Star-Gazette from Elmira, New York on May 30, 1983 · 8
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Star-Gazette from Elmira, New York · 8

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Elmira, New York
Issue Date:
Monday, May 30, 1983
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8
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T , ) f J.... I if i.lwLr, mmmmmimmmmmmm The 'coaster crescent9 An area stretching from Toronto to Rochester By ED McCULLOUGH NIAGARA FALLS, Ontario (AP) Paul Ruben, a roller coaster enthusiast since the heyday of the 1926 Crystal Beach Cyclone, relishes the prospect of his first ride on the Dragon Mountain coaster being built at Marineland in this Canadian resort city. ' "It's by far the world's longest steel coaster and the highest one In North America," said Ruben of the $15 million, 5,500-foot coaster that will start at the top of a 186-foot hill and run through tunnels, loops and a volcano at speeds of up to 50 miles an hour. "It rivals Disney," said Ruben, a 46-year-old optical engineer from Rochester, N.Y. who is chairman of Amusement Park Club International and regional representative of American Coaster Enthusiasts. Dragon Mountain is the newest coaster in an area from Rochester to Toronto that Ruben calls the "coaster crescent." Among 15 coasters are Darien Lake's $6.5 million Viper, built last year, and four coasters added in 1981 at Canada's Wonderland outside Toronto. "This is by far the densest population of roller coasters in North America," said Ruben, who put the "crescent" on a par with central Florida and southern California., 4 iThe history of the roller coaster in western New York and the Niagara Frontier goes back almost to the time La Marcus Thompson constructed his Switchback Gravity Pleasure Railway, perhaps the first commercial coaster, in 1884 at Coney Island in Brooklyn. The Jackrabbit at the Seabreeze amusement park in Rochester has been thrilling riders since 1920 with its opening rush through a gully and final plunge down a tunnel that leaves riders hanging in mid-air. ' Crystal Beach in Fort Erie, Ontario, installed its Giant in 1916 and the Cyclone, which dropped Gannett News Service Runners and joggers injured in the line of duty are older and heavier and most likely to develop their problems running in the i morning and going up and down .hills. - The most extensive survey of r runners ever conducted also reveals, unexpectedly, that those most likely to suffer ailments are -those who run 20 or fewer miles a .week. r, : Eighty percent of ailing runners are wearing the wrong shoes, and 1 90 percent of them aren't warming up properly, says podiatrist John W. Pagliano, who, with orthopedist Dr. Douglas Jackson, directs the running clinic at Memorial Medical Center in Long Beach, Calif. id. Since 1976, Pagliano and Jackson Study Sister Nicosia wins o; .ii You've heard about Texans doing things in a big way. Well, Sister Katherlne Nicosia, S.S.J., who hails from Houston, is keeping the Texas spirit going with her talent. i.-At the recent Arts in the Park shabang, Sister Nicosia took the Elmira Art ShopCorning Art and Frame Shop Award for Best Photography, which added a bit more "icing to the cake." t.v.The week before, on May 14, her work, entitled "Magnolia Grove," was chosen as the winner of the (Visual Horizons Award in the Memorial Art Gallery's 1983 ; Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition, for creative use of photography. The SX-70 photographic print will be on exhibit at the Rochester gallery through June 26. Sister Nicosia, director of religious education at St. Mary's parish, received a bachelor's : degree in education from the University of Huston in 1970, a bachelor's degree in painting from .Dominican College, Houston, in 1972, and a master's degree in fine arts from the Rochester (N.Y.) Institute of Technology in 1980. And since Houston is fresh in one's memory, Horseheads native Mary Agnes Leahy Just received her Doctor of Juriprudence from South Texas College of Law. Leahy will soon start work as a nifiiriifniiiiii.ir iifr. M t I iw,: ,;, .iJtoi -rttirriirti'iiiTiiiittiiii)-iriiiWiliii Riders thrill on the Viper at Darien Lake . .one of five coasters built riders 96 feet into a steep, highspeed turn that threw them to their sides, 10 years later. "The Jackrabbit is taken for granted locally, but people come from all over the country to ride it," Ruben said. "All of a sudden, the coaster drops out from under you. You can't help but scream."' On the Cyclone, torn down in 1946, "People lost combs, false examines have profiled 6,000 injured runners. They reported the findings on 3,000 of them at the recent annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Montreal. The most common running injuries were plantar fasciitis (heel spur), shin splints, knee . ligament instability, Achilles' tendinitis, forefoot strain, heel pain, midfoot strain and ankle sprain. Some of the survey highlights: The average weight for men was 152 and for women 122, both higher than expected and . dispelling the long-held belief that long-distance runners weigh very little. Women were far more likely to suffer shin splints pain along the shin bone. The second most Strictly 'r Personal fc H Liz Greene ' briefing attorney for Judge Norman Black, in the Federal District Court of the Southern District of Texas. The daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Anselm J. Leahy of 100 Lynhurst Ave., Horseheads, received a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's College, Notre Dame, Ind., in 1971, and a master's degree from Kent (Ohio) State University in 1974. Patrick F. Dandrea of 430 Herrick St., and a senior at Southside High School, has enlisted in the Army Reserve Simultaneous Membership Program. As a member of the program, he will attend Corning Community College, take ROTC at Cornell University, and participate with the 969th Maintenance Company of the Army Reserve at the Horseheads facility. Betsy Cummfng is going to do her internship in Washington, but it's not in the medical field. l Star-Gazette, Monday, May 30, 1983, Page 8A AP Loserphoto recently in the "coaster crescent. teeth, purses," Ruben said. "They fainted, passed out, broke their ribs. That was the only coaster known to have a nurse on duty at all times." Thompson and others started a coaster craze that lasted to the Depression. Hundreds of communities set up coasters and other rides at the edge of town or the end of a trolley line. running