The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 8, 1943 · Page 3
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Tuesday, June 8, 1943
Page:
Page 3
Start Free Trial
Cancel

TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 1943 BLYTHEVfLLB '(ARK.?. COURIER NV.WS' Shortening Shortage Brings Bread Battle BY (IA1.NOK .MAIUXJX •NEA rood and Markets Kdil'or You might not think of blseulls fis being unpatriotic—unless they were leaden lobs of dough capable of sabotaging war-workers' efficiency, However, Dr. Kussel M. Wilder, chief of the civilian Requirements Division, Food Disillbution Administration, snys that all biscuits "re unpatriotic because fats lire so dlrely needed for explosives; therefore we should stick to breads' requiring less .shortening. For lovers of hot breads and home-made pics, the Burciui of Human Nutrition and Home Ecu- noatlcs, Department of Agriculture, Is perfecting fat-saving recipes, Including a patriotic I'le Crust and .Biscuits 'Wartime Style. To prove wliat they can do lo save fats and ut the same time feed Ihc Million, tlie bilking industry lias announced Hint at least 20 pel- cent more bakery goods are beliii produced this year witli Ihe same amount of shortening us used last year. On the other liimd, the millers of the counlry are pointing with nliirm to the drop in home baking since rationing of fat began. Sales of family-type flour have dropped 30 per cent since rationing, accord- ng to the Department of Agriculture., Some flour distributors report drop of l>0 per ccul in certain areas and an overall drop of 45 per cent. •SITUATION CltlTIOAJ,, MILLKItS SAV During Ihe Inst war, all baked goods had to contain 20 per cent other than wheat flour. Hut lliis lime the government is urging civilians to use more wheat products, \Dononitration :$>*: - v **jftt Club Newi Note* .vl, Burdettc News Miss Helen Anders wiio has been attending Hie University of Arkansas, Payeltevillc, has returned to spend the Slimmer with her par ents, Mr. and Mrs. P. O. An<lcr of Burdelte. Seaman 2nd Class J. D. Hulchcr Eon is now boxing instructor at 111 1 Naval Training Station at Sal Diego,, Calif. Pic. Jim Conner visited Mis. Betty Chafin of Burdettc durin tlie past week. A former employe of the A-H Sheet Metal Compan and resident of this city, Pfc. Con ncr is stationed at the Army Ai Base at Smyrna, Tcnn. Mrs. Kenneth Young lias jolne her husband, Seaman 2nd Clas Young, in Memphis. Mrs. Young the former 'Miss Bcttc Hipp o Blythevillc. S-Sergl. and Mrs. Charles Frazie of BlythEville visited relatives rorlsmouth, Ohio, recently. The were accompanied by Mrs. Fraxier's sister, Miss Betty Chafin, of Bur- dettc. ! YAltltllO STUDIES CANNING I Miss Minnie Foster led n discussion ou I'ommuniiy eiuudng' ut Ihc Varbro Home Demonstration Club meeting Tuesday at the home of Mrs. Kl/n Wheeler. Al this time )>lans were made I'o meet at 'the Heme l!tonomic.s Collage on Friday to learn more about food' pro M'rvntlon. | A motion was made and carried I lo extend an Invitation to all the. jteachers at (he Yaibro School lo become honorary members of the Club. Tin; devotional was Riven by Mrs. Dave Abfoull after which Mrs. 13 A. l!ii|!t; led the group In singing During the social hour ijame.s were pluyed ami prixe.s given to Mrs. liugi! and Miss Foster, T)ic If) present were served sandwiches and ,iced drinks for refreshments, The, next meeting will be ; June H al the home of Mrs, Biujenc Me CJulre.. Have a look—:n»| iicrhajis :i nostalgic siilll— at n vanishing household all. II semis llr.il alinosl nobody bakes lirruil al Inline these ihiys. In addilion, huine-muile pastries have fallen olT so shin-ply Dial millers are selling from :10 to 45 per mil less Hour, The critical scarcity of fats is responsible, for (liere's plenty of wheat. The new Flying Jeep, or Sentinel, carries a pilot and eui obsci'ver, two-way radio equipment and is dcisifnied for unusual stability in the'air so tliat the pilot .can con- centrate'on observing'with a 'minimum of stalls or spins. Flowers to Sow if You Are Late •specially