The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 28, 1950 · Page 10
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, June 28, 1950
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Page 10
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PAGE TEN 8LYTHEV1LLE (ARK.) COUR1BR NKW1 WEDNESDAY JUNE M, 10M O ne 'A 6WW By. What's Happened to Baseball Baseball just ain't what it used to be. The good old days of occasional m>hiUers. and one-hiltcrs have long gone with the changing times. Even R three-hitter nowadays is as rare as a capitalist in Russia. The home run, which-once was .something you snw only om:e in awhile. Is now the new fad. If you can't pole one 470 feet then you arc & bum in most parks. The .250 chop hitlers are now an , old-fashioned lot. Batters prefer swinging from the heels with the fences thai have been pulled Jn to look more Inviting to the muscle boys, their tan;pls fur the night..And for a pitcher to &o the route in these try- Ing times is remarkable. There is a story no i tig around, the truth of which this column can not vouch for, that in a couple of parks the hot wnter is never turned off in the shower rooms. It's always ready for the next victim. Just what Is the ronson for this sudden change of pace In the great American prtst lime? Experts soem — to differ in opinions. Some say it's the "hopped up" ball, tint the new pellet is such a rabbit that If you look closely enough you can see it wiggle it."; ears. Others, along with manufacturers of the modern baseballs, sny that it's the present crop of pitchers. That there Just nron't any more Christy Mstthewsons nnd Waller Johnsons. The Spalding Company, which makes the official ball for Ixilh the j American and National Leagues says that there has • been no major change in the ball since the 1920's. That I today's ball is Ihe same type that Dm.y Dean and Vance .swished past Die hitlers in the good old Idays. The ball is normal In every respect, they sny ,ex- Icepl that it is being belted an, .Truman's PEPC in the south. ! If this be the case ihen maybe it is Die modern • day hurlers. Again what's the reason? Some say that •pitchers aren't given enough seasoning in the mhuji.s before they tire brought up to fiic - e the big boys, But 'what about guys like Johnny Sain, Preacher Roe, Howie Pollett, guys that have been around for some tiiui!? They come in for Steve O'Neill Keeps Red Sox Winning; 5 Straight on Road By JOK KKICIH.KK Associated Press Sporls Writer Slant Steve O'Neill, the smiling Irish man, has plenty to smile about today. He is Ihe only big league manager with an unsullied slate. Since he took over the management of the Hcd Sox last Friday following the resignation of Joe McCarthy, the Hed Sox haven't lasted defeat. SODTHKRN ASSOCIATION W I, Trt. Atlanta 48 23 .670 .000 .583 4- Undor O'Neill's guidance, Boston has turned In live straight victories. The wonder of it is that all have been wf>n on the road. That i.s where the Red Sox usually meet their Waterloo. Before O'Neill took charge, the Sox had dropped 11 of their last 13 games. O'NellJ fmd to wait iinlll the nth inning last night to rind out whether he was still unbeaten as n jiianaper this year. Two walks, ft hit batsman and singles by Al Zar- ilia ami pitcher Joe Dobson pushed across two runs in the 11th to en- rib) e Boston to defeat the Philadelphia Athletics, 7-5. Dobson had replaced starter Mel Parnell when the A's rallied for a run in the ninth lo deadlock' the scorn at 5-5. red Williams sparked the Fled their share of the shellackings, too. It just dncsn't make sense does it? Some of the managers are crying that the new balk rule has taken the last defense away from the pitcher. Thru the new one-second nilc keeps the hurlers concentrating on not balking and as a result they groove the fat one when the catcher has called for a low In.side one. Other managers are charging that pitchers aren't given enough conditioning time in the spring. That the baiters are siwuy ahead of the hurlers when training opens. They want training for pitchers to start two weeks earlier to give their moundsmcn Mine to get ready. Sonic expert. 