The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on August 27, 1954 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Friday, August 27, 1954
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SATURDAY. AUGUST 27, 1954 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Dodgers Are Showing Flashes of Old Form **** *#** And Walter Alston Has Hopes Up By BEN PHLEGAR Associated Presi Sports Writer It's been a long time coming but the Brooklyn Dodgers finally are showing flashes of the brilliant form that made last year's pennant race a breeze. With three good games under their belts the Dodgers are set for a triumphant tour through the West and the return home when they run head-on into the New York Giants in a three-game series next week-end. Going into today's games they 4 trailed the Giants by 3!& lengths and Manager Walt Alston said he had hopes of cutting the deficit to 2 or 2y 2 before the New York series. "I just hope we can stick on their tail and then get a hot streak in the last week of the season." That last week the Dodgers have six games—three with Pittsburgh and three with New York. Trailed in Ninth The Dodgers showed their mighty power in swamping Cincinnati twice and last night they displayed the vital ability to fight back under pressure when they licked the St. Louis Cardinals 8-4. Brooklyn went into the ninth inning trailing 4-2, A two-run pinch- homer by rookie Walt Moryn tied the score and the Dodgers piled on four runs in the 10th to win going away. Only the starting pitching has been spotty in their recent outings. Carl Erskine was belted for four runs in four innings last night. Fine relief work by Pete Wojey, Clem Labine and Jim Hughes saved the game. Giant* Halt Braves The tJriants put a temporary halt to Milwaukee's pennant aspirations with a 3-1 triumph before a Milwaukee record crowd of 46,944. The Braves got to Sal Maglie. for a run in the first inning but the veteran righthander settled down and held them helpless the rest of the way. Cleveland's American League lead over New York was trimmed to 3 ! /2 games when the Indians were beaten by Washington, 3-2 in 10 innings, and the Yankees defeated Detroit 4-0. The Chicago White Sox trounced Philadelphia 11-0. Boston shaded Baltimore 3-2 and took over fourth place from Detroit. Cubs Win The Chicago Cubs defeated the Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 in 12 innings and Cincinnati edged Pittsburgh 3-2 on Ted Kluszewski's 37th homer in the last of the ninth. Bobby Feller lost a heartbreaker to Johnny Schmitz in the Washington-Cleveland battle. The winning run scored when outfielder Dave Philley booted Mickey Vernon's single long enough to allow Pete Runnels to score from first base in the 10th. Feller gave up only three hits, all bunts, between the second and the 10th. Tom Morgan of the Yankees held the Tigers at bay with six hits, never more than one to an inning. Lack of Bullpen Is Killing Cards ST. LOUIS (AP) — The St. Louis Cardinals bumped into their season-long problem — no bullpen 'Staff — and lost Joiner's Jerry Dean. Is Tabbed As Cinch for Majors by His Pilot A Joiner, Ark., youth who first attracted the eye of major league scouts when at. Ar> kansas State College, has just finished pitching Greenville, Miss., to its first Cotton Statei League pennant in 16 years. another game in the process. Manager Eddie Stanky's crew was leading the Brooklyn Dodgers, 4-, going into the ninth inning Frida night but a two-run homer by pine hitter Walt Moryn sent the gam into extra innings. Brooks Lawrence, victim Moryn's blast, was yanked for pinch hitter in the Cards' nint and then in the 10th Gerry Stale} Al Brazle and Ben Wade parade to the mound as Brooklyn score four runs to put the game out o reach. Staley In 7-10 Staley, in the midst of a poo season, got the loss, his 10th agains only seven victories.. Junior Gilliam doubled in the winning frame, too! third on an infield, and after a walk to Duke Snider, scored on an in field hit. Joe Cunningham threw wildly on a double play grounder fo a run-scoring error and the last twi tallies came off Wade on a sacrifice fly and Carl Furillo's single. Stan Musial, hitless in five trips dropped to .342 while Snider, wrth one out of four, came out with .345 in their National League batting race. Bill Sarni had sent the Cards into an early lead with a three-run homer in the second. Brooklyn scored in the fourth on a walk anc Snider's double and again in the fifth on Furillo's double and Al