The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 31, 1936 · Page 1
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 1

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BLYTHEVILLEl COURIER NEWS . THE DOMINANT NEWSPAPER 01'' NORTHEAST ARKANSA^ AND SOUTI1BAOT MISSOURI ' 1 T VOL. XXXIII—NO. 2-15 Blythevllle Courier ' Blythevllle Dally News BlyllievJUe Herald' Mississippi Valley Leader BLYT1IEV1LLE, ARKANSAS, THURSDAY, DECKM1MK 31, 1030 SINGLE COPIES ILS; PROSPERS EM America .Wit Spend Millions in Welcoming the JNew Year /Forecasts Better Than Normal Business Throughout the Year Ahead AS IIAKSON SEES i9sv BUSINESS: £ight Per Cent Gain For Year CONGRESS: Will Not Be Harmful To-Business ;- REAL. ESTATE: Sharp Improvement—Rents Higher BUILDING: Boom In New Homes Year's'Feature: STRIKES: Possibility Of Grave Labor Troubles' : LABOR: Higher" : Wages And More Jobs FARM PRICES: Spotty—Total Farm Income Higher LIVING COSTS: Clothing to , Lead sharp Advance : RETAIL TRADE: Big Year- Best Since 1929 ADVERTISING: Boost Quotas .Ten To.Twenty Per Cent STOCKS: Higher'But Good Selection Vital,. - ;. BONDS: ' At Ceiling—Watch Money Policy FOREIGN: No European War In 1837 . , -•:•" SUMMARY-'First Year Of 'Prosperity Since 1020 By !ROGEB w. BABSON BABSON. ; P. ARK, Mass. — I predict that 1937 .will be. our first year of real prosperity' since 1929 It will .be a year of genuine business - expansion, considerable real estate activity, constant labor troubles,, shortages of- skilled .workers, lising prices and living costs, and brisk -retail trade. Near!} everj line will enjoy good gains in both volume and profits with the hea\y industries showing the greatest percentage Improvement Tuik. this forecast 'away for -a, chfcck^ip*' next "December and I predict that you will-find genera' business around 8 pei cent abo\e ut at noon today's figures and- not -'-far from the 1929 peaks! • Business at Normal A year.ago at, this time my forecast was: "By next Christmas gen- p eral' business, as measured by the 'Babsonchart, sliould be hugging.the 'X-Y' Normal Line and heading into another period of prosperity." Statistically, that is exactly where business Is today, we are right square on normal! For. tile .first .time in fourteen jears, we are, crossing the "X-Y" Normal Line • on . the way into a new; prosperity era. A moment'? retrospect shows the tremendous distance that we have coyered since we touched bottom in March, 1933 The total gam in business has been 78 per cenII Nearly a third of this rise' has come during 1936 alone! 1936 Remarkable Year''.'•••',. The year just:closed has been a remarkable one in many ways While it is generally believed thai elections do not..change the basic • course of business, most, analysts ' concede that they are temporarily upsetting. The tide of recovery was running so strong in 193G, however that it swept over every obstacl and washed out the old year in a burst of glory: There are^scarcaly any figures or record that can match 1936's steads gains' In. jobs,- payrolls, industria activity, profits, and dividends. Top ping off the year w : as a j real post election , boom. Wave after wav of wage, boosts and bonuses an dividend increases and extras lift ed Christmas trade back to old time, levels. EiRht Per Cent Gain for 1937 The momentum picked up by Oil surge of buying'will'carry into th New Year. Business in 1936 Eood. Business In 1937 will be bet ter.-My estimate Is for a 10 pe cent gain In the first six month over the initial half of 1936. It harder'.to make a definite predic tion for the second half, but think a'5 per cent gain over the closing months of the old year Is within reason. This would put my Babsoncharl j Index about 5 per cent above nor-' P-y United Press America will open its' noc'ket- bcoks tonight \yith a prosperily 'Icurish to greet the new'year with as lavish a display as it has seen •Ince hilarious 1929. New Yorkers will spend $10,000,"3';. Kansas City elite will dine on imported English pheasant, Lcx- .ngton, Ky., will give a. birthday parly for a horse. A survey by (lie United Press rhowed that from coast to coast mere money will jingle over the counters of night clubs.: liquor stores and hotels than at any lime since - the depression 'sobered would-be celebrants. New York topped the'list with an estimated outlay of $10,000,000 (cr celebrations in hotels, night clubs mid homes. Philadelphia "igurcd io spend $7.000,000; Chi customers to contribute their share to a New Year's eve purse approaching $1,500,000..A half nii!