The Tennessean from Nashville, Tennessee on November 5, 2008 · A12
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The Tennessean from Nashville, Tennessee · A12

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Nashville, Tennessee
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Wednesday, November 5, 2008
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A12
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12A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2008 cp THE TENNESSEAN HOW TENNESSEE VOTED DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN BARACK JOHN OBAMA McCain Undecided at press time AS OF 11:30 P.M. Crff Obion f A Weakley HenrV J iDver "J Irf XxA Gibson carroii Av&ocketfN Ly " (Lauderdale "S rftrrWHaywoodlladison Pendersony Stewart L- -S I Macon Lg rA .J Claibo"' r o 1 x j i cmh . r i iu ji . J rentress ; Jacksonl Overton Dickson UDavidsonA Wilson YU 'Humphreys unionTit Hamhlen Greene Washington Carter ueivaiu k - . . Williamson Rutherfor?T White "-umDenano Hickman r J jCannon i Van Knox Jefferson Cocke Roane S (Perry Lewis Wayne Maury a S Bedford ire Coffee 'Rhea. iwrence Giles x.WS , urunay j hf McMinn Lpudonl Blount Monroe Sevier Lincoln 1 Franklin Marinn t, & 7 Polk COMING THURSDAY Precinct-by-precinct look at Davidson and other counties SOURCE: Associated Press THE TENNESSEAN COUNTY-BY-COUNTY TP PR OBAMA MCCAIN Anderson 29 29 11,385 19,614 Bedford 18 18 5,026 10,215 Benton 6 6 2,644 3,695 Bledsoe 15 15 1,517 3,166 Blount 52 52 15,252 35,553 Bradley 17 17 9,353 28,324 Campbell 21 21 3,866 6,535 Cannon 9 9 2,010 3,320 Carroll 22 22 3,980 7,454 Carter 21 21 5,587 15,849 Cheatham 9 9 5,497 10,697 Chester 11 11 1,794 4,586 Claiborne 18 18 3,078 7,174 Clay 7 7 1,248 1,674 Cocke 19 19 3,339 8,945 Coffee 24 24 7,128 13,239 Crockett 12 12 1,818 3,749 Cumberland 26 26 7,889 17,436 Davidson 169 158 154,148 99,731 Decatur 13 13 1,595 3,178 DeKalb 16 16 2,832 4,085 Dickson 18 18 7,504 11,672 Dyer 16 16 4,411 9,859 Fayette 17 17 6,888 12,158 Fentress 13 13 1,831 4,789 Franklin 18 18 6,609 10,533 Gibson 36 36 7,406 13,516 Giles 14 14 4,614 6,902 Grainger 10 10 2,065 5,297 Greene 39 39 7,107 17,148 Grundy 13 13 1,969 2,561 Hamblen 17 17 6,804 15,501 RESULTS TP PR OBAMA MCCAIN Hamilton 135 135 64,205 81,666 Hancock 7 7 604 1,587 Hardeman 13 13 5,919 5,225 Hardin 18 18 2,794 7,076 Hawkins 26 26 5,924 14,745 Haywood 15 15 4,891 3,165 Henderson 15 15 3,021 7,669 Henry 13 13 5,152 8,182 Hickman 18 18 3,563 4,784 Houston 7 7 1,678 1,608 Humphreys 9 9 3,600 3,818 Jackson 17 17 2,284 2,185 Jefferson 11 11 5,177 13,092 Johnson 12 12 1,837 4,620 Knox 96 94 67,923 109,847 Lake 4 4 1,024 1,175 Lauderdale 16 16 4,322 4,933 Lawrence 29 29 5,160 10,565 Lewis 9 9 1,803 2,951 Lincoln 22 22 3,694 9,226 Loudon 14 14 6,058 15,815 McMinn 15 15 5,539 12,984 McNairy 17 17 3,131 7,134 Macon 10 10 2,060 5,145 Madison 33 33 20,027 23,289 Marion 20 20 4,506 6,746 Marshall 9 9 4,319 6,755 Maury 21 21 13,057 20,282 Meigs 6 6 1,371 2,795 Monroe 13 13 5,049 11,478 Montgomery 24 24 25,634 30,103 Moore 5 5 881 2,010 TP TOTAL PRECINCTS PR PRECINCTS REPORTING TP PR OBAMA MCCAIN Morgan 12 12 1,969 4,717 Obion 12 12 4,308 8,873 Overton 13 13 3,418 4,495 Perry 12 12 1,329 1,596 Pickett 9 9 854 1,786 Polk 11 11 2,124 4,267 Putnam 44 44 9,735 17,098 Rhea 15 15 2,905 8,033 Roane 25 25 7,222 15,643 Robertson 19 19 9,318 17,903 Rutherford 48 48 40,412 59,850 Scott 10 10 1,720 4,931 Sequatchie 10 10 1,717 3,606 Sevier 20 20 8,597 24,915 Shelby 274 18 54,139 27,567 Smith 8 8 2,990 4,561 Stewart 9 9 2,470 2,956 Sullivan 29 29 18,346 44,802 Sumner 36 36 21,486 44,947 Tipton 13 13 7,911 17,114 Trousdale 10 10 1,474 1,687 Unicoi 8 8 2,106 5,011 Union 9 9 1,828 4,461 VanBuren 7 7 849 1,293 Warren 21 21 5,515 8,558 Washington 40 40 15,894 32,216 Wayne 14 14 1,355 4,075 Weakley 10 10 4,594 8,853 White 11 0 0 0 Williamson 39 39 27,879 64,843 Wilson 36 36 15,462 33,767 Totals 2,258 1,978 874,327 1,345,2 Kurita appears to lose write-in bid By Theo Emery THE TENNESSEAN