wholcgrain flours and jereals, because of their high food value and abundance. Miller's Jiorlening and taking powder nian- ifaclurers are trying to convince Washington that the rationing of 'nts Jias cut clraslically . Into Ihe ise of our non-rationed wheat sur- ilu.s. They regard Ihe drop in home baking as a national, emergency. As a quick solution, the Hour milling industry wants shortening unit certificates packed with family flour. They suggest that tlie rate should be 1 unit for 5 jraunds of family flour, 2 units-for 10 pounds, 6 units for 25 pounds. A unit certificate would gel 1-2 pound of shortening. While some interests are bal- tllng for more liberal rationing of fats in order to increase consumption of our surplus wheat, commercial bakers, many food exerts and government officials responsible for our war economy say it isn't necessary. Home-made biscuits and cake may have gone into a slump for the duration, but commercial bakers are supplying enough baked goods to make up tlie loss and no one need worry about using our wheat surplus, according to Pelei G. Pirrie editor of the influential Bakers' Weekly. The rationing of shortening Is lot the only cause of the decrease n home baking. The time required for more than 18,000,000 Victory Gardens, for home canning •uid and for volunteer defense work s one reason. The increasing number of women employed in war industries is another. The rationing of cooking fuel in sonic areas affects home baking, too. The OPA reports that since 1934 tticre has been a definite trend toward increased commercial baking and a dropping off in home baking. While there has been a further decrease in flour consumption since rationing, OPA figures at the moment do not indicate a serious con- A FEW EASILY GROWN ANNUALS WILL .KKP THE HOUSE SUPPLIED WITH DECORATIVE 60UOUETS ALL /THROUGH TH&. SUMMER.. Tlie 12 'members present (U 111 Shady Lniic Home l)enii)n.slratlol Club nnsweiTil roll call at Ihc Ins meeting l>y telling of new cdlbl PAGETHMB slips. iMi-.s. Mufry Mclliiffcy was ut luxsless. 'Hie devolloniil was given by Irs. Mclliiffcy nnd poems read by he hosle.ss, who also showed lhi> ui'sts lifr new dining ,romn nnd ;IU'hrn,liii]novcinciiis added to llu> iiimo rro'iitlv, I'lons for the booth ivl the Coun- y KultMvere discussed. Hoses, siveel ptns and oilier Sumner flowers di'coraled Ihe onler- '.lintui! rooms. 'I'll! 1 lioslrss mvtsl lolly with cuke nnd iced leu. Mrs. S. Onffs will cnkrhiln llu> club July 7. . Crider News l.lrlll. Kreil 1'. Jacobs Jr., who I iilloiu'il with the Nuvy All 1 Vorros Jacksonville, Mil,, Is .sprntllnn his fnrlnuyh with his mother, Mrs Kred I'. Jmrubs ill driller. His fulli- IT, Colnni'l .Jacolw, Is In Ihn Army at iMhmtii. I.icutennnt Jacobs was rti'rtdunl- c<l from Anmipolls In MHO am wiis on nclivi- sen duty tor lw< Husbands! Wives! Want new Pep and Vim? Tfirtrtnomla ol rmiiilrn uto wi'nlk. woni-oni, lii'MHl livi-u'lM' n»'J' mt^ .iK.I(rl-rl Iron Ktihr Dril •cars, no iins served In Ihvco lienlers of war—at 1'earl Harbor, Iceland nnd on Midway, lie re- •enlly reivlveil his wings at I'pn- iiuolu. Ha., ami now Ls » dive iuml;cr pilot Inslmclor at Jacksonville: I!libber elii'inlsls say me tires innde within the lust t\w years wen 1 MI i-'iod dial. Ihey couM stnnd n a garage lor lour joai.i ur , ; Will) lU'lrrii>lnt v nn nri' ^mounlhlc. o more (iirm 15 por cent Vj]llf| News 'Of WAACs,i WAVES and SPA ftS ,., i MjfiK Mary Mll/iilicth WlilUj of Dlylhcvjlle hits,.recently bceii nc- eepicd for ciillslmriit In) Hie WAVK8 tiiul has |i'R for Hunter College, New York City, lo> begin boot U'lilriliiK. ' • iMIss Kllriilielh Thorn of 1 Mem- plits. niece of Mra. M. A..' Isaacs, hns been accepted for entlsTmeni In the -W.AVC8 and will . for basic iislnlng at Smith. College, North Hamilton, Musi. fcoutli America ha 1 ! 