- llon celebrants.will.usher the new year In around the" movie colony. Washington expected to contribute $1,000.000 , to. the cause; Cleveland, $500,000; Columbus, O.. $100.000; New; Orleans, $400,000; Birmingham, . $100,000; Dallas $200,COU; San Francisco and Kansas City, $100.000; 'Cincinnati $225,000; Louisville, $75,000. Even Albany, N. Y., had $40,000 to sj»nd; Tulsa, $30,000; Memphis, $30,OM; Atlanta,. $25000. and Little Rock 520,000. One city after another reported complete sell-out of hotel par- tics, dinners and entertainments. Prices ran • to $12.50 a person In Chicago, not to mention the liquor. Los Angeles and Hollywood offered a similarly arid $15 ticket Washington and London Ransom Cash Discovery Is Unconfirmed SOUTH AMBOY, N. J., Deo, 31 (UP)-Gov. Harold O. Hoffman sald-al his home here today :that lie. knew nothing of the -'reported Pays $28,000 T -. r , . .„ , (recovery of $21,050 hi gold nole>. IreallCS LXDlie at Mid- which was said by tho Phlla- night Tonight cago, perhaps $4,000,000; ' Detroit, :2,Oltt.OOO. . i and in New Orleans the cover Los Angeles and Hollywood ex-1 charges ran to $20 with a solid pected Rose Bowl football g'nnu booking. CLOSED 27,000 Employes Out of Jobs as a Result of La- ;bor Troubles DETUO1T, Dec. 31. <UP>—Workers in three plants of vast General Motors Cor|ioration went oil strike today, increasing .the nnni- er of. shut-downs in G. M. fac- wies to nine and throwing an es- mated 27,000 employes out of jobs The corporation disclosed Its sub- diary, the Guide Lamp Co had losed its Anderson, Ind,, plant oday after 200 of the ,2,300 day hift^emplojes had staged a sit- owil strike, Aj! Norvtood, O, 2000 emplojes f the Fisher Body and Chevrolet ivisions of General Nfolors walked "There lias been no explanalion f these' acts, .no demands niade pon the company," a General Moors official/told the United Press. The new strikes occurred as the utomobile industry shut down its ong assembly : lines for the New fear's holiday. Automotive oiserv- fflELKE SHIES Arkansas \Vorkers Among Those Ineligible for Job Insurance WASHINGTON,'Dec. 31. (UP) — Twelve states and two territories failed today to meet the federal year-end deadline for cooperating with the government's new program of protecting the., nation's wage earners against poverty in lime of unemployment. They were:' ^Arkansas, Florida. Georgia, Illinois,'Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Washington, Wjoming, Alaska and Hawaii , rt .The laws of two states Delaware and Kentucky, arc up for last Inln- (ite apprqyal by., ttie.social security, board' today '.,"-' The penalty for non-compliance, and the lioard'ivas unrelenting In enforcing it, is two-fold 1 These statcs'will be kept from sharing in the estimated $150,000,000 fund collected:'in"1936 from -a one per. cent' federal employers' payroll .tax, assessed to finance: the dclphla Record to be part of the Lindbergh ransom money. 'I thought," the governor said, LONDON, Dec. 31 (UP) —;The,'."thai the federal bureau of In- Voshlngton navnl limitation trca-| vcsllgallon and the former: head y, restricting building In batllc- :hlps, and tile London tieaty! re- itrlctliig cruisers and other, lurx- llary ships, expire at midnight to- ilglit and leave the world fa'cliig he threat of a naval race. ! 6t the state police, Col. H. Nor- niaii.,Schwarzkopf, had closed tho "I thought they said -all the Lindbergh .money had been found. r'dOn't know anyllilng about the Pkis Call for Ultimate Inclusion of Cotton and Com WASHINGTON, Dec, 31 (UP)— 'Iho federal government already i the Insmance companj In Tomorrow morning workmenjitory or the report" re, surveying the acute 'labor situa- ', anti-depressIon '''plan. ion, believed > the long week-end voilid bring the "zero hour" in la xr's battle for recognition irt this ipen shop; industry. .