Attorney Tim Barnes appeared headed for a victory over his state Senate opponent in the same party, incumbent Sen. Rosalind Kurita, in one of the most closely watched and fiercely fought Senate elections. With about a fifth of precincts reporting, Barnes led Kurita 65 percent to 35 percent; returns from Cheatham County were not expected until after midnight. The race proved to be high drama after Democratic Party officials overturned Kurita's 19-vote primary win in August and nominated Barnes in her place. Kurita accused her own party of "stealing" the election and vowed to fight on with a write-in bid. She also sued in federal court; her appeal of the suit's dismissal is pending. The contest has garnered substantial attention because of Kurita's controversial role in electing Republican Ron Ramsey as Senate speaker in early 2007. It has also attracted criticism of the Democrats for throwing out the primary results. The outcome of the race is unlikely to affect control of the Senate because several other key races have been seen as more likely to swing control to one party or the other. Republicans were poised to claim at least one more seat in the Senate, which would solidify the party's control. Barnes is unlikely to support anyone other than a Democrat as speaker, given that anger toward Kurita and her vote for Ramsey helped fuel his campaign. Kurita, who has been in the Senate since 1996, was widely expected to win an easy victory over Barnes in the primary. Instead, the election was a near upset, with Barnes coming within 19 votes of winning. After the votes were certified, Barnes challenged the outcome, citing voting irregularities, crossover voting and dirty tricks. State party officials voided the election and sent it back to a three-county convention of party officials to decide. They overwhelmingly nominated Barnes. Republicans claim majority in state House GOP takes 3 seats from Democrats By Theo Emery and Anne Paine THE TENNESSEAN Republicans gained four seats in the House in Tuesday's elections, putting the party in control of both legislative houses for the first time since Reconstruction. Three seats held by Democrats went to Republicans, and a fourth seat that was open fell into the Republican column. The four-seat GOP gain gave Republicans a razor-thin 50-49 edge. The loss of seats was a blow to Democrats, who had predicted at least maintaining their majority. Democratic Party spokesman Wade Munday expressed disappointment and conceded that Republicans had taken control. "Frankly, we need to regroup, be bolder in our policy positions and continue to work toward positive changes in the way business is done in Nashville," he said. The race Tuesday that decided control of the House was in the 48th District between Democrat Tim Tipps, a Murfreesboro real estate appraiser and businessman, and Republican Joe Carr, owner of an energy conservation consulting company. Carr won with 51.5 percent of the vote. This seat is being vacated by retiring Rep. John Hood, a Democrat. In the 36th House District, Republican Chad Faulkner defeated Democrat Roger Byrge for the seat vacated by Democrat William Baird. In the 66th District, Robertson County incumbent Bob Bibb, a Democrat, lost to Republican Evans. Cobb Evans Johnson J Stewart contender Josh Cobb's victory in 64th District is bright spot for Democrats Democrat Stan Wheeler lost to Republican Vance Dennis in the 71st House District, and in the 2nd in East Tennessee, Republican Tony Shipley unseated Democrat Nathan Vaughn. One bright spot for Democrats was Ty Cobb's successful bid to unseat Republican Tom DuBois to take the incumbent's 64th District State House seat. Cobb, a firefighter who was the youngest person to be elected to the Maury County Commission, won with 52 percent of the vote. Democrat Phillip Johnson of Pegram, the Republican incumbent in the 78th District, held a wide lead over Democrat David Davidson of Kingston Springs, while Mike Stewart, a Democrat, was ahead of independent Dan Scott