1 ; advocate the return of the spit ball, mndball and the like. And say tlmt if they are to be left with only the fast ball nnd curve then move Hie mound back to second base to give the pitcher more time to duck. What ever the reason, baseball as it is known and loved by millions of Americans may be standing on the threshold of ruination and the deadening of (he ball, giving the pitcher another pitch, enlarging something should lie done to eliminate these football-like scnres, foe it the strike zone or making the Kincrs and DiMaggies hit without bats. Sports in Spurts Coach Jimmy Fisher, manager of Blytheville's junior Legion Cotton Pickers, Is looking lor games for his kids. Jimmy says he wilt piny nny team, including some of the independent nines, within a reasonable radius. Incidently, Jimmy's juniors are doing all right with a 3-3 record against some of the stronger teams of the inoa...John Paul Hutcher&on, the Chicks' line sophomore etui of hist year who gave up football for an Hrrny career, is home on'leave this week. John is with the paratroopers.. .Here's some good argument for television. While New York «nd Brooklyn arc yelling that TV Is hurling them at the gate, Detroit, is of last Sunday, reports n little better than 100.000 increase in attendance, over last year. And all the Tigers' home games, except Sunday engagements, are televised... .Nine former members of th Camden Krnfts- men, one of the state's top semi-pro teams, are now playing organized tall, one-of them in the. majors. The big leaguer Is Joe Adcock, Cincinnati first baseman.. .Harry Brecheen. St. Louis Cardinal lefty, ranks Carl Furlllo, Jackie Robinson and Sid.Gordon as the roughest rightlmnd hitters In the National League. And Don Newcombc, the Dodgers' Negro ace, thinks Stan Musial is the toughest southpaw swinger in the league. Stan, by the way, is big Newk's "idol" Headline: (from the St. I-ouis Cardinal News) "July 4 Weekend Another Feature of Stay at Home". The way the Cards have been going lately there'll probably be a lot of Red Bird fans do just that- Quote, Unquote Dick Kleiner, sports columnist for (he Newspaper Enterprise Association: "Houston of the Doublc-A Texas League has signed a Texas A and M outfielder, Wally Moon. He'll see service In night games.... American Tennis Beauties in Brf-itish Championship Shun Fashion Frills By CHARLES WHITING WIMBLEDON, England, June 28. (AP)—American beauties on display in the British tennis championship are showing the crowds that their tennis rackets are not merely props for pretty pictures. The gals are playing sharp, crowd-pleasing tennis. Also, they are going about their Runs Scarce In Southern; Only 18 Scored By The Assorlalcrf Press Pitchers must have had their hands on a batch of sodden baseballs in the Southern Association last nl^ht. A full program of games prod need only 18 runs—low for the year for four game,';. Only one home run was hit and one triple among 59 hits. If 12 doubles had not bounced around in outfields, another 1950 season record would go in the bonks reading "most powerless ni^ht of the year.' Birmingham and New Orleans pirtycd the wildcst affair—a milt: 6-3 victory for Eirmiii^rnm. Atlanta and Mobile met in ; ho quietest, a 1-0 shutout victory for Atlanta. The evening's record shutout, a rarity but tint quite n record,! was won by Nashville 4-0 over I Memphis. Chattanooga struck th.pl medium with a 3-1 victorv over I Ultle Rock. " j Fred Taylor, Chattruionga'5 newi flrsl baseman, pot the only homer of the night and the only homer of his professional life. The triple was a Fred Hattield blo\v for Birmingham. Houston About to Give Up Idea Of Buying Browns Franchise .Sox's 10-hll attack, knocking in [id more soiully than I two runs on three hits, hi.s 22nd home rims and two doubles. The victory boosted the Sox lo within one gdinc of the third place Cleveland Indians who dropped a 4-3 tieci-sion to the St, Louis Drowns. Tigers Win Again Host on, however, failed to pain i the American League leading Detroit Tigers who rallied for five rims En the sixth inning to defeat the Chicago White Sox, 9-3. The seen ml place New York Yankees, beaten by Washing ton's Senators, 4-3 in 12 Innings, fell four and half games behind Detroit. The Philadelphia Phillies took over first place in the National .eague race, replacing Brooklyn which dropped to third. A seventh inning two-run homer by Dtck SIs- lor earned the PhMs a 3-2 triumph ove r Bostoi i a ] i d ga ve them a .003 percentage point lead of the St. Louis Cardinals. The 'Red Birds thrashed the Chicago Cubs hi both ends of mi afternoon doubleheader, -'i and 4-1. , The Dodgers fell two notches hi absorbing a 10-3 lacing by the York Giant*. It marked the first time the Giants have been able to win from the Dodgers, who have come out on top hi