Walker's single. by the Tigers, tops in the league this season. Irv Noren hit his llth home run. Rivera, Minnie Deliver Triples by Jim Rivera and Minnie Minoso and a home run by Johnny Groth led to eight runs for Chicago in the third inning at Philadelphia. Harry Dorish, normally reserved for relief duty, pitched the shutout. Boston's winning run against Baltimore came in the sixth -with Harry Agganis, who had singled and moved around on an error, scoring after Ted Lepcio's long fly. The Cubs tied the Phillies in the ninth on a home run by Ernie Banks, then won in the 12th when Hal Jeffcoat singled, scampered to third on an error and scored on a beautiful squeeze bunt by Gene Baker. The Redlegs completed the first triple play in the National League this season. With Frank Thomas on second and Sid Gordon on first Legion Series Gets Under Way YAKIMA, Wash. (£>)—It will be Baltimore, Md., vs. Gastonia, N. C., and San Diego, Calif., against Ma-' plewood, Mo., in the opening round next Wednesday of the American Legion's "Little World Series" baseball tournament. The draw was announced here yesterday. The double-elimination tournament, matching survivors of junior Legion regional tournaments throughout tfte nation, will continue through Sunday. Baltimore represents the Atlantic seaboard and New England states, Gastonia the southeast, Maplewood, a suburb of St. Louis, the midwest, and San Diego the west. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Berlin — Billy Gilliam, 217y 4 , Newark, stopped Hein Ten Hoff, 218%, Germany, 7: Pittsburgh — Emil Brtko, 191, Pittsburgh, outpointed Bob Skelton, 178, Pittsburgh, 8. Jack Shepard bounced to third baseman Bobby Adams who stepped on the bag, threw to Johnny Temple at second and Temple's relay to first baseman Kluszewski beat Shepard. Baseball Standings 87 THE ASSOCIATED PEESS NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pet GB New York 79 45 .637 PONY WINNERS — David Holt (left) last night received the sportsmanship award when Blytheville Pony Leaguers were hon- orer with a dinner at First Methodist Church. Jim Killett views the championship trophy won by his Presbyterian Tigers. (Courier News Photo) Holt also is unofficial batting champion (final statistics have not been checked for accuracy) and was a unanimous choice for the all- star team as a first baseman. The all-stars found the Tigers and Rams sharing top billing with three players each. Here's the all- star lineup: 'Pitchers—Bill Wyatt, Joe Bratch- er. C—Slick Nelson. IB—David Holt. 2B—Wayne Honeycutt. 3B—Bill Haney. SS—Ed Moore. LP—Dick Noakes. CP—Bo Huffman. RF—Harold O'Neal. Brooklyn 76 Milwaukee Cincinnati St. Louis . Philadelphia ...71 ... 60 ., 59 .. 58 49 52 66 66 65 76 80 .608 .577 .476 .472 .472 .397 .365 3% ?& 20 20% 2QY 2 30 "* 34 Chicago 50 Pittsburgh 46 Saturday's Schedule New York at Milwaukee Brooklyn at St. Louis Philadelphia at Chicago Pittsburgh at Cincinnati Friday's Results New York 3, Milwaukee 1 Brooklyn 8, St. Louis 4 (10 innings) Chicago 4, Philadelphia 3 (12 innings) Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 2 Leo Nearly Has Discounted Braves By CHRIS EDMONDS MILWAUKEE (AP).— Leo Durocher is a mite dubious about the Milwaukee Braves' pennant chances. "I'm not counting them out, understand," warned the manager of the New York Giants, currently 7 1/2 games ahead of the third-place Braves and 3 1/2 ahead of second- AMER1CAN LEAGUE W L Pet Cleveland SO 36 .714 New York 87 40 .685 'hicago 84 Boston 55 Detroit 55 Washington ... 52 'hiladelphia .. 42 Baltimore 40 46 69 71 72 84 87 .646 .444 .437 .419 .333 .315 GB 8 34 35 37 48 50'/ 2 Saturday's Schedule Cleveland at Washington Chicago at Philadelphia Detroit at New York Baltimore at Boston Friday's Results New York 4, Detroit 0 Washington 3, Cleveland 2 (10 innings) Chicago 11, Philadelphia 0 Boston 3, Baltimore 2 SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION W L Pet GB Orleans ..86 55 .610 — Atlanta 85 57 .599 l 1 ^ irmingham ... 77 61 .558 7% Memphis 71 71 .500 15 J / 2 'hattanooga ... 67 73 .479 18 1 / 2 ittle Rock .... 