-' - . Walkouts In ; the General Motors divisions ."followed by'a few hours he-shut down'of the -Number One Fisher Body plant at Flint, Mich. Foiir thousand'workers on the as-' 'embly line ; of the nearby Bnlck factory .were sent home when cars could not te completed becausa of * .ck of bodies. 2. Industrial:'.'and 'commercial workers'lii'these states Will be ineligible for unemployment compensation'-until the.states pass.legisla- tion providing for thein. About 5,000,000 workers, approximately 20 per cent of all wage earners in the country, will be affected.. ..;•'* .All other states "and the District of Columbia will receive credit in the United States' treasury for 90 per cent -of the money their employers' pay in to : the 'Jobless-'aid fund. If any of .their" workers eligible for the'plan-are thrown out of work through no fault o'f lliejr own they will receive weekly benefit* ranging from]'a $5 minimum lo a $15 maximum and government aid in finding new jobs. • . : fttes at Caruthersvilfe for FerreH A. Downing CARUTJTERSVILLE, Mo. — Funeral services for Ferrell. Allen Downing, 52, were held Wednesday afternoon at the H. S. Smith Funeral Chapel, with the Rev. W. L. Meyer, pastor of the Methodist church, conducting the services. Interment was at Little Prairie cemetery. Mr. Downing came to Carulh- ersville from Blytheville, Ark., about five years ago and was employed as butcher.' nt the West End grocery until ill health'forc- ed him to retire several months ago..Six months ago he was tak-1 „ ,, ,. .. ,, , . en to a sanatorium at Mt. Vernoii f P " rchas<:tl tllcJblc J'<:'e but, his sus where it . was reported only re-' P' cion ?- ar .° used - scnt another centlylhat he was making splcn- j did "progress. ' j ' ,. |M Besides Ills widow" he is survived by four children, James, of Tuisa, Okla., and Raymond, Mary Beryle \n\ la> down the keel plates foi two. British battleships of 35,000 tons,..each with a battery 'of a new deadly: type of 14-lncli guns, majesty's ship, King George V at llie Vlckcrs' aims works and H. M. s. Prince of Wales nt Cammell Laird's at Biikenhead. A^set for Training. , In addition, the old ships provide hulls In which to train Uhe navy personnel which -will be • required for the new ships now on the wajs In shlpjards of c\ei> one of the big naval powers. The start of the scramble.to retain o\er age tonnage was signaled 'by the British government by Invoking Die escalator clause oi the London Naval Treaty which permitted anj of the signatorj governments to - retain such tonnage "by notifying the olhcr powers of Oils Intention Britain notified: the Unlled slates and Japan that it proposed keeping 40,000 tons of old destrojers which lothenUse were scheduled foi scrapping before Dec. 31. The United slates "reluctantl'i gave notice that .this country would retin a like amount of aging de stroyers japan followed suit, but .divided Its retained tonnage br tween destroyers' arid submarines. .Thereupon the Unlled States ie- \clded to keep a number of ove*'^(je submarines due for scrapping > ~Recently 'the'sntlsh "govermilenl gave notice that'll would retain five old cruisers scheduled for scrapping The United States has n hand no over r agc cruisers, bu't tificd other government tliat nerica w-oiild retain 19,000 adrii- onal' tons of old destrojers Fortifications Race Due The questio nof new farllflcat- ons in Ihe Pacific has not yet ecn formally opened. Admmlstra- on officials repeatedly have d°- ared tbftt the .united States does intend to initiate a fortifica- ons construction race, but that if her powers undertake construe- on-of fortifications. In the area striated by the Washington Arms "reaty, the United states .will an- er fortification with fortlflca- A step in this direction has been commended by lhe : U. s. Army "ngineers on rivers and harbsrs ork. Tlie/ have recommended e'x- tnditure .of $1.000,000 on Wake sland and $500,000 on Midway sland In the Pacific to Improve he seaplane harbors at those Lwo lands While the work is tntcnd- The story -In the Record satd that the money had, been found n "a bag" by New .Jersey state Uoopcrs assigned to the case bj Hoffman and lliat Hoffman would leveal details of the discovery today and name "the acliial kid- napeis' of the Llndbcigh baby, foi who.se abduction Bnmo Rich- aid Haupt.nann died in the ctcc- Irlc chah POPE ILL rliystcian Consents Despite Pontiffs Seuous Illness 'he woild, lodaj planned n $2,00!