-night to-night to-night to-night to-night and Harvard Harvard Harvard won with a total total ot ot 81-2 81-2 81-2 points as against 6 for for Princeton which finished in .second .second .second place. place. Columbia was third with G1-2 G1-2 G1-2 points points as against 4 for Yale. Yale. Today's games resulted as follows Tucker beat Brldgman Brldgman after 61 moves Tolln Tolln beat Howland after after 53 53 53 53 moves McClure beat Wolff after 57 57 moves Brackett beat Lazlnsk Lazlnsk after 57 57 moves Woodbury beat Nelson Nelson after 28 28 moves Mowry beat Klmball Klmball after 40 moves Ward beat Jameson after 38 moves moves and Owen and Williams drew after after 47 moves moves The final scores of the colleges and play play ers were Thirteen tournaments have been held in which the same colleges colleges took part. part. The hlg-hest hlg-hest hlg-hest hlg-hest scores by by by a winning team were made by Harvard in 1896 1896 1897 and 1898 with ten points in each contest. contest. In the thirteen years Harvard has won eight contests contests Columbia four four and Yale one. one. At a luncheon tendered the sixteen competitors by the originator of of the tournament Edward A. A. Caswell Yale Yale 66. 66. at the Yale Club to-day to-day to-day to-day to-day steps were taken toward the resumption of the international cable matches with Oxford Oxford and Cambridge Cambridge and and a committee was appointed to enter at once Into communication with the English universities universities and to Issue a challenge for the the the the Rice Shield now on the other side as soon as there is as as surance that arrangements can be carried out out Five cable matches have been contested to date date and of of these England won three and America one while one contest resulted In a tie. tie. BALL TEAM ORGANIZED. ORGANIZED. St. St. Stephen's Stephen's Episcopal Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school Club Planning for Next Season. Season. The athletic association of of St. St. Stephen's Stephen's Stephen's Episcooal Episcooal Episcooal Church Columbia Heights held an enthusiastic meeting in the parish hall Thursday evening last. last. Announcement was made that after after March March 1 the old parish hall would be available for a gymnasium The baseball team for next year year year organized -with -with the election of Mr. Mr. B. B. B. B. T. T. Hajden Hajden Hajden as rnartager rnartager and Mr. Mr. Ralph Earnest as as captain captain captain It was decided to adopt the following following Uniform Uniform subject subject to the approval of tfla tfla tfla Board of managers of of the Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school Sunday-school athletic association White shirt shirt with maroon monogram monogram on pocket white trousers trousers white Boston caps with maroon peak peak and maroon stockings stockings and coats coats Several well-known well-known well-known amateurs amateurs Joined the association and will play on the baseball team team which will be chosen from from among the following B. B. T. T. Hayden Hayden Hayden Ralph Earnest Earnest E. E. W. W. Thomas Richard L Conner Conner Fritz Xander Angus McDonald W. W. D. D. Lynham Jr. Jr. Edward Edwalds Albert Burroughs Burroughs J. J. T. T. McKnight George Fulcher Fulcher J. J. A. A. Lefflngwell Lefflngwell George Lang-ford Lang-ford Lang-ford Lang-ford Larry Rlcker Rlcker Rlcker .G. .G. J. J. Tucker Tucker Fred B. B. Miller George Draeger Frederick Duffy and G. G. H. H. Harriss. Harriss. Several Several Several social entertainments have been planned for for the winter the first being being a dance at the Post-office Post-office Post-office Hall on Park street street Januarv Januarv 6. 6. The joung joung men's men's class has begun its sessions on Sunday mornings and is very well attended by the the members of of the association. association. "Tenting "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground. Ground. From Leslie's Leslie's Leslie's Leslie's Weekly. Weekly. Weekly. Weekly. Walter Walter Walter Klttrldge. Klttrldge. Klttrldge. author of of the famous famous sone. sone. sone. sone. sone. sone. "Tenting "Tenting "Tenting "Tenting on tbe tbe Old Camp Ground Is Is Is still Hying In the hamlet ot ot Reed's Reed's Reed's Reed's Ferry Ferry N. N. H. H. H. H. Even at his his advanced age age he tikes tikes pleasure In composing composing musical musical musical pieces. pieces. pieces. pieces. Klttrlde Klttrlde first wrote wrote the words words ot ot the the the song song song that made made made him him tamons tamons tamons tamons tamons then then picked picked picked picked out the air upon the strings ot ot his his -rlolln -rlolln -rlolln and and playej playej playej tbe tbe tune first first on an old melodeon. melodeon. melodeon. melodeon. Though the song song was was written written forty years ago ago ago he ha both Instruments In In his his his possession. possession. Cures Colds and At Drugilsti Drugilsti Drugilsti 3 ccntl. ccntl. ccntl. ccntl. or xulUd. xulUd. xulUd. xulUd. Humphrey Humphrey Humphrey Humphrey Medlcln Medlcln Medlcln Co. Co. cor. cor. WUlUm WUlUm an4 an4 John tr ti. ti. Xtw Xtw York. York. York. ON GRIDIRON IN IN SOUTH Representative Eleven Picked from Stars of 1904. 1904. 1904. 1904. 