tour previous tilts, Cincinnati trounced Pittsburgh, 8-3, to round out the National League Schedule. Detroit's Ted Gray yielded only five hits as he posted his second triumph in three days nnd his ninth of the season. Shortstop Johnny ilpon's triple off Ray Scarborough. with the bases loaded highlighted the big sixth. VernoiTs Homer Wins Mickey Vernon's three-run homer in the top of the 12Lb was the decisive blow in Washington's third victory over the Yankees In five meetings this season. The Yankees rallied for two runs In their half of the 12th, but relief pitcher Mickey Harris "got Phil Rtezulo to hit into n game-ending double play. Home runs by Dtck Kokas and Don Lenhardt, each with a man on baacJniin'-d Bobby Feller's bid for h!rf;2qOlh major league triumph. Curt. Simmons allowed seven hits to Warren Spahn's three, but the Philadelphia southpaw won his ninth game on the strength of Sls- Icr's four-bagger. Lar ry Jn use n sa w his scor eless pitching; streak stopped after 30 consecutive rimless innings but went on to hold Brooklyn to six hits for his eighth triumph, six of them in a row. A two-run homer by Roy Campanella in the second ended his skein. The Curds got superlative pitching from lefthanders Howie E'olleL and Max Lanier. Each won his seventh game. Pollet allowed eight hits in the opener and Lanier scattered five hits In the nightcap. Virgil Stnllcup drove in three Cincinnati runs on three successive singles as Hcrm Wehmeier picker! up his fifth win at the expense of the hapless Pirates. (Second En a series of stories np- praising the cities now bidding for the major lenyue baseball franchise of the St. r/)Uls Browns.1 By DICK I'KKKMAN Sporis Kill tor Houston Chronicle (Written for HIP Associated Press) HOUSTON, June 28. <A'j—When Bill DeWitt of the St. Louis Browns dropped a few name* in St. Lont.s the other day — uanics of cities which are interested in buying the franchise of the Browns—tbere wasn't too much Interest awakened! In Houston, Houston was mentioned as one of (he cities "Interested" in buying the franchise. It all started a little more than a year af;o, nnd it never has gained any momentum. ATI ea.stcrn representative of a financial newspaper is believed responsible for the "feeler." He went to Allen Russell, president of the Texas League Houston Buffs, and a.sked him a lot of n lt rations about the finuncEai set-up involved in moving a major league team to Houston. South'sJ»rBRe.sl City After all, he said, Houston is a fast growing city and the biggest citv In the south. He said he could get tlie capital, some from Houston, some from the east. Russell doesn't rvcn remember his name The project was dropped nf(er he went into the following problems, each one Involving a mil- IJon or so. or maylie n fraction: First, there would be the purchase of the territorial rights of the Texas League in Houston— estimated anywhere from 5500,000 to $1.000,000. Second, there would ho the purchase of the Buff* franchise. Russell wouldn't discuss that, but the Buffs have done right well by the St. Louis Cardinal system in recent years, cTnIm* plenty of money. Nru* Stadium Needed Third, there would he the purchase of Buff stadium, and lhat would Uikc around $1.500,000. Fourth, there would be the necessity of increasing caundtv from 11,717 to at least 30.000. and that would mean n new stadium. Fifth, (hen: would he Ihe purchase of the Browns* franchise and players in St. Louis, and that wouldn't be liay. Then there would come thn Job of buying players of caliber to compete in the American League, which the Browns of the'1950 edition aren't doing too well. All in nil. It looks like a de.ici duck as far as the present is concerned, Trans-Miss Meet Enters Second Round OMAHA, June 28. (/i 1 ) _ Along about sundown today there will be 32 golfers whose championship hopes haven't been shattered in the Trans- MKsissippi Tournament, S°coud round activity at the G,827 yard Happy Hollow Course involved 61, ambitious shooters who came I throush the opening day yesterday with victories or by default or byes. lly nicjhlfall the field, which lacks an mitftandini; favorite to succeed to the throne vacated hv Charles coe of Ardmore, Okla., will be trimmed lo 32. First off the stnrling tee today v,-as Johnny Kraft of Denver, seeded No, I. The little schoolmaster was matched \vtth F.t\ O'Dea of Lincoln. Nebr., recipient of a first round bye. Kraft, who won the 1942 title, didn't stroke like a champ as he got 3 1 up