\OW,000 annual crop insurance Dictum!! !o lochido c\eiitiiiilly lotion, coin and wheat President Roosevelt's crop Insurance coimnlllon which recommended a f6dcial piogram In 1D38 foi wheat has gathered dala foi slmllai Insmnnco of cotlun and corn, the : other two of the three iirlnclpal cixips. Mr. Roosevelt Is expected lo Fend Ihe 'committee's fcanimontl- atlons lo COIIBICSS eaily in Ihu session with a lallon Scmitoi Ida) said, he would muo 1)111 to Insure wheal "at llic earll- '<'. ""ssible moiiient,' Pcumlniciil of agiloiiltnrc officials cooiKintlng with Iho li'sin- nncc commlltee, have gulhcicd da|a on collon and coin for In clu'toti In Ihe piogram If congicss 'Ic'-lres Should llic po\ciiinient wrlle Insurance foi all wheat, collon 'ind corn giown in the Unlled Slates It v,outd ha\c an annual 'ilsk' of $3000000.000 It Is estimated, howc\ci, onlj about two out of cverj three farmer', would Imnre. The government under President Roosevelt's administration already VATICAN CITY, Dec 31 (UP) —Pope Phis XI, despite his ailments, plans to listen lo New Year's , , , midnight mass in his bedroom and s cntcie(1 tlle Insurance business take holy communion later it was " " '" rBe 6cftlc ll 'nsures bank 1 ' ccounk up lo $5000, loans on ionics and faiias, lives of world tar \cterans and social sccuillv nsuiance cohering aecd, blind and lemployed. Bicycle Is Recovered When Sale Is Attempted A bicycle, owned by Phil and Jack Bishop, stolen Tuesday night, was recovered yesterday and the thief, Robert Johnson, 18, was arrested. The negro attempted to sell the " " • man. The latter . |i '"'' - he d " e l >art - and Peggy Wyatt, of this city. His molher, Mrs. Matilda. Downing, and two brothers,' Dave Downing of Ceiitralia, Ili., and Robert EWwning of Flint, Mich., also' survive, as does one grandchild. The bicycle was Identified as one -•" from the Bishop youths whi! ing a scout meeting Tuesda night. The negro youth was lakci into custody and all but 50 cents of the purchase : money recoveret mal by the Fourth of and ap- preaching 10 per cent over normal by nexl Christmas. The entire year's gain should average, about 7 to 8 ner cent above 1936. Business will be above Ihe X-Y Unpin other words, In a prosperity era —for the first .entire twelve month period since 1929! Unless— Labor Holds the \Vliip-Hanrt It Is seldom that there is no "unless". 1930 was an exception. Then there was no "but" to my bullishness. Today, however, there is, one major question in my mind—the labor problem. If this issue Is not handled properly, business could re- ,:ceive a very rude set-back, Workers are In^the most strategic position today they have ever held. Labor leaders can .lie prosperity (.Continued from page six.) rather of Dr. Harwell Suffers Paralytic Stroke ,OSCEOLA.-^Dr. o. M. Harwell received word yesterday lhat his father, L. B. Harwell, had suffered a stroke of paralysis while visiting in the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. H. Keathley at Dyer, Tenn. • Mr. Harwell makes his home In Osceola with his son but was spending the • Christmas holidays with Mrs. Keathley and family. Dr. and Mrs. Harwell left Ihls morn- Ing for Dyer, accompanied by Ihelr son, Mallory, who' will go on to Nashville to meet his sister, Miss Catherine Harwell, reluming from a visit with Mrs. Mike Parrlsh in Knoxvllle, Tenn; Lincoln Highway Crowded CHEYENNE, Wyo. <UP)_A driv '. | to route through traffic arounu cities and town' in Wyoming ha been started by