61 81 .430 25% 'ashville 60 81 .426 26 Mobile 57 85 .401 29 ] / 2 Yesterday's Results Little Rock 4, Chattanooga 2 Nashville 7, Memphis 3 New Orleans 14, Atlanta 2 (Sus- ended after 7 innings) Birmingham 8, Mobile 3 Games Today New Orleans at Mobile Nashville at Memphis Birmingham at Atlanta COTTON STATES LEAGUE El Dorado 10, Meridian 3 ONLY GAMES SCHEDULED) place Brooklyn. "But the statistics are against them." The Giants beat the Braves, 3-1, last night on Sal Maglie's five-hitter which Durocher called "his best game of the year." The teams meet again today with another sellout crowd certain- at County Sta- J dium where last night's game drew a record turnout of 46,944. "I don't count any of 'em out until it's impossible for 'em to win," Durocher said in the clubhouse after the game. "But the way I look .at it, the Braves have got it pretty tough with two teams to catch instead of one. 96 Games "I said at the start of the year I thought 96 games would win the pennant. I still think so and that means I need 17 more out of the 30 we've got left, just a little over .500. "So if I get that many, the Braves have to win 25 of their 31 to tie me, all they can lose is six the rest of the way. "And with both us and Brooklyn ahead, they can't let up at all, even against the rinky-dinks. It's pretty tough." Braves' Manager Charlie Grimm admitted the road to the pennant wasn't any easier after losing to the Giants. "We're still in it, though," Grimm said. "They gotta knock us out to beat us and they haven't knocked us out yet." • Told of Durocher's observations, Grimm shook his head. "Well, then we gotta win 'em all," he said. Little Rock Set For Pro Game And Eagles Art After Their First Win of Season Sports Roundup— Stengel Is Really Set to Quit By GAYLE TALBOT NEW YORK (AP) — Those experts who follow the daily fortunes of the Yankees are convinced now that Casey Stengel will retire to his swimming poor in Glendale, as his wife has been begging him to do for three years, if he fails to win his sixth straight pennant. MINOR LEAGUE RESULTS American Association Charleston 1, Columbus 0 Louisville 3, Toledo 2 Kansas City 9, Indianapolis 3 St. Paul 7, Minneapolis 4 Texas League Oklahoma City 3-9, Tulsa 1-3 Fort Worth 8, Dallas 5 Beaumont 7, Houston 0 Shreveport l, San Antonio 0 Western League. Denver 13-8, Colorado Springs 8- Pueblo 9, Lincoln 0 Wichita 1, Omaha 1 Des Moines 5, Sioux City 1 13 They recall that at his birthday party early in the season Casey said seriously "If I can't win with this team, then I ought to quit and let them hire a manager who can. Players are hired to win, and so are managers." Casey's listeners did not pay him too much mind at the time, but as the tide goes against him they feel certain he meant it. For one thing, they have known all along that he was bitterly disappointed when George Weiss, the Yank general manager, abruptly sold pitcher Vic Raschi to the St.' Louis Cardinals early in spring training. Casey didn't realize that Weiss was on the point of exploding because Raschi, who was holding out in a bep.ch cottage only a few miles from Yankee headquarters, had not even called him by phone to discuss the terms of his contract. Just A Dime "If I'd known how it was," Sten- gM ?c"d <\ reporter, -"I'd ? seen to it .that Raschi called him. I could win another pennant if I had him." So, if Cleveland wins and Cas«y calls it a long career, there are those who always will think it would have been different if a $30,000 a year pitcher had spent 10 cents at the right time. National League President Warren Giles, trying to head off wordy and time-consuming squabbles between the players and his umpires, has advised the arbiters to take a little more time in giving decisions on close plays and, when in doubt, to seek help from one another. No Los* He told them there was no loss of dignity in not being abrupt and cocksure, and that the shining objective was to arrive at the right decision, even if "eventually." This is one of the smartest things said by ft league president in our time and should take some of the strain off the boys in blue. The fact is that every team of umpires has a set of signals which enables one of their number, when partially blocked out on a play and in d'oubt, to get a quick decision from an umpiring mat*. It s been done for a long time, but surreptitiously. Now the umps can get their heads together openly, as they should have all along. Barney Ross, who was a great name in boxing some 15 years ago, came away from one of Rocky Marciano's workouts the other day shaking his greying locks and predicting that the champion was going to burn himself out long before his time if he didn't temper his rigorous training methods. Legion Gets Win At Portageville Blytheville's American Legion Little League team rode the strong: arm of Doug Dorris to 2-0 victory i for the past six months with an LITTLE ROCK t/P) — Philadelphia's