in Davidson County's District 52 seat, which had been held by Democrat Rob Bri-ley. Contact Anne Paine at 615-259-8071 or apaineiatennessean.com. Contact Theo Emery at 615-726-4889 or temeryiatennessean.com. Coopertown votes out its controversial mayor By Clay Carey THE TENNESSEAN Voters in Lebanon and in Sumner County filled open mayoral seats in Tuesday's election, while residents of Coopertown turned out the mayor who brought notoriety to their tiny city. In Wilson County, Philip Craighead will take the helm from Don Fox, who is leaving office after 15 years as mayor of Wilson County's seat. And in neighboring Sumner County, County Commissioner Anthony Holt easily won a four-man race to fill out the rest of former County Executive Hank Thompson's term. Thompson, who was first elected county executive in 2002, died of lung cancer in July at age 69. Coopertown Mayor Danny Crosby fell hard to challenger Sam Childs, losing almost 2-to-1 in a four-man race to lead the Robertson County town. Crosby's public persona made the contest one of the Nashville area's most compelling. He was roundly criticized by national motorist groups, which accused him two years ago of running speed traps to beef up town coffers at the expense of unsuspecting drivers. He was later accused of conducting public meetings in private, ordering officers to target Latinos and soldiers for traffic tickets and of intimidating political adversaries, including Childs. Those charges prompted the local district attorney to try to oust Crosby from office, but a judge allowed him to keep his job because prosecutors couldn't prove that his alleged commands were carried out. "The city of Coopertown voted what they want for mayor. God bless 'em," Crosby said Tuesday night. He said he doubts he'll seek public office again. "I'm through with it." Wilson County races Craighead, owner of a construction company, earned 56 percent of the vote in his mayoral race, according to unofficial election results. He beat William Farmer, a Lebanon city councilman. In neighboring Mt. Juliet, Linda Elam beat out three challengers to retain her seat as mayor. Elam received 32 percent of the vote, besting former Mayor Kevin Mack, city commissioner Jim Bradshaw and Wendell Marlowe, a local middle school principal and former county commissioner. Sumner County races Holt cruised to victory in the race for Sumner County executive, earning more than 50 percent of the vote. He will fill out the last two years of Thompson's term. Holt defeated former county Commissioners Steve Sudbury and Kenny Pierpaoli and local resident Phillip Hight. Voters in White House voted for a proposal that will allow restaurants there to serve liquor by the drink. White House is in Sumner and Robertson counties and is home to about 9,600 resi dents. In Goodlettsville, which straddles the Davidson-Sumner county line, voters seemed poised to pass liquor by the drink on the Sumner County side of town. Several nearby cities already allow liquor by the drink, including Hendersonville, Gallatin, Springfield and Nashville. Rutherford, Williamson In Smyrna, a referendum allowing liquor stores was approved, two years after a vote on a similar measure went the other way. Opponents have said the measure could worsen alcohol abuse and crime in the town. Before Tuesday's election, package liquor sales were allowed in 84 of Tennessee's 347 towns. The Rutherford County cities that border Smyrna Murfreesboro and La Vergne already allow liquor stores. In another alcohol-related vote, residents in Nolensville approved a referendum allowing restaurants to sell liquor by the drink. The measure passed by a two-to-one margin, according to unofficial election results. Before Tuesday night's vote, 77 Tennessee municipalities had approved the sale of liquor by the drink. Nolensville was the only town in Williamson County that did not already allow it. Contact Clay Carey at 615-726-5933 or mca reyiatennessean.com. r

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