1904. VANDEEBttT VANDEEBttT VANDEEBttT FOBEMOST FOBEMOST TEAM TEAM Georgetown Virginia and and North Carolina Not Figured' Figured' Figured' Figured' la la the Selection Became Became Became They Are Not Affiliated with the Southern Intercollegiate Intercollegiate Intercollegiate Athletic At- At- At- At- At- At- iflcUtion Northern Coaches in South. South. Edwin Edwin Ctmp Ctmp Ctmp In Illuftrttii Illuftrttii Illuftrttii Sporting Ntwi. Ntwi. Ntwi. Chronologically Chronologically Southern football I some some ten or twelve years behind behind the same same same Jn Jn the East. East. In In playing ability the best best Southern team of of this this yar yar yar yar is is five or perhaps six touch-downs touch-downs touch-downs touch-downs touch-downs behind the best eleven of of the the East. East. But there are at least twenty twenty twenty players In In the South this jear jear jear who could win a place on on any of of the strongest elevens. elevens. East or West. West. The first statement Is a fact fact that can be proved by records. records. There Is no way of demonstrating the truth of of either of the others. others. They are merely opinions opinions which may be taken on the judgment of critics who who who know Eastern football and who know Southern football. football. It Is well at the start to define "South "South "South ern ern ern football. football. football. as used in this article. article. Only Only the teams in the Southern Southern Southern Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association are considered. considered. Georgetown and Virginia and North Carolina are Southern colleges by reason of geographical location but not otherwise. otherwise. They no longer'play longer'play games games with association elevens and confine their activity to contests among themselves and with smaller institutions In their own immediate provinces. provinces. The severance of of relations with teams. teams. In the association is largely due to the the strict and strictly enforced eligibility rules that obtain in this organization. organization. For For instance this year year year the University of North Carolina was scheduled to play Vanderbllt Vanderbllt University whose team was the strongest in the association. association. On the North Carolina eleven were three play play ers Carpenter Bear and Sltton who under the S. S. I. I. A. A. A rules rules are Ineligible. Ineligible. Nor Nor can an S. S. S. S. I. I. A. A. A. A. team play a game against these men. men. The North Carolina management was notified that the trio could not be used used against Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Carolina declined to play without them them and the game was canceled. canceled. All three men are splendid players but Carpenter ahd ahd Bear Bear members last year of the strong Virginia Polytechnic eleven and Sltton. Sltton. Sltton. Sltton. one of of of of the mainstays of of the Clemson team of of 1903 1903 had suddenly suddenly and with with with a re markable markable unanimity decided this fall fall to continue continue their studies at North Carolina where the formality of of a "one "one year residence rule" rule" Is regarded as an Inconvenient fetish of the farther farther South South Georgetown and North Carolina. Carolina. And so it Is at Virginia Virginia where they jmt jmt out out strong teams vide th th th tie with the the Carlisle Indians last year year and the victory victory over over over the same same eleven eleven in 3902) 3902) 3902) 3902) but but teams teams whose whose jjinlnstuyi jjinlnstuyi jjinlnstuyi are recruited recruited recruited recruited ftom ftom ftom ftom other colle i North or South. South. As to Georgetown tli.it tli.it tli.it Institution can hardly claim to be Southern. Southern. Its student body body Is representatively Eastern and its teams teams play no Southern colleges except North Carolina. Carolina. It is chiefly thrpu-gh thrpu-gh thrpu-gh thrpu-gh thrpu-gh thrpu-gh the work of thes thes three universities that Southern football Is known to to the East hence the writer makes an effort to distinguish between Ihem Ihem Ihem and the Southern teams proper. proper. Those Institutions are certainly much stronger than all save save the very topmost topmost In the Southern Intercollegiate Association but they no. no. more more represent the South than does Michigan Michigan represent the Pacific Coast. Coast. The Vanderbllt Vanderbllt University eleven was the strongest In the S. S. I. I. A. A. A. A. this year. year. The eleven was the best In point point of of physique ever put out In the South averaging as it did a good 178 pounds In weight. weight. It was was composed of eight veterans and three freshmen who had attained experience and help on prep teams. teams. The coaching was efficiently done done by Dan McGugln McGugln a Michigan product product who was assistant to Yost a.1 a.1 a.1 that university last year. year. He came to Vanderbllt Vanderbllt last fall and found found eleven men who were of of a a size and knew tho tho groundwork of of the game. game. Accordingly he set to work on on the "machine" "machine" idea of of which we have heard heard so much and the record of of the season demonstrates his suc suc cess. cess. The eleven went through the campaign without defeat defeat piling up scores of of enormous proportions against the the weaker teams and walloping the stronger stronger elevens In sound fashion. fashion. fashion. fashion. The season was brought to a close Thanksgiving Day with a 27-too defeat defeat administered to Vandy's Vandy's dearest foe the University of of the South commonly known as Sewanee. Sewanee. Vanderbllt Vanderbllt scored 454 points In eight games against a total of of 4 4 for for its jopponents. jopponents. jopponents. jopponents. The goal line line Wa s not crossed but but the Missouri School of of Mines got close enough on a fumbled fumbled punt to make a placement kick from the 20-vard 20-vard 20-vard 20-vard 20-vard line. line. Considerably below Vanderbllt Vanderbllt in strength was the Alabama Polytechnic Institute always called Auburn. Auburn. The Alabamlana Alabamlana were splendidly coached by "Mike" "Mike" Donahue a Yale scrub Quarter who in one year better adjusted himself .to .to Southern conditions than many an Eastern 'varsity 'varsity star. star. Donahue's Donahue's team team despite its lack of weight played real football and and went through an entirely victorious season defeating Florida Florida Clemson Nashville Georgia Tech University of Alabama and Georgia. Georgia. Sewanee at times showed glimpses of power power but was no match for Vanderbilt in the final game of the year. year. Georgia Tech's Tech's Advancement. Advancement. The real feature of the season was the marvelous advance made by tho tho Georgia School of Technology which burst from from from ittters ittters that kept it in the lowest class for ten ears to a prominent position among this season's season's elevens elevens of the second class. class. It Is interesting to to note that this year's year's Tech eleven is the first winning aggregation the school has had since 1S34. 