The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 6, 1938 · Page 1
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 1

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Thursday, January 6, 1938
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BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THE DOMINANT NKWSPAPEB OP NORTHEAST ARKANSAS ANI) BODTHEA3T MISSOURI Blythevllle Courier Blythevlllc Dully News VrIT TIMT-> vvvnr wr\ n*c\ myuicvuio courier Biytnevmc uaily News UILUME XXXIV—NO. 249, Blythevllle Herald Mississippi Vuliey Leader BLYTIIEVILM'}, ARKANSAS, THURSDAV, JANUARY (!, NEGROES ON SINGLE COPIES FIVE CEN1> COURTROOM Bitterly Attacks Measure As Unconstitutional Political Gesture New Ruling of Land Redemptions Is Given LITTLE HOCK. Jan. 6.—Persons redeeming tax-forfeited lands from the state between January 1 and the third Monday In Febrmu-y— the Ix-elmilng of tin- tax [.uylnj period must iud" *• in the u>- demptlcn fee the amount of. taxes due- on the property for the previous year under an Arkansas supreme court ruling of December 20, Attorney General Jack Holt has held in an opinion to Land Commissioner Otis Page. WASHINGTN, Jim. 6 <AP»— Senator Tom Connally (Dem.. Tex.) today opened a bitter fight to kill the anil-lynching bill on grounds it is an "unconstitutional political gesture" and a "gratuitous insult to the southern states.' Connally's declaration was the opening blow In a battle by n bloc of IS southern senators, aided by Senator William E. Borah (Rep,, Idaho), same of them privately described the fight as nn undeclared filibuster. Charges Public Misled The Texan charged that the public had been misled In regard to the bill, that It "deliberately exempts from its operation gang murders In the great cities" and "encourages and accelerates the mad waves of crime in other sections." "It may wipe out the governmental and judicial systems of the 48 states," Connally declared. "We are against the destruction of the states. We are against the emasculation of state courts. Lynching has almost vanished. Qaiie murders—organized murders in the great cities and in many other sections—have Increased rapidly and defiantly. Political Gesture to Hurlcm "The south will stamp out lynching. The bill is plainly, palpably, admittedly a political gesture, to capture the colored vole In Harlem and a few so-called pivotal states. Its admitted purpose is to pillary and insult the south to .. gather a few colored votes, in a sordid political game. . ' -' 'The 'bill Is ..Wholly. uViconslitu- ~tional.'It'is a plain invasoh of the polce power of the states. We, who oppose the bill, do not condone lynching. It is murder. We are against It. "The public Is often deliberately misled. Misbranding and false labeling is a common abuse. The so-called anti-lynching bill is case in point. The public is told it will prevent lynching, that those who oppose it are opposed to this desirable objective. Both are false." FBA Operative To Question Prisoner Hc!ol In Pocahontas Jail POCAHONTAS, Ark., Jan. UP)—Sheriff James T. Thompson >f Randolph county today asked 'BI operatives in Little Rock to ome here and attempt to identify ne of the three men held here for obbery as the kidnaper of Charles Vfattson of Tacoma, Wash. According to Sheriff Thompson me of the three men held In the Randolph county jail on robbery charges fits the description of an artist's drawing of the Mattson kidnaper who on Dec. 27, 193G abducted the Tacoma child for r; ran and then killed it. Will Investigate LITTLE ROCK, Jan. 6 (UP)— Federal Bureau of Investigation officials here today said an opera- Mve would be in Pocahontas by light/oil lo view the Mattson kid- naping suspect held there by Sherff J. T. Thompson. Missouri Woman Dies At Dyess On Tuesday DYESS. Ark., Jan'. 5.—Mrs. Rose Bryant. 11, wife of o. H. Bryant of Licking, Mo., died here Tuesday morning at the Dyess hospital Mrs. Bryant had been visiting lithe home of her daughter, Mrs Paul Wiggins. " Besides her husband she is survived by three daughters, Mrs. A B. Williamon of Toledo, Ohio; Mrs Freda Kelley of Hayti, Mo.; Mrs Wiggins, a son, Hayti. and a Wakeford of Norris City, 111. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Methodist church in Hayti by the Rev. Mr. Bulltngton of Parma, Mo. Burial was in the Hayti cemetery. .jencral Motors 1 lead Says Me Hopes Labor Layoffs Are Temporary WASHINGTON. Jan. o (UP».~ Wllliam S. Knudscn, president of General Motors, testified before the senate unemployment committee today that he hoped for n "business comeback In the spring" that would make current labor layoffs temporary. Naturally I have hopes of comeback In the spring," Knudsei. told the committee inquiring into cause and extent of unemployment. "I hoiie that the layoffs will be temporary," h e said. "We don't want to lay people off. We can't make money that way." Used Car Sales Down Asserting that heavy decrease in used car sales had been the greatest problem, Knudsen said lhat the corporation experienced the sharpest drop in history late In 1037—a drop that was "unexpected and beyond control." He said he made the decision to lay olf men and believed his action was better than putting nl the men on very short hours because effect, of this probably would be more widespread and severe. Roosevelt's Best, Backer House ,Judiciary Committee Members W a n t Clay Ashabranner Home North of Manila Burns Dil .Stove Explosion Damages Copter Home C O O T E R, Mo. — Considerable damage was done to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Jordan near her c Tuesday when an oil stove exploded. The stove and curtains, shades MANILA, Ark., Jan. C. — The home of Clay Aslmbranner, farmer, living about a half mile north of Manila, was destroyed by fire late yesterday afternoon. Members of Aslmbranner's fam- and paper In badly Injured, woodwork and the kitchen were as well as other furniture. ily did not discover the fire in time to remove their household goods and clothing. • ' , MrT Ashnbranner said lie had no. 1 insurance on the property but planned lo rebuild. He said a defective flue the fire. was responsible for Greene County Slayer Will Seek New Trial trial neys Hanwok Is Bombed By Japanese Planes Today HANKOW, China, Jan. G (UP).— Japanese airplanes bombed Han- kow heavily loday and it was feared that casualties would be high. Plying in perfect forma lion having been found guilty. He wa.5 the planes bombed the airport and .'accused In Ihe slaying of Prank Circuit Judge G. E. Keck will preside at n hearing here tomorrow morning when motion for a new will be presented by Attor- for Vei-noii Dncus, who was recently convicted at Paragoulcl on n charge of voluntary manslaugh- Leaving Hie Capitol after his 'speech opening Congress, President Roosevelt was Icosely followed, above, by his 84-year-old mother, Mrs. Sarah. Delano Roosevelt, who was one of Ills enthusiastic homers in the House gallery a feu- minutes Oelore. Hold Funeral Services For Mrs. Fred Easley BASSETT, Jan. 5.—Funeral services for Mrs. Marie Dorhmon Easley, 20, of Tun-ell, were held at the church here Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Easley was a former resident of Bnssett. She died Saturday at the Little Rock sanitarium, in which'she had been a patient !oY a vear. She is survived by her husband, Fred Easley, and four small children. Miss Johnnie Clark Joins School Staff at Dyess DYTSS. Ark., Jan. 5.—Miss Johnnie clnrk of Jonesboro has been assigned to the Dyess school sys^ tern. Miss Clark, who attended Ar- knnas State College at Jonesboro, has been teaching for some lime Dacus wns years in the sentenced to penitentiary two after the radio station. Stt'i WELL YOU BY -~ -•-, BOB H BURNS and Pass Swindle. Answer Fire Alarm The fire department was called " 'M ^insan avenue at 9 - 30 B?ro!i Bryant 1 " °' CloCk lhls raorni "5 afler a sllOTt istc»&s Lcrn "™* ln a " clsctrlc refrigerator ^ cr ^,... «, „ had caused a slight blaze, practically no damage was done. ' The house is owned b>- John C. Thurmond of Gracey, Ky. Stock Prices NEW YORK, Jan. 6 (UP) — Stocks advanced one to three points today to the highest levels since December 24. AT&T H91-2 Anaconda Copper 33 i-g Associated Dry Goods 71-2 Bethlehem Steel 631-8 Boeing Aircraft 34 Chrysler 53 3-8 Cities Service 17-8 Coca-Cola .