131 ,«X!Clc<i of niflnm'fnls, bill 103 of IneSe 'are found only In lirazll. »~t^rf HEJVf anllcooUwayheit rusli, ni«llid|)])rovcntit. ftprlnklo ^Illi Mcxsana, ,1'owihr. Get MOIMM. dllton. For women who .still have nn iu- lexlble .prejudice against -'slorc ake," home economists arc MIJ:- iesting ways to mnkc-shortening go urther nnd how to use home fats n baking, lo ease the strain on (he •ed ration, points needed for com- ncrcial shortening. Bacon drip- Jings and chicken fat produce good •c.sulls in cukes, breads and biscuits with high flavors, and chicken fal can be used In pic cms! and biscuils. I'KKl'AKHI) M1XTUHES IN DEMAND Sales of baking mixes hnve increased greatly since rationing. These are combinations of lal and flour and other ingredients, ready to mix up and bake al home in double quick time. The War Food Administration and the OPA have made available lo manufacturers of those baking mixes, as well as lo commercial bakeries, fats and oils In amounts which approximate 100 per cent of 19'I2 use. Commercial bakers are studying ways to make their allotment of fat (100 per cent the same period in 1942) go further. Not only can they sell all Hie-bread, am 1 , cake they can make, bill Ihe demand lor cake in defense areas has jumped 35 per cent. This spectacular increase is due to the popularity of cake in war worker's lunch boxes. from lack of 8100D-IRON Then try Lydin PInkham's TABLETS-OTIC of the bost nml quickest, homo \vays In simple nneinla to help build xip rctl blOOd tO GET MORE STHENGTH. A yrCnt ulooU-lrontoulc I Follow labclrilrcctlons. lydiaPinMiani'sTABtCTS ASPHALT BOTTOM COTTON PICK SACK! THE LONGEST VTEMING COTTON PICK SACK 0» THE MftffKET. OUTL4STS TWO OR-' THREE DUCK BAGS - BY ACTUAL TESTjJf J THE ASPHALT BOTTOM WEARS LIKE IROJtl .PLENTY OF 9 Ft FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERSt If June comes with" no flower seeds sown, there is still lime to have flowers in your Victory garden. Suppose you demanded a combination of (lowers which \vould germinate in five days (in warm weather) and flower in thirty to forly. Hero arc some you might get: . . . Zinnias, ageralum, alyssum, can. dylufl, ccntaureas, clarkia, cyno- glossum, annual sunflowers, morning glories, annual pinks, leplo- sync, linaria, marigolds, poppies. > Such a list might be very rnuch enlarged by including varieties which will germinate in a week or ten days. But it would be interesting to see what sort of garden could be made of just a few flower families, seeking interest by using different colors and types. Take zinnias for example—they could hardly 1 be omitted from a garden of annuals. There are tho small-flowered singles, the small lilliput doubles, the intcrmediato or "pumila" lypc and the giant flow- cred varieties. They give ari abundance of pink, red, orange and yellow varieties wilh a few lavenders. A whole border might be planted jnoslly fo zinnias, provided one used enough agcratum, conlaurea and cynoglossum to introduce tho needed blue tones; I There is no reason to confine your Bowing to the quickest germinating subjects. AH annuals can be sown nt this time and will bear flowers by mid-July. They grow much faster in warm weather and their flowers are finest in the last half of the season, usually improving until frost arrives, WASTE FATS Are Urgently Needed In The Manufacture of Munitions! \ Mrs. Housewife: 1. Save WASTE FATS And GREASES- 2. Into CLEAN CAHS- 4. SELL It to Your MEAT DEALER! 3. Keep In COOL PLACE- Mr. Dealer: We Will Collect and Reimburse You for Any And All Waste Ka(s Collccled From Your Cuslomcrs! NUNN PROVISION CO. 221-26 Cherrv We believe that you, both as a customer and citizen will be interested in this company's progress and problems ( because our business of providing low-cost and dependable electric service is an important contribution to the welfare of the communities we serve .'.'. it is a vital factor in our mutual war effort. If you are interested in a more detailed report than this space permits simply drop a post card in the mail requesting a copy of our Annual Report which shows graphically the company's activities and financial status for 1942. Address to: ARK-MO POWER CORP., BOX 641, BLYTHEVILLE, ARKJ^ ,v ><*]?