1S34. 1S34. when Major General Wood played right guard and smashed and hammered his way for many a touch-down touch-down touch-down for tha old Gold and White. White. One regrets to say Doctor Wood as he was called then was not exactly a bona fide fide student but he played a brilliant game nevertheless for his his foster alma mater. mater. The dash and daring- he later showed in hiking up San Juan hill were no more thrilling than his plunges through Georgia's Georgia's ana ana Auburn's Auburn's lines that year nor could his statesmanship as governor general general of Cuba have been more thoroughly thoroughly effective and beneficial than his stragety with the Tech team. team. At that time General Wood was post physician at Fort McPheraon. McPheraon. McPheraon. a few miles from Atlanta. Atlanta. On this season's season's form the teams of the Southern Intercollegiate Association ranked ae ae follows Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. AUbima AUbima Auburn. Auburn. TuUn TuUn TuUn Sewanee Tenneiui Tenneiui Georgia Teen. Teen. Teen. Teen. Georfla Georfla Clenuon. Clenuon. Clenuon. Mlululppt. Mlululppt. Mlululppt. Cumberland Cumberland Kaahrllle. Kaahrllle. Kaahrllle. Kaahrllle. The most interesting feature of South South ern football to the Easterner is the fact that it is spectular. spectular. spectular. spectular. Defensive play has not been so developed that an end run is hopeless hopeless or that a double double pass pass is a stralegem stralegem stralegem of the last resort. resort. resort. resort. Nor is the game a tiresome repetition of of line smashes ekrlng ekrlng out a bare first down fn three trials. trials. The unexpected xesn't xesn't xesn't xesn't happen very often when Yale andHar andHar vard vard play but it is all that that does occur when your Southern teams tntr tntr it up. up. A Bhevlln Bhevlln 6r a Neal would would doubtless smile to observe observe the frequence with which a Southern end is smothered by flying in terference or fooled fooled by the antiquated criss-cross criss-cross criss-cross criss-cross criss-cross criss-cross but he would learn the reason in less than'a than'a morth. morth. morth. The game la la not a matter of business business in the South. South. It is an autumn pastime pure Parker Bridget Co. Co. Extend the Compliments of the Season. Season. The ttore ttore will remain remain cloied eJl eJl dy dy Monday. Monday. Monday. Monday. and simple and is played for the the fun there is In it. it. Victory is not as Joysome. Joysome. nor defeat as bitter as it Is where the game Is a decade older and where It is is the paramount affair in college life where $20,000 $20,000 is a cheap price to pay for the training of a. a. season's season's champion and where a score of alumni desert their busi busi ness duties for a fortnight or a month month to "help "help out the team. team. Football Is not not taken so seriously down South and never will be. be. Consequently the best team in Dixie will never be a match for Yale Yale Harvard Princeton or Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania. There are other reasons for the comparative inferiority inferiority of Southern football. football. One is that the student bodies are small. small. The average enrollment Is hardly more than 400 400 and it is not always easy to get proper material from such a small number. Then the average age of of the graduating class is twenty years equivalent to the sophomore class of the large East East ern ern institution. institution. Not to be disregarded is the handicap of climate. climate. With the mercury hovering around 80 80 in the middle of October It la la not easy to get benefit from from hard practice. practice. Another handicap is the lack of competent coaching. coaching. Blessed Is that Institution which has a good head coach for. for. there are no assistants. assistants. He who has charge of a team not only teaches ele mentary mentary football to the linemen and backs but plans his his system teaches It wheedles and bulldozes the faculty into concessions and when he has a few spare moments looks out for the physical condition of his men. men. Athletic associations are not wealthy In the South. South. Northern Coaches in South. South. There have been coaches andi coaches In the South. South. Every style of football has been taught some teams have played two or three etylae etylae and some non non at alL alL This year's year's teams represented many many systems. systems. Vanderbllt Vanderbllt was It-di It-di It-di It-di to supremacy by McGugin of Michigan Auburn was taught by Donahue of Yale Sewanee was in- in- utrbcted utrbcted utrbcted by Whitney Whitney Whitney of Coinell Coinell Georgia Tech waa waa raided raided upward by Heisman of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 8J. 8J. 8J. 8J. the rtoj en i/f i/f i/f i/f th m ull ull and the the moat moat successful successful Berr of of Blown Blown Blown couched couched couched tho tho Tulane Nushvllle Nushvllle WHS WHS handled by Fisher tha tha old Pilnceton Pilnceton center Cumberland Cumberland Cumberland learned thlugs thlugs from Phillips Phillips Phillips of Washington and Jefferson and Ten Ten nessee and Clemson had alumni in struction. struction. The season just brought to a close showed a marked Improvement In. In. the plays of every team with the exception of Clemson and and possibly Cumberland. Cumberland. That eleven Which Which Which did not not Improve considerably over 1903 form found itself relegated a few notches to the rear because the others had advanced advanced The teams were heavier and. and. knew more football played more consistently consistently and snoweoj snoweoj better spirit. spirit. The advance was not due BO much to the Increase of skill ort ort the part of the players as to the im provement in team work. work. But But there were a score of men who stood out above the others making the choice of an "All- "All- "All- Southern" Southern" comparatively easy. easy. A team composed