- 120 Oeneral Electric 43 3-3 General Motors 33 3-4 rnt. Harvester . ' 6G ' Montgomery Ward 34 N. Y. Central 18 The other day I was asked to Packard a make a dinner speech at a fancy I ""Hips Petroleum 421-8 kennel club here In Los Angeles, I ™°>° • 63-4 at Rison. She will loach the fourth grade nl Ihe Center school. Planters Credit Group Loan Volume at New Peak Minor Cases Occupy Municipal Court Today Petit larceny and public drunkenness cases occupied municipal court today. "Curlev" Jones was fined $10 on a charge ot petit larceny nnd 5^^ra n cf&'£ « «- -*•«« i ° «*™ tnrbing the peace. A charge of petit larcency was dismissed. Six paid fines or forfeited bonds of $10 or more on charges of public drunkenness. The yenr 1937 was the best so far for the Planters Production Credit Association of Misslssipp cnuntv. according to A. T. Bell of Osceola, secretary-treasurer of the nssoci.it Ion. Peak volume in loans climbed lo $218,000 in 1937. as compared with a volume of $115,000 In 1S3S. Such a. volume of business, Bell says. riicir Chairman Named Windsors May Lease Estate In California SAN MA'ITO, Calif., Jan. 0, (Ul 1 ),— A repri'scnlalive of the- Dnko and Duchess of Windsor has miidc Informal Inquiries oonccm- Inj! possibility of leasing iv 58-acre rstato n the fashionable Mcnlo 1'jirk dlsirlcl for ana us the liilurc home of the fivmod couple, It was learned definitely today. T!io negotiator sought Uio c.slnlo of [fon nouijlas, wonltliy Inventor uul scientist, WASHINGTON, Jan. 0 (III 1 )).— Members of the house Judiciary t'ommltlrc today ilrnftod :i ijelltlon to President. Ruosi'vrlt asking him lo appoint tlu'li' c-halnniin, Hepre- KeniUlve Unlloii W. Snmnrr.i (IX, Texas) to llio supremo court vn- Ciincy etnised by retirement of Jus- llfp George Sii'lherlHiul. WASHINGTON, Jan. G (UP).— Ill u letter dalcd Jan. r> and made public today, Preslitimt Roosevelt acknowledged the letter of Associate Justice Oeorgc Sutherland, revealing his plan lo retire from the supreme bench on Jan, 18. Mr. Roosevelt acknowledged the letter as New Dealers proclaimed Hint Sutherland's retirement would 01*11 a now ova of lllwral trends, n fui'llier extension of federal powers mid Judicial protection of nd- mlnlsli'atlve powers. Mr. Roosevclfs letter: "My dciir Mr. Justice Sutherland: > "I have received your letter telling me of vour proposed retirement from n-'iilnr. iicllvo service on tha bench, this rt>tlrcmnnt< lo l>n eifec- "Mny I send yon niv folMt.ni Ions on your many years ol public service? "May I also express the sincere, hope of Mrs. Roosevelt and myscll lhat we slinl) have the privilege oi seeing you and Mrs. Sutherland nt the dinner at the White House on Jnn. 20?" The Jan. 20 reference was to tho dinner given annually by tho President nnd MM. Roosevelt for supreme court Justices. ..-.,..,,•'••- ..John V. Landrum Of Paragould Succumbs Mr. nnil Mrs. Sam I.undriun nnd Mr. and Mrs. Walter Waddy were and Interest maturities on "improve- j ctlll(!tl to Pnrngould early today menl districts. The total Pulnskl ''eccause of the death of John V. " " " "" Landrum County's Gasoline Tax Turnback' Is $6,830.43 LITTLE EOCK, Jan. 0.—Coun 7 ties In Arkansas received $55,659.22 more from the gasoline tax turn- back In 1D37 in 103C, Stale Treasurer Karl Page said yesterday. The 1037 turnback totaled $73-1,339.95, compared to $678,660.13, the previous year. ' . -<:i-.,..-'.,... All of Mississippi county's total allotment of $5,930.43 of the fourth quarterly turnback was withheld to pay tjoncl and interest mnturiUes on improvement districts. The total Pulaskl county allotment of $0,830.4.'