James B. Tr ue the slate highway superintcnden Pointing to the daily traffic a more than 1.000 cars on the Lin coin highway, 'True urged "by pass" roads around urban centei to relieve congestion hi the busl ness districts. Chicago Wheat open high -low do May 136 1-2 137 135 t-8 136 i Jill 110 1-4 119 7-8 118 1-4 118 1 Chicago Corn open high • low clo May 108 1-8 108 7-8 108 108 1 Jill 104 3-8 105 1-8 104 3-8 105 7 Said authoritatively at the Vatlcar late today Prof Amantl Mlianl, the Pope's! phjslclan, \lslted him this evening and found,, the pontiff A'cdnrtltion satisfactory after a qulH day o7 est <• ,i - < • , "The Papa asked If he might hear mass at- midnight and Mlianl ns- sentcd ' The mass will be read by one of he Popes two prhate secretaries A'ety York Cotton NEW YORK, Dec 31 (UP) _ Cotton closed steady. • open high low close •Jan 1248 1250 1242 1244 .larch 1247 1250 1235 1240 day 1238 1239 1223 1229 July ' 1220 1230' 1218 1221 Oct. 1191 1193 H81 1184 Dec 1196 1197 1185 1188 Spots.closed steady at 1300, off New Orleans Cotton NEW ORLEANS?, Dec. 31 (UP)— Cotton closed steady. open high low 'close •d primarily lo improve the service f the Pan-American Clipper ships n transpacific air and passenger ervice, which use those islands' as anding stations, the improvements •ouldlhave considerable military nd naval value In time of war by royiding seaplane harbors for war lanes. 'Japan has carried on improve- nent work for years In the har- ors of the Pacific islands mandated to It by the League, of Nylons. These improvements, while vowedly of commercial character or merchant shipping, could ivti >e used as submarine bases in time if war In the PScific. Tlie lapse of these treaties wil nove the hands of the clock back o 1921 and reopen the Pacific Ocean as a Happy Hunting Ground for militarists and "big navy" advocates of three or more nations. It will open the door for the inauguration of another inler- nalional race In • naval construc- ,ion; for competition In construction of fortifications in the Pacific and for a test of sea-power Ihe Far East. Some phases of the anticipated naval construction race already have begun. Great Britain has announced the intention of constructing two new 35,000 ton battleships manned by 14-inch guns. It Is generally believed that Japan will constnict two such ships, and American naval officials have all plans drawn for two new dread- naughts lo replace some of the.- aging and over-age battleships which form the now grizzled "first tine of sea defense" of Ihe American navy. Jan March May July Oct Dec 1245 1244 1233 1220 1190 1197 1240 1246 1236 1224 1192 1200a - 1230 1232 1222 1214 1181 1237b 123G 1227 1218b 1182 1189b Spots closed sleady at 1280, off five, Closing Stock Prices A T and T American Walenvorks Anaconda Copper Bethlehem Steel . .. Chrysler Cities Service' Coca Cola General American Tank General Electric . General Motors International Harvester McKesson-Robblns . Montgomery; Ward . . New York Central Packard . ..... Phillips Petroleum .. : . Radio Corp St. Louis-San Francisco Simmons Bed . . Standard of N J . ... Studebakcr Texas Corp U S Smelting .. U S Steel- Warner Bros zonito Di Hill HERE to havo paid (ho $28,000 ansom demanded by Iho kidimpo of his 10-jcar-old son, Chailcs EXPECTED Three Face Cai uthei sville Comt foi Chiislmas Eve Knifing OARUTHERSVILLE Mo, Dec 11—Wllli the heai Inn moved from the office of A. Elliott local mag- Istiatc, lo the circuit.court room lo accommodate a crowd of ap-' pioMmalely COO Spectators, three m"n .charged with; muidci In the fntnl'-'btOblng of Lel^oy 'Johnson, 31, dt a Oeeilng damie hall Christmas n\o night, were,to Ue i ; alhei Mates Mysterious Night Tiip in Old * ' mobile TACOMA Wash, Dcq 31 <,UP>'| —A soiuce close to the Malison, family told the Unlled Press today thivt pi, William Mattson haSj.. paid ft lie $20,000 Vaniom for the J iclinn ot his kidnaped fan] I Clunk's, 10 iThe ^source said'tho "I family expected Ihe boy to be ic- lurncd hbine shortly'" , ( /"-,* Payment of the <ransom was not ' conflimed Immediately ^frorti official sources. , vx , "It was not learned whethcrJDr. MatUon dealt' directly with-the' kldnftpci ''who carried Cliorles fiom the Matt-son home. Sunday, night 01 acted J through an Inter- ,| mcdlnry, b'lt It seemed certain tho money had been paid < ,^ The cash lepoijediy Chanel hands cither late v Init night, or * caily today " ' Quo icpoit wo. 1 , that^Dr. Matl"on delhinert tho ransom when, he diove away from "his bealtttful homo ovcilooking Pilget Sou.nd.ln R battered, old'car. Several ojlj; '• ceis accompanied him Where,ti)eyS| went was' not known but thiSrb^ " wcie reports he hod r been Instructed lo use a cai of a' "special" typo when lie kept Ills rendezvous'with, the abductor.', ' •' There were olhei mysterious trips from the home Close friends 1 anil relathes came and went at; all hours through the night Lights bla?ed In all rooms ahc pctlvlly was the greatest s!nce_ Charles was ( taken v i » Reporters, ~ who have watched s the house and the Mattsons constantly since Sunday night, noted that members of the-family w'eie moie s clieerful and tha.1 the tense /| atmosphere of 'yj.iterday-vva.v gone^t aomtt pel sons "believed.,, Charles, alieady had been released'and was piellmlnury examination Hits aft-1 slipped Into the house last night -rucon br-foio Magistrate D Hedge of Hajtl. The ehaig'esfwoio oilglnally fll- cil in Justice L G White's comt nl Biangadoclo hut ueio later 10- 184 7-8 26 53 1-2 75 1-: 115 34 3123 373 354 3 64 105 113 3 56 3-4 41 1-4 103-4 51 7-8 11 1-2 3 1-8 45 1-2 68 3-4 133 4 •543-4 84 3-4 78 17 3-4 7 3-4 )acus Company of West Memphis Buys Cieam- eiy Package Site A band mill and planing mill, lo employ about 25 men, will be established In Blythevllle In the. hem rnture by the Dacus Lumber'Co. (hlcli for several years lias opei- atcd a sawmill and wholesale lumber business.at West'Memphis. The company has completed arrangements for tlic purchase of the site formerly occupied by Hie Dly- thevllle plant of the creamery Package company, consisting of' 24.273 acres along the Frisco right of way, just south of the Blythe- vllle Canning company's plant. The actual transfer will lake place as soon as the abstract Is completed, possibly tomorrow, several acres of the tract will be used for the Dacits company's mill and storage yard The Dae us company was assisted In obtaining a location here by J. Mell Brooks, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, who said today that while no large stands of timber remain In this vicinity the Dacus company expects no difficulty In obtaining sufficient logs to operate the mill here for many years: The company plans to'pro- duce both rough and finished hardwood lumber at Its mill here and also to do custom planing and mill work. moved .lo. .Justice and today It was Elliott's agreed that Magistrate Hedge shoiiUl be asked lo come heie and preside at the hcailng , 'Another. preliminary, scheduled foi today before Justice Elliott, was continued until nlclay because of Iho hcarins'for HID three defendants In the Johnson murder case. Ezra Craven, Canada Switch fanner, charged .wllli the nnirder f his wife on Dec 23, will be hen a preliminary healing lo lorrow Igutend of today. Consluuniulu IntciCot !,a* been lanlfeslcd in Ihe hearing for-the hree Dccrlng men. Early today esldcnls of Ihe Bering commun- ly, in western Pcmiscot county, icgan to arrive and by noon n urge number were here for the rial. When It developed that Ellott's modest justice court room von Id not be able to take care if the crowd it was agreed , to move proceedings to the clrculi :ourt room In the court house. Howard Slgcrt, the defendant ^ iu , who ' Is charged' with the 'n'ctua rectors nurder, Is represented by Hooker! and Mcdltng while Isom Baxter, accused of holding Johnson while Slgert knifed him, Is represented There was no confirmation 10! Ihis iimioi, howe\er, and the gen- eial belief,was that he would jie L released later In the day -*• r Despite their cheerful attitude/' incmbcis of the family maintained,. secrecy on all phases of the caso _| and refused to discuss Iho possl- 1 blllty the boy's safe retuin wo-s nssmcd ,-il J Livestock Animals at African walerholss step aside when the ostrich comes down to drink. BAST Err, LOUIS, HI., Dec. 31 (UP)—Hops: receipts 5,500 Top 10.70 170-230 Ibs 10.50-10.65 140-160 Ibs 7.75-10.35 Bulk BOWS 9.25-9.60 Cattle: receipts 2,000 Steers • 6.45-10.00 Slaughter steers 6.00-8.00 Mixed yearlings and heifers 4.75-11.00 Slaughter heifers 4.25-5.25 Beef cows 3.00-4.00 Youth Admits Planning Robbery of His Uncle CARUTHERSVILLE, Mo.