of the following men would would given proper coaching coaching make a formidable rival to any eleven East or Middle West Center Stone Stone of Vanderbtlt. Vanderbtlt. Vanderbtlt. Right guard Pbllllpa Pbllllpa Pbllllpa of Sewanee. Sewanee. Sewanee. Sewanee. Left guard. guard. Brown of Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Right tackle. tackle. Derrick of of Ciemton. Ciemton. Ciemton. Ciemton. Left tackle. tackle. Brown Brown Brown of Georgia. Georgia. Tech Tech Right end. end. Beene Beene ot ot Tennel&ee. Tennel&ee. Tennel&ee. Tennel&ee. Left end Hamilton Hamilton of Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Vanderbllt. Quarter Scarborough of Senanee. Senanee. Senanee. Senanee. Right half. half. CralS. CralS. CralS. of Vandeiollt. Vandeiollt. Vandeiollt. Vandeiollt. Left Left Left half Steel Steel of Cumberland. Cumberland. Fullback Fojr Fojr ot ot Auburn. Auburn. Merits of the Picked Team. Team. From tackle to tackle this combination would weigh 183 183 pounds the ends average 165 pounds and the backs average a flat 170 team weight 177 177 177 pounds. pounds. The elevens would to a happy degree combine a strong defense with a powerful attack. attack. Craig Steele and Foy would make a back field trio of unusual speed and Impact while while Scarborough is a heady general not only tho tho best punter in the South but one of the best in the country and a sure tackier. tackier. tackier. tackier. Beene and Hamilton are a wary pair of ends hard to fool hard to box fast in getting down on kicks and veterans veterans in experience. experience. Derrick has been the mainstay of tho tho Clemson team this year and is a tackle of rare ability being not only a tower of strength on the de fensive but a man who has seldom been stopped without a gain when when used to carry the ball. ball. Brown at the other tackle Is lighter weighing only 178 but is a. a. difficult man to gain through. through. He carries carries the ball well and is in addition a punter of ability. ability. For four years Phillips has been placed on every "all "all Southern" Southern" chosen and his work has shown no de terioration this season. season. Six feet three inches tall weighing 190. 190. and as haid haid as nails he Is known as the "Glass "Glass of the South. South. His line plunging and hurdling- hurdling- hurdling- make him. him. the best ground-gainer ground-gainer ground-gainer of this season as well as previous years. years. "Bull" "Bull" Brown Brown at the the other guard is steady and siolid siolid not a brilliant man but one who can play guard as well as anybody. anybody. Stone is a freshman but leaped into fame fame in one season. season. The physical counterpart of of Phillips Phillips he has proved himself to be a player of the first class. class. Among the Linemen. Linemen. Among the linemen worthy of mention are Capt. Capt. Smith of Cumberland Moon and Braswell Braswell of Auburn "Eph" "Eph" Klrby- Klrby- Klrby- Klrby- Smlth. Smlth. Smlth. of Sewanee Sewanee the last last of a long line of Indomitable Indomitable wearers of the purple Capt Capt Word Word of Tennessee Elgin of of Nash- Nash- vllle. vllle. vllle. and Rosslter Rosslter of Georgia. Georgia. Kyle of CHILBLAINS CHILBLAINS and all FOOT AILMENTS Scientifically Treated. Treated. WARTS PERMANENTLY CURED. CURED. J. J. J. J. J. Georges Son 1211 Penna. Penna. Aye. Aye. Aye. Aye. N. N. W. W. Manicuring. Manicuring. Last Call for the Athletic Gifts. Gifts. Footballs $1.00 $1.00 $1.00 Punching Punching Bags. Bags. J1.23 J1.23 Ire Ire Skates Skates SOc. SOc. Roller Skates..JLOO Skates..JLOO Skates..JLOO Skates..JLOO Skates..JLOO Boxing Gloves.tl.23 Gloves.tl.23 Gloves.tl.23 Gloves.tl.23 Gloves.tl.23 Shaker Knit Sweaters.J3 Sweaters.J3 Sweaters.J3 Sweaters.J3 Sweaters.J3 50 up M. M. A. A. Tappan Co. Co. 1339 1339 F Street. Street. Vandcrbllt Vandcrbllt is the only first-class first-class first-class Quarter other other than Scarborough but there is a wealth of strong- strong- half backs and full backs. backs. Blake of Vanderbllt Vanderbllt Burks of Alabama Capt. Capt. Oliver of South Caro Caro Caro Una Una Capt. Capt. Holland of Clemson Capt. Capt. i Reynolds of Auburn and W. W. Wilson of Tech have done splendid work this year. year. In the ethics of amateur sport tha tha Southern Intercollegiate Association has Improved wonderfully during the past few- few- few- years. years. President Dudley of Vanderbllt Vanderbllt University has worked faithfully faithfully for tha tha sake of amateur sport and the "ringers" "ringers" and professionalism of a few years ago are no more a source of congratulation for lovers of straightforward athletics. athletics. MICHAEL DIED POOR. POOR. Famous Cyclist Won Fortunes on Track but Saved Nothing. Nothing. The SUuiliMi SUuiliMi dculh dculh of of of Jimmy Jimmy Michael ien.o\os ien.o\os ien.o\os ien.o\os ien.o\os Hum Hum Hum tho uthMta uthMta woild woild in geneial geneial and tho tho tho exile wuild wuild wuild In particular on j of tiit tiit must must interesting characters In In the modern world of auorts. auorts. auorts. Standing about 4 fnt fnt 11 11 inches. inches. Michael was nevertheless nevertheless without a peer when when in in condition at his ipetlalty ipetlalty wr.lch wr.lch wr.lch was .one-distance .one-distance .one-distance .one-distance .one-distance c- c- cle riding- riding- riding- None of the' the' c clists who from from time to time disputed his title to championship honor honor honor and and and tried to prove their contention succeeded when the diminutive pace follower was in any kind of shape. shape. The "Welsh "Welsh Rarebit. Rarebit. although although only only twenty-seven twenty-seven twenty-seven years of age was said to have cleared over $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 at the racing game but he quit life as most of that class of men do. do. practically pennijess. pennijess. Born in Wales In 1S77 1S77 of poor parentage Michael turned to the trade of butcher and was an errand boy for the- the- biggest meat establishment in his home town. town. While working in that capacity he- he- saved enough to buy a wheel and almost