The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 6, 1950 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 6, 1950
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Page 5
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THURSDAY, JULY «, 1950 BLTI'HEVILLE COURTER U. S. Seventh Fleet Can Attack Koreans And Still Hold Formosa, Admiral Says By LKIF KKICKSON ' TOKYO, July 6. (AP)—Vice Admiral Arthur D. Struble said today his Seventh Fleet can strike North Korea and still protect Formosa from possible Communist invasion. The Seventh Fleet was ordered to keep invaders away from Formosa. Struble conferred with General MacArthur after directing a two-day carrier plane ike against North Korea with combined American and British forces. The chunky Normandy Invasion* ; : — veteran told a press conference that carrier pilots destroyed all the North Korean planes they could find In sweeps from Pyongyang southward. The total confirmed kills was ten, he said. Struble said his Seventh Fleet has had "no specific contact" with submarines In the Korean operations. The Navy has estimated the Soviets have about T5 submarines based in trie Pacific. "Nothing Confirmed" Vice Admiral Charles T. Joy, commander of naval forces in the Par East, likesvise said his forces Have had "nothing confirmed" in submarine contacts. A Chinese Central News Agency correspondent pressed Struble persistently on possible Formosa invasion, saying the Chinese Communists had said they would hasten landings on Formosa. "I'm going to be prepared to prevent it if they do," Struble said "Can you?" "I'll Certainly Try" "I'll certainly try, 1 ' Struble re plied. Later he said "I don't anticipate t iing any sizeable Invasion force - through'.' to Formosa. Struble said It was not his in tention to employ Seventh Flee forces In 'any way that, would preclude "keeping the Formosan prob- Jcm in mind." On the Monday and Tuesdaj strikes on North Korea, Slrubli -said: American and British carrier operated as "a single combincc tactical force." Pleased by Operation He is highly pleased with th smoothness of the combined opera tion and "it certainly augurs we! for future operations." Carriers fliers were surprised lack of North Korean planes in the Pyongyang area and southward . bui^_. "I presume they have more far ther north." He lacked planes to keep huntinj through all North Korea. Carrier planes did some "prec. sion work" in the Pyongyang are and accomplished "certain resul 1 to assist our general objective. Struble flew to Tokyo from h cruiser flagship and returned t the ship after the conference. More City Jobs « CHIC AGO—(A*)—The number . en and women who work for citi in the U.S. has reached a recor •high. --:;- .s, ; .-. ... The International City Manage: ' Association reports the total 1 «uch employes was 1,082.000 at tt start of 195D—a gain of 43,000 one year. Payrolls have gone up, to They totaled $219,000,000 in Octobc 1949, compared with $206,000,000 month a year earlier. KIH PWPUTZ AM l-BRIEFXASTEM SEfSOHIBE EL ISTAOOKAMIEMTO KVtHIOJLOSCEKA OE KU BUZC* KOH ?»<*»£ UVWI AUA WSSHIAPOSFM.E THIS MEANS YOU!—Fed up with parkers who ignored his "No Parking" sign near a curb mailbox, postmaster Leopold Morris of Victoria, Tex., erected this signpost that says it in five languages. From top to bottom, the signs soy "No Parking" in Hebrew, German, Spanish, Italian and English. The trouble now is with people stopping too long trying to find out what the signs say. Citrus Trees Con Pay O: HEMET, Calif. (AP)—Folks hereabouts are giving every citrus tree they pass the once-over. The Hemet Valley Citrus Pest Control District has offered a $25 reward to any person reporting a red scale infestation on fruit trees. Citrus shippers reject infected fruit. But it's doubtful anyone will get rich by looking. Only four cases of red scale were discovered last year. Louis Denfeld Is Candidate For Governor BOSTON, July 6. (AP)—Retired Admiral Louis E. Denfeld has announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for governor, of Massachusetts. And his first political fight- promises to be a tuoghy.onc. _, The 59-year old' ousted chief of naval .operations meets three veteran campaigners—former Lt.-Gc?v T . Arthur W. Coolidge, former state's Atty. Gen, Clarence A. Barnes and former Senator Edward W. Bo we. If he wins the GOP nomination, he is faced with the prospect of opposing one of his World War II junior officers, Gov. Paul A. Dever, 48, a wartime lieutenant commander, who appears sure of winning the Democratic -nomination in his bed for a second term. Denfeld retired from the Navy last February after he was removed by President Truman as chief of naval operations during- the armed services unification row. costs in Municipal Court this morn ing on a charge of driving whi under the influence of liquor. Oil Stove Overheats An overheated oil cook stove the home of Walter Webster, 8 South Lake Street was the can a fire alarm this morning. Is GOP to Protest Red Hunt Report Sen. Hickenloopcr Sees No Justification For Act at This Time By MAKVIN L. ARKOWSMITII WASHINGTON, July 6. (AP) — Republican' members ,of a Senate iqulry committee plan a new pro- eso against the Democratic ir.a- ority's decision to get out a pre- uninary report on the stormy Coui- •nunists-in - government, inve-itiga- ion. Senator Hickenloopcr (R-Iowa) iaid the protest, will be made to- norrow when the committee meets >ehind closed doors to take its first ook at a rough draft of the pro- >osed re|x>rt prepared by the group's staff. No Justification "There Is absolutely no Justlfica- lon for any kind of a report, pre- tminary or otherwise, at this time," iickenlooper told a reporter. 