powerful Eagles, still looking for their first 1954 exibition triumph, try their , : luck again tonight when they meet the Chicago Bears in a professional football exhibition here. A crowd of about 20,000 fans is expected at War Memorial Stadium for the sixth annual pro game, despite the heat, says stadium manager Allen Berry. It will be the sixth appearance in Little Rock for the Eagles, No. 2 team of the National Football League last year. Chicago, which boasts five Arkansans on its roster, will be playing its first game in Arakansas. No Punch On the basis of 1953 records, Philadelphia appears to be the odds-on favorite, but the Eagles have been unable to find their scoring punch so far this year. In suffering two exhibition losses this summer, the Eagles have managed to tally only 14 points. i They lost 10-0 to the Baltimore Colts and dropped a decision to the ! champion Detroit Lions 17-14. j Chicago, on the other hand, has i one victory and one defeat for the exhibition season. The Bears whipped the Pittsburgh Steelers 24-10, thne lost to Chicago Cardinals 10-0. Much of the Eagles' trouble has seen traced to Coach Jim Thim- ole's quest for a capable quarter- oack to spell passer Bobby Thomason. The second string man, Adrian Burke, has been starting for the Eagles, and probably will get the nod here. Burke, the former Bay or great, has completed 10 of 22 masses so far this year to account for both Eagle touchdowns. Perhaps the most glaring defense o date has been their inability to defend against long passes. Detroit's Bobby Lane made merry with Philadelphia's deep men to give the Lion's heir victory. He's Jerry Dean, who is the property of the Detroit Tigers and seems a sure bet for A or AA ball next year. Dean has just completed a remarkable 15-2 year in leading Greenville to the pennant which they won Thursday night by a half game. • * * He hurled five consecutive shutouts and six for the season to come home with the phenomenally low earned run average of 1.75. Greenville Manager Willis Hudlin, a former major leaguer who once managed Little Rock, makes no bones about the fact that Dean will make the major leagues. One reason: he has what few southpaws have at the age of 23 — control. Blytheville baseball enthusiast J. P. Friend called the attention of Howard Camp, Detroit scout, to Dean in 1951. Tiger scout took a long look and signed the youngster even though he knew Dean to be headed for the Army. Dean reported to the Detroit farm club at Jamestown, N. Y., but shortly thereafter reported to the Army. He saw some pitching duty with Brooks Medical Center, San Antonio, while serving his hitch. First part of this year, Dean was assigned to Little Rock by the Tigers. But earlier, Hudlin had looked over the youngster and when Little Rock didn't appear to be too interested, Hudlin jumped in and fast talked the young hurler onto the Greenville roster. It has only been in the later stages of this season that Jerry has hit his stride. He had not had much work in knocking around Tiger training camps. ^ * * * But Hudlin took him in hand and the Mississippi Countian began to blossom. He got his arm in shape, overcame some painful blisters on his pitching hand and then started blowing them back. So Dean has been getting better and better. His last five efforts have been shutouts, clearly indicating he's too good for Cotton States League competition. Hudlin says, "I'm mighty proud of him. If he keeps on pitching shutouts, his ERA will be minus zero." Dean says simply, "I've been lucky," showing a sense of modesty unknown to another Dean which Arkansas sent to the years ago. majors 20 Trio of Wins For Holland HOLLAND—Teams from Holland took a pair of wins over Cooter Softball teams in Cooter last night. Patsy Majors pitched the Holland girls to their win. McCann was on the hill for Cooter. Hugh James coasted to a win in the boys' game as Holland scored a 22-9 victory. Holland's Little Leaguers took a 6-1 win over Hayti with Robin Depriest the winning pitcher. 