from the start while competing in amateur events he showed that stamina and speed which afterward made him world famous. famous. He competed In London as an amateur for the last time in a 100-mile 100-mile 100-mile race and had no no trouble in proving himself the best amateur in England. England. The contest was witnessed by Warburton. the famous English trainer who saw a chance of making money by taking- taking- taking- tha tha boy under his wing. wing. After proving himself as good as any rider in Great Britain Germany and France Michael was Drought Drought over to tnis tnis country just at at the time when cycle racing was at fever heat and one of the most popular pastimes. pastimes. Tom Eck who has handled more successful cyclists than any other man man in this country had Michael sign a contract with him no sooner than he had set foot oa oa these shores and Eck made a small fortune with the midget. midget. Coming into money so quickly and earning It so easily Michael soon lost all Idea of .the .the value of It and spent It very freely. freely. freely. freely. Tom Eck had his own troubles in keeping Jimmy at the training table and declared only a short time ago that unless Michael was broko broko he never trained. trained. He proved however that long preparation was not necessary for him to acquire speed and he would often appear on the track for a grueling contest after being out half the night. night. For a time Michael deserted the cycle track and tried to become a horse ocke He trained in Phil Pwyer's Pwyer's stable at Gravesend and had some mounts at New New Orleans but won very few races. races. Ha Ha tried again later on in France but could could never make any headway as a Jockey and finally gave it up as a hopeless tack. tack. tack. tack. He went back to paced racing and un der the skillful handling of Eck Eck developed much of his former speed but was never quite quite the world beater that ha ha had been before his Ill-advised Ill-advised Ill-advised sortl sortl into horse racing. racing. When Michael followed pace he always carried a quill toothpick In his inouth inouth inouth through which he breathed. breathed. Often after a hard ride he would dismount with but an inch or so of the toothpick he having chewed It in bis bis excitement. excitement. In his training in the days of human pacing he had a habit of starting out behind a tandem team and dropping back ten feet from tlio tlio machine. machine. Then he would ride unpacej. unpacej. unpacej. for five miles or so and generally beat the tandem out in the finishing sprint. sprint. He had the easiest position position back of a pacemaker either human or motor-driv motor-driv motor-driv motor-driv motor-driv motor-driv en of any of the pace followers. followers. He used flat flat handle bars and sat up almost straight which his smallness nllowea nllowea nllowea him to do without losing benefit of the pacemaker. pacemaker. I Grey I RYE and BOURBON WHISKEY The Best Oldest and Purest Whiskey ever Sold at the price price $1 $1 Monastery Monastery Monastery Beer Case of 24 24 bottles. bottles. Per Per Per Bot. Bot. Bot. Bot. 25 -SOLD -SOLD ONLY BY- BY- LOUIS LOUIS BUSH 1305 E St. St. NW. NW. 'Phone 'Phone Main 2657. 2657. Richly Appointed Appointed Cafe on Second Second Floor for Ladle Ladle and Gentlemen. Gentlemen. if- if- --/4 --/4 r" r" f f tJ WASm J 1 S NDA DEQEl\JlEn DEQEl\JlEn DEQEl\JlEn 5 9r t I S E ATR FRA"K FRA"K HUN destned a caeer .chlnglng .chlnglng Icenes. Icenes. 193' 193' e Ith Ith cubs In'two In'two leages 'ear 'ear 'ear 'ear a dI- dI- teas Amercan L age nndne.tseaon nndne.tseaon pre nt wanderlnl Itret ba hm wt alhouJh h aln.lnthe aln.lnthe AmNlcU Lele Walhnlton relrve outfelder 'at 'at her Wa antci- antci- laon tht. tht. 8 trjde I 1010 echanJe .thr. .thr. rmor hm MUwaukee ABoclaton Iood" Iood" lat 'ear 'ear abfty majorle ues Is' Is' meaure clrc\mstances clrc\mstances clrc\mstances surprlslnJ th t c \ldnot \ldnot reac d Ing Chcago and'St. and'St. Luis Huelsma V.ashlngon V.ashlngon wa glen .glar .glar plae outfeld. outfeld. tme bal o tt plce of hs awhie. awhie. I remains wi ony cn bal .or' .or' clumy' clumy' Ifi feld Ipeedy 'telow 'telow lat 'Ipectiular. 'Ipectiular. frst-class frst-class frst-class flder Jave waitng ball I returs Washingon wU t wih haf wi a tEam. tEam. attibuted wea battng lst slf d- d- ad the' the' .confdence .confdence tel a a'nlntervcw a'nlntervcw LuIs Leage 19. 19. accrding plpers Cantlon's Cantlon's m- m- 19. 19. hve tce my traster sociaton. sociaton. wi remai Wahington .1 .1 mInor next.prlng. next.prlng. .1 .1 exp ted 14 Snator setted. setted. assigment gessing -he -he da afected work reaUze'tht reaUze'tht ar confdent m'sel m'sel tce. tce. th t 'I 'I ca .3 .3 excuses' excuses' 1 a cub beleve Il I Fne felding kis bae his an grounds'that grounds'that leage -.tured -.tured Americn Lage Infelders outfelders kiing ha .ound .ound crcuit outfelders l.s l.s batng peculariies hmi frst ful dif- dif- cultes. cultes. 'An 'An nEW dr ftng sug ested b rjected Leage In- In- meetnl I I llonal Lague wih ton leag es wi benefted 'by 'by rent rulethe be In compeled fol later unlmfe drafs. drafs. tnder b an unlmlt d cubs b low mentpne. mentpne. ir 1money In' In' stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt stalmcnts-one-halt tme fnal th folowln feason-une feason-une feason-une tme lmi-un lmi-un lmi-un i that. that. draftng mone I fal Ia 1. 1. this' this' wi rnanclal leages drfing fgures 'e.r. 'e.r. frt pa'm pa'm pa'm nt" nt" cubi drfed tal 19 noo. noo. jeefed fnal pa 'ments 'ments amolm lng onlyt.W. onlyt.W. al. al. pla 'ers 'ers $15,0. $15,0. $15,0. rle. rle. bCn 'belgadvocated. 'belgadvocated. leaguti 'o1ld 'o1ld ani .0 .0 dratng player $6.0 $6.0 $6.0 existng rles. rles. S tar. tar. this /year /year $17,0 $17,0 frst rle les drfed p. p. aC pted 1. 1. Te rle a excelent themior tht I 610w depleton th tormely extremel basebal cn ltte fel ws. ws. be. be. be. jor 'leagues 'leagues pace "aarles "aarles pOiilble 13 Is Impratve seon. seon. cubs cnnot sand tey carled years profts frst hal ofset s ond whtn chnces rispec able leage cub Jhc wa OO qui wih .on .on .eag\ehad .eag\ehad .eag\ehad fve unti I sawn Natonal Lage 'as 'as tor'months tor'months tor'months tor'months 'as 'as feced Grunds sries. sries. majot 'eaues 'eaues s practcalY th. th. scond tall proft Wih 14 games ,0 ,0 $6.0 hal l ge w1 escpe d fclt sa- sa- busness condition. condition. 