— Jessi Baird has admitted, according tc officers, thai he planned and di reeled the robbery of his uncle Hollls Balrd. night club operator who was held up, shot and rob bed of about $2CO early on th morning of December 23 as h started to enter his home afte coming in, from his place, th camthersvllle Night Clu'.v locale on Highway 84, a short distanc west of this city. Young Baird. however, said li did not do the actual robblni but loitered near to "point oui the club operator. Baird was sho in the hand as he started to rests the bandit, who thpi robbed him and made his get-away. The rob ber Is still at large. | Young Baird has waived examination and is being held In the county Jail without bond pending his appearance before the circuit 1 court; Ask Federal Agproval^ j^-1 for Bank at Monettg: LITTLE ROCK, Ark^J W, Bu^ ick and other business men~"'of Moneltc, Oralghead county, filed' application with state Bank Com-/) mlsstoncr Marlon, Wassou yester-^ day foi a charter for Ihe Monct'.fii' State , bank, \vhtchi4hcy plani -to open about JanuaryJO The appll-', cation was forwarded to the Fe'd-i cral Deposit Insu—-i Corporation for approval "'-- > v *° The proposed bank will ha\e ? a" t capital stock of $25,000 and a sur-, , plus of $5,000 It will be the only- ' ^.% bink between Joncsboro and Ihevllle Officers will be J w. BII- ?ick, president, Robert Fisher, vice- president, Roy Jacobs, cashier; R, E.. 1-ownsend and Enc Rogers, dl-', by Corbett and PcnJ. who also rep- •esent C. A. Jolif?. accused of turning put the lights In his dance hall during the knifing Caruthersville Factory Announces Wage Boost CARUTHERSVILLE, Mo.—Monte Shoemaker, superintendent of the Brown Shoe C<x plant here, has announced a five percent pay Increase for all employees effective in or about'Jan. 11. Shoemaker sold some employees would get slightly more than this, depending on the nature of their work. Tills Is the second local concern to announce a •'raise In : wages early : next year. /.Vml; a week ago, E. c., Masdon, proprielor .0! the Home Oil & Gas Co,, announced a 10 percent Increase to all his employees, to take, effect January 1. ^ Tiie shoe factory employs between 400 and 500, while the oil concern has 15 or 20 employes. Destroy Two Stills on Island in River .!<• * Two illicit whisky stills were found and destrojed on Lee's towhead by three officers who fought Ihcir way through underbrush and o driving rain yesterday to reach the stills ; Arch Lindsey and Herman Spicfir, sheriffs deputies, l and Garland Trammel! &puty constable from Wilson, found the stills on the tow-head, adjoining Island No 25 In the Mississippi rlier < . One or the stills was a copper outfit of eight-barrel capacity and the other was a two-barrel outfit', Lindsey srid They were located about a mile apart f The stills were deserted when the officers reached them They passed several men while closing In on one' .of the outflls. WEATHER Auto Stolen at Cooter .Local officers were notified to be on the lookout today for a 1932 model Chevrolet two-door"' sedan stolen at Cooler,' Mo., last night. The. automobile Is the property of A; S. Llller, Aikwsas — Slightly warmer in west and central portions tonight." Friday increasing cloudiness afid" slightly warmer. - ' ~ Memphis and Uctnlly—Fair tonight with lowest temperature 32'' lo 36 Friday cloudy and warmer, The maximum temperature here' yesterday was minimum 51, cloudy, with 111 Indies of ratet according lo Samuel P Nbrris, official weather obsmeri <. " : %,J

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