4 Toughies Booked for Legion Ring Toughies take over in the feature attraction of the American Legion's wrestling bouts at Memorial Auditorium Monday night. Promoter Mike Meroney has booked four catch-as-catch-can artists for his tag match main event. Red Roberts, the former south- 1 ern junior heavyweight champion, leads the quartet of bad boys in Monday night's brawl. He will be teamed with Butch Boyett, a burly heavyweight who enjoys playing rough. Opposing them will be a couple of Charlies, Charlie Keene and Charlie Carr. Both are veterans At Net Tourney Trabert Has Been Unimpressive Sinct Winning in 1953 By ED CORRIGAJf FOREST HELLS, N.Y. (JP}— Th« National Tennis Championship* got under way on the manicured. lnwn» of the West Side Tennis Cluo to-day. For the first time in many years there is no standout player. Tony Trabert, the defending champion, has played some very unimpressive tennis since the start of the season. However, for the want of a challenger, the former University of Cincinnati student was seeded No. 1, as is customary for the defending champion. If he can play up to his potentialities, no one will beat him. 'Tony drew a first round by* and won't see action, until tomorrow. Vic Counted Out Vic Seixas, his Davis Cup mat*, has had little success of, late and i« conceded little chance of winning the title. His first round opponent is Lt. R. Spencer Brent of Dallas, The Australians—Ken Roaeball,. Lew Hoad and Co.—flopped miserably last year and there were rumblings from Down Under that they were over-tennised. Perhaps the "dark horse" of the men's division is Tom Brown, the San Francisco attorney. Other top contenders include na- t i o n a 1 intercollegiate. champion Hamilton Richardson of Tulane; former champion Art Larsen; Gardner Mulloy; Davis Cup captain Bill Talbert: Rex Hartwig of Australia, Ed Moylan, Straight Clark and Bernard Bartzeru The women's field is topped by Louise Brough, Doris Hart, Shirley Fry and Beverly Baker Fleitz. Bill Marker, West Virginia end missed the College All-Star Football game last season because he had a date with his girl. well known to Blytheville fans. This is the first time in a long time that four rough house artists have been booked on the same program and the evening is expected to get plenty wild before it's over. Things are due to start happening in the preliminaries. Roberts is scheduled to square off against Carr in one of the one-fall bouts with Boyett meeting Keene in the second. Hasty Road, 1954 Preaknesa champion, tossed two excrise boys when training at Kiaelah. Didn't hurt either boy, but Hasty Road wrenched a foreleg. Read Courier News Classified Adi. DELICIOUSLY SEASONED WITH OUR CHILI AND CHOPPED ONIONS TAKE HOME SACK—6 FOR $1 DRIVE IN KREAM KASTLE over a group of all-stars at Port- returns o ring action asreville last nieht I tonight when he meets Joey Taylor Dorris allowed but one scratch! f J ID-round bout at War Memorial hit and struck out 13 in the six- i Auditorium, inning contest. Ott Mullins' crew utilized bunts to produce their winning margin. Portageville will return the game, coming here on Friday. Poddy Young Fights Again SYRACUSE, N. Y. (/P) - Paddy Young, who has been on the shelf Young, a New Yorker, was beaten by middleweight champion Bobo Olson a year ago. The bout will be televised (ABC) nationally starting at 8 p.m. (EST). ONLY 2 LEFT Reg. $459.00 1-Ton York Deluxe Window Unit AIR CONDITIONER Reduced To Only Installed Plus Electrical Installation CHARLEY'S ELECTRIC CO. 112 South Fifth Street — Blytheville. Arkansas Tel. PO 2-2993, Nite Tel. PO 3-6109 or 3-4029 NOTICE To my Friends and Customers: Effective immediately no more fish stories accepted- Arch Lindsey's cannot b* topped. He has been declared the champion. Eddie's Liquor Store and Billiard Parlor 122 East Mate Phone 3-9713 Now Selling Oldsmobile-GMC Westbrook Irrigation Co. 225 N. First Phone 3-4161 Hoi Everything to (frigate Anything The Ability to Engineer and Install Sprinkler or Flood Systems The Equipment and Trained Men to Maintain ISTIMATtS WITHOUT OBLIGATION WRESTLING Monday, Aug. 30 8:15 Adults 50c — Childrtn 15c One-Fall Matches Tog Match RED ROBERTS CHARLEY KEENE and vs. and BUTCH BOYETT CHARLEY CARR Roberts Boyett vs. Keene Cecil Connell Cecil Connell, who ha* hid many years experience in selling automobiles, is now selling Olds- mobiles and GMC trucks for Homer-Wilson Motor Co. Mr. Connell wishes to thank his many customers of the past and invites them to visit him and take a "Ride in a Rocket." For the Best Deal in Town On the Best Car or Truck in Town— OLDSMOBTLE — GMC See CECIL CONNELL or JOE WARREN at Horner-Wilson MOTOR CO. 30$ E. Main Phone 2-3*54 Dodge-Plymouth PARTS Entire itock of BIytheTllIt Motor Co., part* hat bota »ot«4 to 195 West Main, noxt door to General Hardware and Appliance Co. For fMi Mnioo ov these parti dial PO i-trn Special Prict Oil Dodge-Plymouth Seat covers w

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