<•& :,* - * OUR EMPLOYES 1 No longer nrc Ihe sales people and employes of Ihe company inlioikicinj; new iabor - Bavini; eleclrical c<]iii|xncnt to our custom- 'era ta mnko their lives easier. They ore cither in •^ the Armijd Forces or busily' j- \ enisled in more essential civilian Activities to release the pressure of labor short-. rifle within the .company.. Sinco there i.1 no new equipment Available ll is their primary concern to maintain service and help , customers conserve their, present clcclricul ^equipment and keep It operating. .tffift-EXJJTy, 1 .^/- Aflcr the war Ihcre will be many new ^ labor-saving devices nnd these same jwopte will want lo resume their natural peacetime' job of introducing bcllcr ways ol doing tnsks mid serving customers.} ., ( V Cf '' There is very lllllc ale * tricnl equipment that >c ; be purchased liow to.<Io es- j ' scnlial \vork. So wo ni-o looking for all equipment t , In tho territory wo serve ' i that is not being use:! mul f some customer wishes lo sell. We make a record of j tills and know where II to should we receive an iii- ' ^ qulry from any one of our "i 17,500 customers In, South-'. . ; \ cast Missouri or Norllica.st I ,j Ark/insns. We do nol sell , this equipment or even accept a commission. Wo merely'act as a clear- * ln(! house for all equipment Tint] allempl to assist Ihc buyer by findint; a seller. Should you have any idlo eleclrical equipment or wish to purchase any electrical equipment, call your local manager and he will be glad . I to assist you. This is a free wartime service I in addition- lo our reoular duties.' •'( APPLJANCZ SEPV/CE HOMES£f?WC£ACMWT/ES i AH' of our service men j havo 'attended a" special Irainiiijj c 1 a s s ( showing them how to conserve critical malevials in repairing tmd maintaining tlie opera-' . tion of your electrical ap- •• - pliances and equipment.. ^Your . electrical Appliance' dealer has also converted . his peacetime sales orijani-l zation. Do nol delay the repair o( any of your equipment — IT CANNOT UE REPLACED.* Call your local electric dealer's appliance ', service man or our office. If we or your dealer cannot make Die repair, we will find the', proper person to do the job for you.V^-a'.Vj^, '"^WPBBMfc^A... j "Health for Victory" Is the thcino ol your electric . company's Home Service Department. • Instead of ^ conducting demonstrationsJU, to introduce new electrical,a (*\ appliances lo hoincmakors, Sj ""^ Miss Camillc , Robinson, > Home Service Adviser, Is ) conducting "Health for i' Victory Club" meetings in i n i cooperation with OCD, over *° KLCN Ihc fourth Thursday ,' of eacli month al 2:30 1'. M. V . Each mcetirn! covers the subjects of "How to Care for Your Equipment" aod ''The Proper Preparation and Planning of Healthful Meals for Your Family." JOIN THE CLUB-U costs nothing and will help you nnd your family. Simply sciul n posl card to Station KLCN alter you have heard otic meeting on the air and you can bccoaie a member. W&/CM " i Investors' Capital .^S* < .«H»»V %*W»,tt«..->'*>V v Business Management ^ /*•«», ^ •«<.. «v . : Loyal Efficient Employes , * vl f '• ' . '* *Building Electric • Systems *«" ''•• ™> To Provide Abundant Power WAR NEWS fj off the wire In your 'j home at noon every day j to | supplement, your daily or weekly newspaper. News that is yours as soon as It happens — by REDDY KILOWATT,' your Electrical Servant. ln to station' d!al) 9DO kilocycles at 12:45 noon for a 10-minute news flash each day, to keep you Informed these days when , , anything can happen. ( ' , ) Since Pearl Harbor your f electric service company ' has been called upon and is now serving new essen-i | ^ lial industry and two f Air Fields and is prepared to serve three new pump- } ing stations on a vital * There has been no power \ ' V shortage in this area — , thanks to far-sighted, c((i- ] cicnt business management | 1 and the everlasting efforts ; of employer to improve service. The systems ol inler-connccted lines stand ready to deliver power in sufficient quantity wherever I most nnd wilh fewer mtcrruptionj. f .. A,:; ARK-MO POWER CORR iTr

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free