's 's 's averge b-bl b-bl b-bl fa ha 10Ucd ever seaon ther les tht basbl quittng Quittng hs Jresent ke becomln& becomln& a magat. magat. or manager 8me mnor. mnor. leage era hs ben larger re's U same.ot'one same.ot'one wl qut gme voluntarly the' the' player cnsquenc who' who' hve 'dofed 'dofed ow volton ad D1. D1. Lnge geat outfeldet ws. ws. steadty 'reflsed 'reflsed c e. e. bk gme Jo Corbet gme wa tnaly brk onc Infelder. Infelder. sti a mor yeas th dlamond abandned sprt lawat whl h sucoss Pnd. Pnd. Btlmore bsebl Plppine any suron whie Hustng Athletcs base al str lef gme 'whle 'whle stl prhnt wa' wa' wis tormer t r tn Jonal ike m r Brklyn outfelder qui rtrement walbecause wa Luis nd rot rceive a prto purcho rlce. rlce. wa worh ,0 ,0 I consequenty worr. worr. Thtre mny. mny. Te tst loet seasn'l seasn'l ltr W I &ln& &ln& to. to. bl leole wa Kins Chlc& Chlc& Natonals rmor manIO Knla Cty Jeom Jeom Sole beaan Wrry Inoly RUna slied Chlcaao mal a r naturtly Wil renderd etrmely Kina abot bet bckltop tht lealue Gnnl cGulre tm bseman re. re. re. re. lectvely Hlrhlander Ilat. Ilat. mnace Leage. Leage. Tis n\'g n\'g n\'g n\'g i toated aund weEks prpsed de fel frst 'wal 'wal 190 Sprln tld fel anoter m ager bln& bln& tht "Cc" "Cc" Fser g. g. Ina tea credied 1.0 1.0 Fasr trded Phliadtlphla I lkelY tht hs rpr a- a- nounce a Qui con Quence bcause salar wa McGnnity leadng picher respectve leages. leages. Te b to eiher tle game-untl game-untl game-untl sl- sl- ar dead Amercn Lage cerarly 1ave cal Wen coleg's coleg's selectng basebl Biy lush felder whie Di .Vahlng- .Vahlng- wl Pnceton. Pnceton. Chesbr ad Wiie K eler Inders wi McAlster Detrit pler w1 afer 1chlgan Snators' Snators' frst bsema wl colege Ih101s Jigg Dnahue "il "il otler Wel tern clege suad. suad. 'Hary 'Hary Cmbr- Cmbr- Ben capaiger. capaiger. wa membr Valey Lage. Lage. fled I cme natona Tte sl Natona Leage. Leage. shal ne.er ne.er batte gae wih J J Chabrsburg. Chabrsburg. I ed 1 1 Chabrsburg wa gme. gme. I Ve 'lyed 'lyed fnished our hat gme Tristate'last Tristate'last us. us. 'hln" 'hln" picher Chabers burg frst Costelo feld Chambes burg. burg. I I feld i 1 rot Natonal Lague felder. felder. bt waloped frst head mie awa ceared roled toul caled bl Chambrsburg t ok ge. ge. hov'ever hov'ever dissatsfed decsion tC tona Lege. Lege. bal hi I gound' gound' teirtorylt I regrdless Is fenc 'Tht 'Tht decison Carlsle da Chale Pitinger Ca- Ca- bersburl tie. tie. Leage mQgl. mQgl. .Ipcluding .Ipcluding Stalngs Bufal den s-or s-or s-or reprted' reprted' efect te $0.0 $0.0 $0.0 seson. seson. an tken the Caaian ciy Va Stallng ownes tht mtreal wi ear. ear. mnr lnes' lnes' Bi fr&t fr&t ba whie b AssocIaton battng t sUl basebal reserve seaon. seaon. rlnor leage unwae tact negotated direty an Igored communicatons mange- mange- rent f cub alr cub's cub's hl leae. leae. wi Aclalon te m. m. al stl beief ofcials. ofcials. 'a 'a switche. switche. Natonal Lagut varce ha ben papr. papr. lte I 'as 'as later pat 101. 101. York \Vashlngon \Vashlngon Leage pla 'lng 'lng 'the 'the own-J own-J own-J Potal approache hlm'there hlm'there tht dy you lke pIa Amercan Lage Slb2ch repled. repled. naturaly 'Vhat's 'Vhat's 'Vhat's 'Vhat's In i Potal wih. wih. 'our 'our thln gettng f f ,40 ,40 ,3for ,3for two-year two-year two-year I POSal Nev' Nev' ad Th were 'rained. 'rained. to. to. Afer Eesn came Colns ofering ,0. ,0. ,0. wrote Baltmoresay- Baltmoresay- lke Kele gpok.n gpok.n a oth r outtelders lcGra w sid wante god pla wih la queston al' al' meetng Nel Hou-e Hou-e Hou-e slme t.2. t.2. t.2. prt I Natonals lO a I. I. neglectn efect .ta .ta opning th dor consmpton death eas II. II. cerain .reult .reult fataly cath Oe Is danrs UtS exsen oten unsspect- unsspect- unti beomes chronicthat lnger- lnger- In waitng It- It- slt tastenln& tastenln& catrh you- you- you- you- dnerous disa whch humanty. humanty. AG.S AG.S PWDE Wi you dsease ta or deply r- r- I. I. I. equaly etaln. etaln. I .I"es .I"es 0 minuteit efects pr- pr- Incredbly tme headche. headche. and detnes al prompty It wonderfl curatve artes garanteed Afeck's Afeck's Dstt Pa Ae g'alo g'alo g Pn whi 1 -srbah -srbah rts. rts. Tt yarwnen t We te Columbs bowlng tem' tem' Deceb sge wih Tom Lttus a. a. Wa Ion on.a on.a two-yea two-yea two-yea cntrc at $0 $0 ear. ear. Te contact wa draw Dubuque law Loftus CANNO MBATERS. MBATERS. Faut Crrected" Crrected" I Git Fm .th. .th. Tribun. Tribun. I urous balplayer'C balplayer'C maser anythln. anythln. the a de ecept batIng. batIng. 10 natura-ablty natura-ablty natura-ablty len po tem h deVtN hmal 'no 'no len t unle a ni tural bater beglnne'l beglnne'l bnttnl on Improv correotnl certan tault veteri' veteri' cn kHP kHP OOMtat practce advic Ichol- Ichol- In pratce cn mle a .8 .8 hIter a natural .2 .2 bltter. bltter. I Ion& Ion& 8'0 8'0 Ireat Dlcher I 1 common common stnl"r' stnl"r' Culd a goo slary 1 mlna r pich there a plentful picher tal-end tal-end tal-end th leagues'Vashlngton leagues'Vashlngton ad Phladelpha- Phladelpha- frst-clas frst-clas frst-clas piching materal stars hs lEage.s. lEage.s. year easlest thing i goo'.tcher goo'.tcher frst bema wel wa cnsderd tall outfelder. outfelder. ctcher ad frst ba outfelder smething fall bter catch Te catchrs mot cn fnger prnounce wekness .uke" .uke" Farel Guir cn tatest teas prt player ben tryng psi- psi- tons daage thestok ony scarc1ty g9d tmber geter requirments wih fent scienc basebal. basebal. -ers -ers ag a culd picher' picher' delver ha god stEalng. stEalng. hi aly ctcher's ctcher's sal r. r. Ike Kely frst sceIce positon slnCe ben cntanty rised moden ta mainer tme basebel's basebel's ctcher basebal bak footbal tootbal feld genel ofensIve. ofensIve. bnebal nale Inteld decdedly outeld FIELDNG O'Day O'Day Strie I O'Day O'Day frmly COI- COI- that aboltonof strke rlc battng IQ battng re- re- outfelders wih fre al Infelders bttng strke. strke. admis