decision over Jim Johnston of Waunetii, Neb., who registered out of Gooclland, Kas. Kraft was one of 10 seeded players who made first round appearances. Three of the seeded performers were toppled. Burnett Beats Wade Lee; Ark-Mo Takes Razorback Hilly Denton, Burnett Hudson Pacemakers ace wha has two no-hit games to his credit this season, hurled hi« KCcoml one-hitler in a row last nighl as the Pacemakeri ine-y without any of the fashion frills introduced last year by Gertrude (Gorgeous Giuvyr) Moran of lace panfie.s fame. Maybe it's hecau.sc the championship committee has laid down the law about uncoilventiona! dress. A notice in the vvomt'if.s drewilng room says "white dress will be worn on the court, during play." Gnssic Wears White There had been some talk that MLjs Mora.ii mi^ht repeat her performance of wearing the black shorts with which she -shocked Cairo court circle* Jn.st winter. But so far the Santa Monica, Calit., girl and her compatriots have avoided any extreme .stylos. Gussy appeared yesterday wear- ins; a white tailored, sleeveless blouse with white shorts. The [aiis might have been disappoint crl with her ccvstumc but they couldn't find much fault with her game. Slip toyed \vith n Swedish opponent. Miss Ln^rrbor;.* to advance to the third round in straight sets. Ail .seven .seeded American men. headed by New York's Billy Tal- berl, readied, the round of 32 without any narrow squeaks, The only casuall yw.i.s unheeded Tony Tra- berl of Cincinnali, who lost to Hritain's Tony Mottram. Doubles were .scheduled today. Britons Called Lawless LONDON — M'j— Dr. A. L. Goodhart, a New Yorker who teaches jurisprudence at. Oxford University, says that on the highways this country "is one of the most lawless in Ihe world because its traffic laws are inadequate." He told the Pedestrians' Association at its annual meeting here. "If deaths per 100,000 vehicles are compared. America's ratio is 71 to Britain's 163 a yeaj." NATIONAL LEAGUE W 1, Philadelphia 35 24 3t. Louis 36 Brooklyn 34 Boston 32 New York SO Chicago 29 Pittsburgh . ... Cincinnati . ... 22 21) Pi-l. SD3 ,53J .586 -533 508 .500 .3S1 .333 Yesterdav's Results Southern Association Chattanooga 3, Little Rock 1 Atlanta 1. Mobile 0 Nashville 4, Memphis 0 Birmingham 6, New Orients 3 blanked the Wade l.ee Cotton Company nine game of a th« fi .-*. City Softball League doubleheadcr at + Pai-k. In the second game of last night'* twin hill the Ark-Mo Kllowattera got five hit pitching from Herb Holmes and rolled to a 14-4 deci- over the winle.is Raxorbaclu of the Razorback Drive-In. Denton faced only 24 batters, three over (he minimum, in the seven Inning lid lifter. He gave iip'twcr bases on balls, allowed one single, and one Lee batter was safe on an National l.tagw St. Louis 3-4, Chicago 2-1 New York 10, Brooklyn 3 CEnnntE fl, Pittsburgh :i Philadelphia 3. Boston 2 American l.«-agiie Washington 4, New York 3 (12 innings) Boston 7, Philadelphia 5 (11 in- netroit fl, Chicago 3 St. Lonis 4, Cleveland 3 City Parks Plan First Plav Day At David Acres The first annual play day for play tennis of Blythevil'c's parks will be held Friday afternoon at David Acres Pail:, ..). P. Ciarrolt.. Y director, said today. Members of loams from Blylrn- villc's playgrounds win assemble at Ihe David Acres Park for an afternoon of competition In nil types of playeround activity. Mr. Garrott .said. All children 15 years of a; and under are Invited to take part. There will be competition in horse shoes, paddle tennis, sack racing, baseball throw, zell ball and a iium- W of ot!-er playground games. Mr. Oarrott said, with each park to enter a team in each event, Mr. Garrotl stated that the play di-v is to be held on an experimental basis and the number of games will be restricted. Plans are to make play day an annual affair, he said The play day will be a part of the Y's summer recreation program and will be under the immediate .supervision of Mr. Garrott. He will be assisted by the various park directors. Mr. Garrott stated that the children wilt he divided into age Groups for trie competition. Boys will be placed in three age groups. 