! of the fourth quarterly turnback was withheld lo pay bond 'ush Search For Plane Ilia I Disappeared On Routine Might SAN DIEQO, Calif,, Jnn, fl (UP) • A ulntu navy patrol bomber has been missing more Ihan 20 hour!, nnd the tale of Its crew of seven officers nnd men has not been established, the navy admitted U>°P' F The plane, uttiiclied to V-P 7 iciundroii. which lust year won the Sclilff trophy for Ihe finest- record In the niivy. was nlonc on a rotillno "security patrol," far ot llic California const when it dls- fipiienrcd yestei'dny. Today two coast guard cutters, the Ilasca anil Aurora, destroyers nnd more tlinii a score of nnvj planes wcro engaged in search. ler Companion Identifies Pair; Spectators At Trial Searched ', Asks Enforcement of Order Against Ford WASHINGTON, Jnn. fl (UP)).— The national labor relations bonrd announced Uxlay that It hnd forwarded by mall to the sixth circuit court of appeals In covlngton. Kv., a petition asking enforcement of Us "cense, m>4 desist" order agitlnsji. thi) Ford Motor . cpnipjuijt. » The 'petition said U soiight court™ notion following refusal of the Ford company to nlride by the N.L.R.B. couny allotment of $11,343.45 was withheld for the same reason, Paul Revere's Ride Only 12 Plus Miles LEXINGTON, Mass. (UP) — Painstaking measurements, with the use of contomuornry raid maps, reveal Uiis paradox: That Paul Revere, on his Immortal Midnight Ride, covered only 12 8G-88 miles. Whereas William Dawes, the little known express rider who fulfilled a similar purpose over a Landrum, father of Mr. nnd Mrs. Waddy. Mr. Lnndrtim, who had lime fccliiiB slightly iil for several days, was believed to be Improving until K short tlrno before his death at 1:30 o'clock this morning. He was 84 years of age. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at the family residence with Ihc Rev. J. W. Culver, pasloi 1 of Hie First Afelhodlst church of Pnrngould, officiating. A native of Weekly county. Tenn. Mr. Lniidruni lived there until 1882 when he went" to Greene county, lie was In the Insurance business for ninny years until he retired. Other relatives who survive him different route the same night, nre his wife, four oilier sons, II. covered 1C 01-88 miles. M. Lnndrum, of Jonesboro, R. E. Charles V. and John Landrum of Paragould. and another daughtci, Mrs. J. S. Dimavant of.Clarksdnlc, New York Cotton NEW YORK, Jan. G (UP)).—Cotton closed steady. and, of course, the members are all owners of them fancy, pedigreed dogs and they was horrified when I got up and said that I would nmeh rather have B mongrel or a unit. I never could see where the value of a dog depended on how long his ears are, how wide his nose Is, or what angle he holds his tall at I don't think you can tell Ihe value of a dog by lookln' at tlic outside. You got to get Inside of him to find his real worth. They are a whole lot like people that way. The other day I passed by a Hollywood school and I saw a terrible commotion In the school yard nnd I asked a boy what the trouble was and he says "well, a doctor Jest come here and examined all of us and one of the 'deficient' klrts Is knocktn' the tar out Simmons . 37 1-2 '''"'''" Jan. May July Oct. Dec. Oo»n High Lo W close 834 841 831 842 840 849 839 848 845 853 859 863 858 8fi4 869 872 845 853 859 863 85S 863 87Z Spots closed steady at 858, up 10. New Orleans Cotton NEW ORLEANS, Jan. 6 (UP)—' „ o tll . f CMon fu Vi res , c!os(!d s^ady today, Socony Vacuum 211-21 up 10 to , P° lnts - Advan6es were the year with a 5iibfanti.il margin of earnings over operating expenses. Votins stork in the association owned by borrowers now stands at *'1.370 as compared with last year's Mali of S8.015. Mnny substantial farmers in liiis district have adopted the production credit method of financing during the past year. Bell said, and many farmers who a vear or two n"o had oulv border-line security are now In good financial position. The largest sl?.e loans In 1937 were on cotton crops. However, an increased number of farmers arc usine production credit to finance the purchase of cattle and hogs in this territory. Annual meeting of members And election of officers will be on Tuesday. Jan. 18, at the courthou.s? In Osccoln. On the present board of directors nre P. p. Jacobs. Griclcr, R. C. Bryan, Osceola: H. C. Kfiap- Schenley Dist 151-2 Standard of N J 20 1-4 Texas Corp 42 1-2 U. S. Smelting 66 U. S. Steel 591-8 Livestock EAST ST. LOUIS, 111., Jan. G (UP)— Hogs: receipts, 11,000 Top, 8AO Heavy weights, 8.15-8.35 Light weights. 