I wth advace fator te felding. felding. ha greaty. greaty. I Wih outfelders proftng difernty tel ad Infelders eualy hlty. hlty. bter smal lnes stright Infelders' Infelders' outfelders bal be outfelders tl bater 1 hi bal or baters wi lef feld slt feld. feld. justlrverse notced outfeders decdedl dlferent positons batsmEn caried 10 outfelders pslto"s pslto"s bal the' the' de- de- lver jllng a proofol a of wel. wel. Boon tal of tme oppslng felder but happn bl partcular pla 'er 'er his I. I. ae txceptons lke L Infel'ers Infel'ers equaly clO e. e. grund fust bt picher's picher's c ance Infeldirs whih got hlghElthan lne ltle gttng outfeders. outfeders. conclude g1ment wth baters I hitng bal Jearly i hittng hittng. hittng. t SuUvan I Iishman. Iishman. I 'v 'v hen w s lvan f y naf wel I beter t reding YotSuddlbeck. YotSuddlbeck. I e ter Emperor. Emperor. I tme unt dive mE thp jauntng cr ccnversaton drl\e. drl\e. drl\e. rahr. rahr. chpion fghter l' l' 'ure 'ure .t .t tht Englshman. Englshman. Ftzsimmons I herd Ftz 1ls ha ve Maher. Maher. loked I B\rrlse B\rrlse B\rrlse dlsgt. dlsgt. sad here p"te p"te p"te p"te AerIc' AerIc' conversaton piot cr not'make not'make mae hl h a I nigh. nigh. rich wht g-ln' g-ln' g-ln' g-ln' drove Phia- Phia- lat sel por a' a' lte Amer1 PoIsns nccumula'E nccumula'E rcsutte' rcsutte' Bars- Bars- Dar1a Basebal TrlyWD derul. derul. FORGNS .E .E FON I Gret Aercan Spor I Popuar oluu PhUppinu an Arcaolcer in' in' Thei Che Divraon-FUpinol Divraon-FUpinol Divraon-FUpinol Ez- Ez- Ez- Ez- peet 1 Bu'ebal Bu'ebal tono"l tono"l n natona c e Unied ha. ha. ha. spread tar dl.tat dl.tat wthin f'ew'years f'ew'years &rand &rand outdor sprt frmlY eltablshed PhiippIne ads I husk htarty sport-lving sport-lving sport-lving ofcers jaCkles'l United 9 galafUY an bldy t e Star Itrpes. Itrpes. Glor wi found'basebal. found'basebal. I to al blesd wih rel ad progesive. progesive. Japaese I geive an even' even' dsa&trous dsa&trous tme attenton tonal ard d .s .s Io youn Japanee colegian chaleng StaforUnlverty Cal- Cal- fernla a gae btween Stanford Ard mre Calforna Iself and cnfdence I tht Staord w1 def ad wU .t .t one. one. I a contel wU letEr dy te histor wl a snatlmal lfe sprt ad tct thaht thaht al athletc sport. sport. Basebal Arica. Arica. aso fourlshlng Suth lca. lca. Trnsvaal sprt publshes tul Tere Baebal Associaton ad diferent cn bal Italned accurcy aglty felding Trnsvaa Lader ba tsmen fgre ofcial twenty-thre twenty-thre twenty-thre bated 30 tle "Lruppln-g "Lruppln-g "Lruppln-g "Lruppln-g Larr's" Larr's" lke a tng .53. .53. .53. Th. Th. batfr wai aso "andelers "andelers waloped oth.r oth.r tme i lakllg l'l l'l .50 .50 t.u t.u baebal wrlterl 'l' 'l' 'l' ns'aul ns'aul grlsped tle Amtrlcun ltyl" ltyl" r.- r.- vurtng b tl tolowlll I lummtnt 1he i i a lal trfquenty whlskers tle Infelders test Waddel Chesbr spi bal' bal' lable al erratc. erratc. Englsh basebal Brions geat a sportng establshed .I .I of-shoot of-shoot of-shoot ancent "barnba1" "barnba1" Englshmen's Englshmen's Englihmen conservatve abut es'pecaly es'pecaly conidered natonal ard In stanc ltte pohpoohed baseball Brion get fuences bcomes prale felding de\'eJop. de\'eJop. de\'eJop. de\'eJop. Canada.South Canada.South Australa. Australa. hustng. hustng. tme stad quik acton livelness aU-around aU-around aU-around hustng baebal resuI wit colonial mny dys decsion. decsion. strIds mde bal I' I' jut fa9 spreadin localtes. localtes. I ha playd Sandwlch'l Sandwlch'l Sandwlch'l Sandwlch'l wa i untl UnIed gl"en gl"en fourlshed. fourlshed. nine ofcers. ofcers. jackle and visied. visied. I In freuently natve fw ver brothr Sttes Vanala aferward Yandala Te stoppe treuenty 8' 8' bal Invarably It Te natve" natve" te welcomed wit demonstratons holdy wa played. played. Team team tCrtalned fredom cty. cty. 'ears 'ears 1 reglar i al tonaltes cub reputaton pia leaie. leaie. i Phippines I mosty sOl-I sOl-I sOl-I gounds lanla. lanla. II are ttr ted cro".ds cro".ds I. I. numbrs a Fipinos. Fipinos. ad th y I later I shorty. shorty. kow gme 'were 'were Svannah practce solders tlayed an exhibiton wih Fi- Fi- whie. whie. dd te. te. prctced wih surrsing profcency. profcency. Flpino wi al "wel "wel -els" -els" -els" Phippines brw-sknned brw-sknned brw-sknned al fne gme wel lcked 'drkles 'drkles temeriy rot aginst bys. bys. umpird gme t. t. stran e abut e Flpinos beome over the' the' courageus lt- lt- te felow toueht 'el 'el Flplnos sinc. sinc. I hI culd reache mlKht thouiht st1 Fnm'the Fnm'the Lndon Glob. Glob. Fom Lrd L'rsdowne's L'rsdowne's spech wih t 'ldes 'ldes i mak1n 11recton l Wi na\ na\ acton dlf rent ratons ofere treates a- a- bItaton PR SCH .EE .EE St Jo's Jo's GergetWadDreel I- I- tue 'Boyaat 'Boyaat WzScolMeet 51 CUeg tbeGortow Peprtor Shol .ad. .ad. te Dreel I- I- "Utute "Utute Phldpha ltest a. a. dtlons the lst ofs'ol ofs'ol whch w1 represente Intecholato trac ad feld ges 'be 'be Cn. Cn. venton Hllon Jaur 2Man er rcived denUe. denUe. atom 1 insttutons tht theyw1 ech Itronl Irlnl 1 opebe'vents opebe'vents i prb- prb- ahool ad Insttute. Insttute. wU teams cmpetnl Thell "il "il preporltory ahooll wi adl pro aJne Q compettor hlve sholuUo pu I w1 tnt partcpaton trCc 1eld Iame. Iame. prtonance bYI w1 watchd Interet Manaler Fbian hs Ilue aU I cadidate. cadidate. for 'he 'he tt m I bys belun trlnln& trlnln& I rolable the wi a schoel I outook t1ey w1 le peciaJy stronl Iin sprinter lon dl talce r\nners r\nners r\nners i Baltmore Cty Cole e chalenged Gorgetown Peps defnite aswe hs 'et 'et b"en b"en Wet. Wet. 'I 'I I lkelyhowever chalenge wl atepted cose I exctng resul. resul. a.nager a.nager ful strengh wi a al year's year's agIn schol. schol. elgible .Is .Is lke- lke- Washlngon wn catr 'of 'of Il shae Insttute wa tc athletc crcles tul-blooded tul-blooded tul-blooded India hat mie and miern chapion wa membr tea. tea. Insttute .o .o wel .thlsyea .thlsyea ad Cpt. Cpt. Calahan Infored yestef- yestef- that o 'and 'and hurle mie ad 1 cn arrange wi nver e twenu th. th. Interst eSeclaly frst-year frst-year frst-year eah fve w1 entres 6 yard dsh. dsh. colegiate Tourament Crmson Ha Cont stsYale Firt Events :4.-The :4.-The :4.