10 and under, 11-is and M-15. Oirls will be placed info only (wo groups, 11 and under and 12 and over. Paragould HuHer Pitches Perfect Game for Toledo error. lie ihrew Ihe third strike past five hitters. The Pacemakers gel to L. W. Filz- for 10 hits including a fifth Inning homer by Billy Wixson. A. C. Bunch got'two hits in three times at bat to !ea<! the assault. Easley got the lone hit for the Lee team. A six run outburst in Ihe sixth inning iced things for the Kilowat- tcrs who coasted home behind Holmes' fine pitching. The Kilowatters got 19 hits off A. G. Moslcy, six of them in the big sixth inning. Buck Roush hit for the circuit for Ark- Mo. Stewart and Roush led Ark-Ma's hitting v:ith each getting three hits in five iinie.s at bat. The Uazorback's Jive hits were evenly divided among five players. ^^ Last night's games were tli^Wrst of second half play in the league. Play is to continue tomorrow night wllh another twin bill. Tomorrow night's schedule will send Blytheville Motor against Montgomery Ward and the Jaycecs against Sullivan- TOLEDO. June 28. (.T)—Toledo's Marlin Henry SUlart, :)i-year-old Arkansan, today owns the second perfectly pitched game in American Association history. Stuart, down a little more than ing for 20 put-outs, a month from the Detroit Tigers, faced only 27 Indianapolis batters in a "dream" no-hUti'r si.s the Mud Hens nipped the league-leading Tribe, 1-0, at Swayne Field in Toledo. The 6-foot. 2-inch right-hander from ParflKOUld, Ark., walked none and received errorless support from his mates. Stuart, struck out only three, but got the jump on every batter with a tricky knuckle ball and slider. Only four balls were'hit to the outfield, the InfieEd account- ' Today s Games Southern Association .Memphis at Nashville night Birmingham at New Orleans night Atlanta at Mobile night Little Hock at Chattanooga night National Leacuc New York at Brooklyn Philadelphia at Boston St. Louis at Chicago Cincinnati at Pittsburgh American League Chicago at Detroit Washington at New York Cleveland at St. Louis night Boston at Philadelphia night Mead's Trounce Saliba in BWL Mend's Timers scored six runs in HID last half nf the filth Inning to clown the Frcci S. Saliba Company team 11-10 in a Day Window League The Luokout*' victory over thr j hapless t?ocV.s ended a nine-came losing slrpak. Knrltar in the season Chattanooga lost nine others in a row. iLOANS CARS, TRUCKS Real Ksme ,t FU* 1 United Insurance Agency A. f lUccl Dietrich, Isl i Main—Krar CilJ Blvll.rvillr Ark Urns Minister 'Lore Theft' Suit Against Joe Louis CHICAGO, June 2fi. tfT>— A minister's $500,000 love theft suit against ex-heavy weight ehampion Joe Louis tins been dropped. Lawyers for Louis and; the Rev. Matthew C. Faulkner. 33, Negro, announreri yesterday that terms of au uut-of-court settlement would not, be told. The former Atlanta. On., pastor's alienation of affections sviit was dismissed In circuit court. The minister, now a Chicago resident, charged I he boxer stole the love of his wife, a New York model, the former Mattie Carolle Drn^e. The Rev. Faulkner has filed, suit for divorce, naming Louis as co-respondent, and charging that his wife committed adultery several with Louis. The case is lo he heard Friday. game at Little Park. Phil Koury hurled for the SMibas and was charged with the loss. Herb Chllds worked for Mead's ami got credit for the win. This afternoon Phil Applcbaum's team was scheduled to play Burnett Hudson Sales. FREE WASH JOB When You Have Your Car Greased and Oil Changed. Chamblin Sales Co. R.R. and Ash Phone 6888 YOUR FRIENDLY- 1 MAGNOLIA DEALER Shirley Hipp Office Phonr. 4091 Residence Phone 740 Bljlhrvilte BILL GODWIN SPORTING GOODS Swim IVunks 2.!I5. Tennis Hnqucts Caps of all kinds limmie "B" Boats |50 Baseball &- Softball Uniforms, all prices, lettering All types Summer Ath- Icic Equipment. 'If it's Sporting Goods, See Us." W. Main Ph. 6762 Rent A Car . .. Drive It Yourself Fresh Crappic Chicken Dinner Package Deliver}- Any when Simpsons Cafe STATE LINE Phones .(9.18 - 9:17 WE BUY AND SELL USED & NEW FURNITURE PHONE 2112 Truck! E .TBD here are twelve mighty important engineering and construction features that insure long life and lo\v maintenance in a truck. Only truck-built GMC'i give yon all twelve! No other make offers more than six — some only one or two! Don't be fooled by claims—look underneath the paint. If you want a real truck that will give you most miles per dollar, use this check list to measure up truck values. Remember, all these extra-mileage features arc standard equipment on a GMC—there's no extra charge for them. You can carry bigger loads safsly on WHERE TO S£5 THE NEW SIG-VALUt CMC TtUCKS ft frtater fumling frofiti HORNER-WILSON MOTOR CO. 309 East Main — Phone 2056

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