7.50-8,25 Bulk sows, 6.35-6.75 Cattle: receipts. 3,000 Steers, 6.50-7.85 Slaughter steers, 5.50-11,50 Mixed yearlings and heifers, . Slaughter heifers, 5.25-9.25 Beef cows, 5.00-6.00 6.25-7.50 Of our 'perfect specimen,'" 1 Cutters and low cutters, 3,75-4.50 made on stronger cables and bet-. ier domestic markets, plus optlm-! ism over the farm bill passage outlook. Jan. . March May 858 July 863 Oct 868 Dec 875 . . penbcrscr. Blytheville, and C S. Stevens. Blytheville. Open High LOW Close 840b 850 850 848b 850 860 850 860 868 814 878 880 853 863 875 887 874 817 875 Deficiency in Spelling Frees Erring Motorist ST. LOUIS (UP)—Police James P. Nagle dismissed a Irafric charge because the arresting off! : ccr had written "Europe'' as the Spots closed steady nt 310, up 10.. birthplace! of the defendant. The Chlcaffo Wheol he said, was too vague •'rite. •Well, where were you born," Judge Nngle asked the defendant May 93 96 5-8 93 96 1-4 after the cas was dismissed. Jul 81 1-8 90 1-8 87 1-8 89 1-8 i "In Czechoslovakia, judge." j -Didn't you tell that to the vesting officer?" Chicago Corn "Sure I did." tlio defendant re- .sliod. "But he couldn't spell il. I May 62 62 3-4 61 3-4 62 1-8'couldn't cither, so lie made it E«Jul 61 S-8 62 1-2 82 1-4 61 3- d - rope" 'Party Driving" Becomes Paying Job at College DENVER (UP)— University stu- iMils' ingenuity has created n new nethod of earning money to de- 'ray expenses. The latest wrinkle is "party driving." The "party drivers" guarantee sober driving for students on parties. Denver police have started to arrest several drivers of late whose cars were filled with singing, shouting college students, only to be checked by the explanation— "I'm a party driver." Hy WARREN C. COOPER, Uiiltfil Press Correspondent., MARION, Ark., Jan. 8 (UP)).— Nine slate troopers mid a dozen deputies guarded Ilia Crlltcnden county couvthouso today as the state moved swiftly to convict two Memphis negroes, charged -with criminal assault on a young while girl Christmas night. •••-. Armed with tear gas and sub-. machine guns tho officers searched the moro than 800 spectators who Jammed the courtroom when the trial opened at 9 a. m. A dozen officers' escorted tho two defendants, Frank Carter, 26, and Thco Thomas, 26, as they were brought Into tho courtroom. No Ueiiioaitrailon t There was no demonstration, liowovcr, during the day. Cecil B. Nance and W. B. Scott, Marlo.n law partners, were appointed by tho court to represent the negroes. Prosecuting Attorney Bruco Ivy stated the stale's case shortly before noon. H c told the jury, which Included- ono negro, that the d. fr-mlnnts beat Hie victim, tore off clothes and then assaulted, her three times. "One of the negroes tlireat'jtic<> to kill her and dump her body In tho Mississippi river after ho had ravished her," Ivy said. "The only thing that saved her from death was tho posse which frightened the, negroes away." Escort Testifies P. E. Bradlng, 22, of .Jonesboro, Mils afternoon Identified . Theo Thomas and Frank carter as; the '",'" "R3P?* who held l}lm up,;o Looting of Pig Stand On Second Police have mntle no arrest In the burglarizing ot the Royal Pig Stand Saturday night, It was announced todny by Police Chief E. A. Rice. It Is believed the thieves were several young boys. TJi Bland, wlilch Is located on South Second street, opposite the armory, was entered after the lock hud been forced. A quantity of cigarettes and cakes were stolen. Maple Wilson of Memphis were riding near the Harahan, bridge. Brndlng testified that he had been going with Miss Wilson seven months. He said the negroes asked j him for a match when they Jlrst I appeared, then pulled a knife on il_ n l ve J|him, Ho then described his cscaw ,unsuivcu nm | j| )c au |j 3 (>que n t search for Mlfe \Vllsoli. Other who testified during th<! afternoon were SI Bond, counts She's World's Richest Girt Miss. Month's Output of Mint Totals 82 Million Coins PHILADELPHIA ( 152,000.000 coins were D— About minted