-The :4.-The :4.-The nal thl Intercolegiate llt beween HU Prlnclton wih fnished wih 1-2 1-2 1-2 fat folows afer Toln Wol atet Wodbur Kimbal ater ater Wl- Wl- Iams fnal coleges Harad. Harad. Won. Won. Lst. Lst. Prlneeton. Prlneeton. Prlneeton. Prlneeton. Won LsL Bracett. Bracett. 3 3 0 Mowr 2 1 McClure. McClure. 1 0 Wad 2 1 Howt.nd. Howt.nd. 1' 1' 1' 1' Nelson Nelson 1 1 1 J J Brld&lan Brld&lan 1 2 Wllami. Wllami. 1 Z Z Totals. Totals. 8n 8n 3 Totas. Totas. 6 Columbia Won. Won. Lst. Lst. Yale. Yale. Won. Won. Lst Toln 2 Woodbur. Woodbur. 2 1 1 Tcker 2 2 1 Owen. Owen. 2 1 Luln.1 Luln.1 2 .Jalean .Jalean 2' 2' Wolf 2 Kimbl' Kimbl' 0 8 Tot.I..5 Tot.I..5 Tot.I..5 1 Totle. Totle. 8 coleges 186. 186. 187 188 pettors Caswel 6. 6. resumptin Intera- Intera- tonal commitee ton wih Englsh nversltes chalenge s'oon s'oon as as' as' out whie te. te. TEA Nex Seasn Tle athletc assocl ton Stepen's Stepen's ent'huslastc ent'huslastc meetng hal rarcl hal avaiable a gm- gm- basebal electon a1ager captal I folowlni \n1on \n1on t ard Sunday"shl Sunday"shl athletc associaton Wie mroon pcket trouSr m'aron m'aron wel-known wel-known wel-known amateuisjoln- amateuisjoln- Id assocaton. assocaton. w1 baebal whih wl folowing L. L. Xader L 'nham 'nham Elc. Fcher Lefngwel Lngord. Lngord. FrEd )111er )111er Gorge Dreger FrEderlck Duf socal entertainment frst beIng Post-ofce Post-ofce Post-ofce Hal Januav 6 3"oung 3"oung cass begn Is ver wel assocaton. assocaton. "Tentig "Tentig Od Ground" Ground" Frm Lsle' Lsle' 'aler 'aler Klttldge. Klttldge. thor "Tentng "Tentng .mp .mp Grund et\ et\ lylng Fer. Fer. Evn advLced pleaur pleel. pleel. Kltrde 1rat t.n t.n er arlnea. arlnea. viln tue lnt an. an. meloden Thouh 1' 1' torr yeal hu hu bot ItrUmen t. t. pseulon. pseulon. 77" 77" 77" 77" Cure Cold GRIP GRIP rruulal. rruulal. le Medlot. Medlot. C. C. or. or. wUU ane oh atr"ll. atr"ll. atr"ll. atr"ll. York 0 N'C N'C R I IRONJ N 80 U TH Representatve St rs v AEBI' AEBI' FORMOST T Gorietow Viihda'.n Viihda'.n Nort Carolna Piired i th Selecton AfUat4 wth Souther IntroUeiite Athetc lociton-Norhr lociton-Norhr lociton-Norhr Coch. Coch. Suth. Suth. &wll &wll Illtrltl" Illtrltl" 8porlli Chronoloacal' Chronoloacal' Soutern footbal II II bhInd pla'lnl pla'lnl abll fve ehlndthe Eat. Eat. th8 a or an srongst ele\en. ele\en. ele\en. "est. "est. frst prove b wa demnstratng eiher The merel whch tken judgent critcs I Estern tootbal and. and. I South r footbal. footbal. I I 1s wel defne "Souter 'as 'as aricle. aricle. Souter Intercolegate Atletc Asocaton consdeIed. consdeIed. Georgtown Virgnia 'and 'and olna coleges geogaphical loton otherwse. otherwse. Tey longr'pla longr'pla gmes wih assoca- assoca- ton ee'ens ee'ens an confne actvity aong smler Insttutons povInces. povInces. severanc tons wih team assciaton 'largly 'largly stIcty n- n- torce elgibity rles tat ti orgniaton. orgniaton. Fol Instnce Unversiy Norh Carolna play Vanderbit Unversiy whos wa srongest assockUon Crolna eleve thre ers0rpenter Bar and Siton-who. Siton-who. Siton-who. A rles Inelgible. Inelgible. 1 playa ailnst tese Te Carolna wa notfed us' us' aginst Vanderbit. Vanderbit. Carolna declne wthout gme Al meI player Virgnia Siton mansta Clemon 19 re- re- unanlm1 decded tal telt NQrt Caolna thE tormalt' tormalt' dece regrded tetsh thr ani Carolna. Carolna. I I thty \Id \Id th. th. te wih Carlslp n 1le 1 arf r rulte cole t Geor etown Insttuton rn harly caim b Southern. Southern. It' It' stu pnt rpresentath'el rpresentath'el Is coleges Carolna. Carolna. I chiefy wok universies footbal Est wrier an' an' efort dlstn lsh Suthern DrOPer. DrOPer. Insttutons al the Suth rn Intercolegate ton. ton. Pacifc Co st. st. Te Vanderbl Uflversly wa 1 A.A. A.A. bst theSouth I go I atained Te efcienty asistant universiy came Vanderbit tal fOUd whC 01 s mtch. mtch. scalon deonstrates throu h wihout ping sores proportons aganst waloping a cose T anksgvlng wih a 2-to- 2-to- 2-to- admlnlsteed Universiy kn wn a Vanderbit score 45 2mes Is .pponents. .pponents. gal Ws cross d Mssouri Schol clos enolh lne. lne. Vanderblt 5 I 1 I I I 2 ATOR ie dif- dif- se.nln se.nln a a -th -th e qld guIar o a ppund''the ppund''the spect .eular. .eular. Ifhe 1 9O4 to I I S S S S S S 4ors d bene ted rule-the rule-the rule-the butone A. A. season-June season-June season-June bein limit-un- limit-un- limit-un- ac- ac- nt it th un- un- July.15 July.15 anee-on anee-on anee-on Its sat- sat- 12 S S S S S justthe same-notone same-notone same-notone coaae ewi e th either.out either.out S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S up.in up.in S. S. S S S S S S I I S S S S S S S S S in re- re- fel- fel- S S S S S S S S S $3.33-tor $3.33-tor $3.33-tor $3.33-tor $3.33-tor to.see to.see years 3.2OO. 3.2OO. 3.2OO. HaveYou the dis- dis- lbs chronic-that chronic-that chronic-that diseases IO\V IO\V IO\V O minutes-it minutes-it minutes-it goao whlc'hselbaeh whlc'hselbaeh W wa Lot tus tb naturatabllity'can naturatabllity'can po- po- th constant ,3 ,3 leagues-WaShington leagues-WaShington leagues-WaShington good'.catcher good'.catcher thestock fa.rmore fa.rmore irn- irn- slg- slg- e ex- ex- he op- op- notmany b 'as 'as ut dtove sluggish-botches sluggish-botches sluggish-botches result-take result-take result-take .JJ5ic5..olflers .JJ5ic5..olflers .JJ5ic5..olflers Diversion-Filipinos Diversion-Filipinos Diversion-Filipinos galla itly Zound'baseball Zound'baseball an na- na- young.Japanese young.Japanese at g ou batter'to batter'to of'tbe of'tbe years na- na- ttracted Frotntbe ar- ar- In- In- Hall.ort Hall.ort 1 toni onthe balanced'this balanced'this Contests-Yale Contests-Yale Contests-Yale 24.-The 24.-The 24.-The 24.-The 5 'ro- 'ro- 'ro- Harvard Lost. Lost. Won. Won. Lct. Lct. Braclcett. Braclcett. Mowry McClure. McClure. 13 Ward Howland 1 1 Brldgm&n Brldgm&n Williams Totals. Totals. Totals S Columbia Lost. Lost. Lost Toila 2'4 2'4 5 SVoodbury Tucker Owen LazInu1 4 t&rnesoa t&rnesoa .4 .4 .4 2' 2' Wolff Kimball Totals. Totals. 5'j 5'j 6 Totels. Totels. 4 8 66 ap- ap- or nasi urn. urn. ap- ap- nl t'oon t'oon stockings'and stockings'and V. V. 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