'The committee has hardly scratched the iuriace in this investigation." Hickenloopcr and Senator Lodge | <R-Mass) split with the three Democratic members of a Senate foreign, relations subcommittee last week when (he majority pushed through a resolution calling for a report on the inquiry, which began last March 8. McCarthy Charges The tumultuous investigation dealt with charges by Senator McCarthy (R-Wis) that the State Department harbors Communists and fellow travelers. Senator Tydings (D-Md), the committee chairman, has said the report being prepared will be only r'oice of France it Heard PARIS (AP) — The Voice of France Is sounding louder, clearer and further every day In its role a.s a cold war weapon. For some 150 :iours every week, multiple transmitters of Radio Diffusion Francais—which means simply 'Frcnc'n Radio Broadcasting"—hammer at the Iron curtain with broadcasts of news, music and culture. And the men who run the government-controlled radio arc now blueprinting even more. Russian- language broadcasts are to be added to those already going out in Czechoslovakia!). Polish 'and Hungarian. In addition, French Radio broadcasts shortwave programs dally in English, 1 Spanish, Italian, Arabic and. Dutch, as part of a general effort to tell the world about France and its problems. RIT.Z THEATRE Manila, Ark. Thursday "THE MAN ON THE EIFFEL TOWER" Charles I.aughton, Franchot Ton and Robert llutton News * Short Open 7:30. Starts 1:00 Thursday & Friday DOUBLE FKATUKE 'WHEN WILLIE COMES MARCHING HOME" Dan Daily with & Corinne Calve! PLUS "BAD MEN OF TOMBSTONE" with Barry Sullivan and Marjorlc Reynold! Color Cartoon HEAT'S ON—On the roof playground of St. Ignatius Loyola Day Nursery, New York, one of the Sisters of St. Dominic sprays children who came to coo) oft while their mothers are away at work. The nursery is one of 10 in Hie New York Archdiocese and is afliliated with New York Catholic Charities. an interim document, with a final •erdict on the McCarthy accusa- .ions to come later. Hickenlooper and Lodge have nadc it plain, however, that they xpect the Democrats to regard any report made at this time as final. Po//ce Wives Want Raise CHICAGO —(/!')— The women vho share the family budget wor- ics of Chicago cops formed a new organization, the Police Wives Association. One of the first moves of the members was to vole to send n delegation to the state capital .o sec about pay raises for their husbands. Air Conditioned By Refrigeration NEW "Your Community Center" MANILA, ARK. Matinees Sat. & Sun. Ph. 58 Thursday "STORY OF SEA BISCUIT" .Shirley Temple & Barry Fitzgerald Friday SOUTH OF ST. LOUIS' WARNER BROS. BLY I NEVILLES ONLY ALLWHITC THEATDF Thursday & Friday 'DOUBLE FEATURE "DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHI PS" with Lionel Barrvmorr. and Richard Wldmark PLUS "BIG JACK" with Wallace Beery and Richard Conle Color Cartoon and Death Valley Serial fined for Drunk Driving Crua Marado was fined $35 and SKYLINE BLYTHEVILLE'S FAMILY DRIVE IN THEATRE UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT Today & Friday \VANHEFLIN SUSAN HAYWARD SORIS KAKlOfF «l« IONOON WAAO IOMD tICNMOlONO WHITTVID CONNOt SAVE NOW! WANTED EXPERIENCED SALESMAN To Sell Forma!! Tractors and International Trucks. A Good Deal for the Right Man BEN F. BUTLER CO. OSCEOLA A BETTER LAUNDRY For Expert Laundry and Dry Cleaning—Call 4474 NU-WA We're Proud of Our Work work • Woodwork :turing • Welding BARKSDALE MFG. CO. Machine work Manufacturing Box Office Opens 7:30 — Show Slarls 7:-I5 ALWAYS A CARTOON SUMMER DRESSES • Cottons, Pure Silks, Shantungs, Bcm- bergs and Sheers • Prints, Pastels, and Dark Shades • Dressy, Casual, and Sunback Styles • Sizes 9 to 15 —TO to 20, 76!/a to W/2— 38 to 44 All 12.95 & 14.95 Dresses All $10,95 Dresses All S7 99 A $8.,99 Dresses All $5 99 Dresses r + $ 10 8 6 4 Speedometer Repair All Makes & Models — Cars and Trucks One'Day Service — Factory Warranty T. I. SEAY MOTOR CO. 131 East Main Phone 2122 WATERMELONS! Ice Cold 4c Lb. Warm 3c Lb. Cantaloupes 20c Blythevi'le Curb Market 130 East Main -ALL SALES FINAL—HO EXCHANGES, NO REFUHDES . . . Feinberg's For Safe, Profitable.Groin Storage Galvanized STEEL GRAIN BINS Fire-safe, weithertigtit, rodent-proof. Permanent, long-life construction. 1 1000 bm.; U'xl I' — 2200 b«. : l.'*U'_3276bu. ^*^^^ Order Butler Galvanized Grain Bins NOW from nc. INTERNATIONAL ^ARVESTE 312 South 2nd Phone 6863

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