at the Philadelphia mint last month. Value of the coins was $3,333,805. The output consisted of 16 OGO half dollars, 2,480,303 quarters, 10,640.701 dimes, 14,756,000 nickels and 52,986,000 pennies. Branson and McClurkin Are Rotary Speakers Rolarlans heard a report of the past six months activities find nu account of the progress Arkansas IQS made In education recently, at :he weekly luncheon meeting at the Hotel Noble today. U. S. Branson, secretary, told of the activities for the half year ind W. D. McClurkin. superintendent of the city schools, discussed the. educational theme. There were seven visitors. They were: Rolarians Alden Bokcr, E. S. Crlhflcld and L. L. McDearman of Osceola, P~rcd Stafford and Frank Brunner of Marked Tree, and the Rev. George W. Patterson, recently made pastor of the First Christian church, and a non-Rotarian, W. T. Farris, of Forrest City. engineer, who exhibited a map o? the section where the attack occurred, and two brothers, Boto. and Tom Morgan, both of Memphis. Tho Morgan youths «:• members of the posse that searched for Miss Wilson after she had been taken from Eroding's car by the negroes. John claybrook, 66-year-old farmer, was the negro accepted for the Jury. The other 11 jurors were white business men and farmers of this community. To Ask Death Penalty Ivy indicated before the trial h<- would ask the death penalty of the negroes. At their arraignment 1 ,vcck he refused to accept a plea Torn the men. The attacks occurred Christmas light, when Bradlng and Miss Wilson were parked on the hlghwav just across Harahan bridge 1 fron Memphis. When the negroes approached Bradlng escaped and ran to the U. S. engineers' office to ;et help. When he returned with a posse the negroes had taken Miss Wilson and fled into the muddy botton lands near the Mississippi river Her trail was picked up ttvsrs lours later by officers who foil"'. torn bit of clothing which she hty dropped as she was being dragee- xway. Jackrabbit Hunter Nets $73 Bounty in 3 Weeks HUGO, Colo. (UP)—Henry Pal- malcer of Lincoln county, Colo.. a jnckrabbit hunter who uses a .22 caliber rifle, reported earnings of $73.23 in three weeks of hunting. Palmatcer markets the hides, receives 2'/j Percy Wright Passes State Bar Examination LITTLE ROCK, Jan. C.— Percy A. W. Wright of Blytheville was one of 10 persons who passed the semi-annual bar examinations conducted at the state capllol hero Monday and Tuesday, the state ' board of bar examiners has an- Heiress to vast fortune, Constance Corby had her choice in everything— even love. That is, until she met Bret Hardesty. What happened to her then is told in one of the most absorbing stories of the new year, a 25-chapter serial nounced. Names of j 10 were certified carcasses and receives 2'/j cents| to the clerk of the Arkansas su- bounty for each pair of ears. Last) premo court as entitled to licenses year, in n three-month period, r.e| to practice law in the stale. Forty- j shot more than 2.000 rabbits. On j four candidates took the exaniln-' one day he killed 73 anlrmls! ations. which brought him $13.75 for MO hides and collected $7.25 bounty, i He averaged slightly over anc rabbit in three shots. Wright, a graduate of Blythe- vllle high school, is temporarily employed in Caruthcrsvllle, Mo. . Begins Today On Page 4 Motor Thief Chooses Police Bandit Chaser PHILADELPHIA (UP) —Patrol men Sauters and Brown reported a number of stolen cars, including •old 93." their red-painted, radio equipped bandit chaser. The police car was taken from In front of a precinct station and abandoned in another part of the ity. The buying and selling of girls and women is still a legalized and licensed business in Tokio. WEATHER Arkansas — Fair, colder, will temperature near freezing tonight Friday fair. M.(•,.:.;•.;. s-yl Vltfn'tj— Rain ih! xfternoon and tontjht. ccil night; lowest temperature 36 to 40; Friday cloudy and mud colder. The maximum temperature hen yesterday was 57, minimum 2 clear, according to Samuel P. Nor rls, official weather observer.

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