common injury in women was chondromalacia, or runner's knee. Pagliano blames this on excess pressure on that part of the leg because of a woman's naturally wider pelvic bones. Seventy percent of those injured ran from one to five miles a day, and one-third of those injured worked out in the morning. "When you jump out of bed in the morning, your muscles are still contracted and the chances of injury are higher." said Pagliano. "When we treat runners, we try to get them to change their time of running." Over one-third of the injured were running hills; most of these injuries were incurred running downhill. A surprising 7 percent of those injured suffered from back, photography award Betsy has been chosen to work as a legislative intern in the House of Representatives, in the Washington office of Congressman Stanley Lundine. A public administrationpublic policy analysis major and master's degree candidate at State University of New York at Binghamton, she is the recipient of the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Scholarship, granted to graduate interns. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Cumming, live at 96 Morningside Drive. David Stow of 275 Breesport Road, Horseheads, is walking taller these days. The Horseheads High School junior is the recipient of this year's Farm Bureau Citizenship Award. The annual award is based on active participation in family, school and community affairs. Independent marketing consultant Linda S. Williams of the Thornapple Design Company, in Wellsboro, has become the recipient of two second place awards of excellency in the ElmlraCorning Ad Club Addy Awards Competition. A brochure she designed and wrote for The Cedar Run (Pa.) Inn took second place in the "Single Direct Mail Brochure" category. The other second was 1 I "There were close to 5,000. Every town seemed to have one, said Robert Cartmell, an art professor at the state University of New York at Albany who is writing a history of the roller coaster. "In the Depression, they were considered frivolous," Cartmell said. "People let them go to pieces. A lot were torn down for wood for houses." Lately, there has been a resurgence nationwide which Cartmell calls the "second golden age of roller coasters." "We're not building as many, but they're better," he said. Coasters have helped turn area amusement parks, which sprung up or expanded in part to accommodate the millions of tourists who visit Niagara Falls, into big businesses. Darien Lake attracted 1.25 million customers last summer, generated $16 million and provided 2,600 seasonal jobs, spokeswoman Claudia Chirumbolo said. Marineland, long known for its dolphin and killer whale shows, has begun a six-year, $120 million expansion into a theme park, the heart of which will be Dragon Mountain. "A lot of people didn't consider this a full-blown park until the coaster came in," Ms. Chirumbolo said of Darien Lake, which this year added the ferris wheel from the 1982 World's Fair at Knoxville, Tenn. Even smaller parks, like Fantasy Island on Grand Island outside Buffalo, N.Y., or Roseland in Canandaigua, attract thousands of customers and provide hundreds of seasonal jobs. The business of amusement parks, however, is fun. That to Ruben, who can rattle off the designers and dimensions of rides across the country, means roller coasters. "I think it's something most people outgrow when they get their high school diploma," he said. "I never did." injuries hip and upper leg problems. "We're assuming we're dealing with overweight, over-age athletes who have been out of shape for 10 years and try to get back into it too fast and without proper training," said Pagliano, who runs 70 to 85 miles a week himself. "The severity of the injuries was surprising," he added. "We thought they'd be dinky little micro-strains and such, but we're seeing major problems." Seventy percent of the runners came to the clinic only when they were in such pain they could not run at all or it compromised their running, he said. "The lesson here," said Pagliano, "is get help while it's still a minor problem." taken in the category of "Letterheads, Logos and Trademark Designs," designed by she and Bob Williams, as the company's stationery package. Dr. William E. Ash, professor of mathematics at State Agricultural and Technical College at Alfred, is the author of an article on computer literacy in the current issue of Common Knowledge, a publication of the Community College General Education Association. The article deals with the importance of this literacy in what Prof. Ash calls "this age of high technology." A new "sarge" has signed on as Army recruiter at the Diven Plaza ' station. Staff Sgt. John T. Klely of 358 W. Thurston St. will be explaining educational programs, Job opportunities, skill training and the Delayed Entry Program to area high school students. Kiely joined the Army after graduation from high school in 1972. He has worked in the air defense at Ft. Bliss, Texas and Ft. Lewis, Wash. Prior to his arrival in Elmira, he was stationed in Germany where he received the Noncommissioned Officer of the Year Award for the Air Command in Europe. Qmm b Differ hi th Feature! Dopertotenl. Abigail Van Buren DEAR ABBY: Thanks for mentioning the Living Will in your column again. I read about it in your column five years ago and obtained two one for myself and one for my wife. We were both 65 and in good health. We're 70 now and hope to have many good years ahead of us, but one never knows. I am enclosing a copy of the column I clipped. Please give it another run. I am sure there are thousands of people who will benefit from it as we have. C&L in El Paso, Tex. Dear C&L: Here it is. DEAR ABBY: I want to thank you for the most wonderful present I have ever received. Because of an item in your column last year, I sent for the Living Will. Now I have peace of mind, knowing that if my husband or I should ever become terminally ill, our loved ones will never have to watch us die slow and agonizing deaths as some we have witnessed. I saw my handsome six-foot, 200-pound father waste away to an 88-pound skeleton after fighting a Question: Our son enters high school next year. We would prefer that he attend a special high school for kids talented in math and computer science rather than the high school in our neighborhood. Most of the kids who have been in the special program go on to good colleges where they do well. Bill refuses to see the benefits of the program we prefer and insists on going to the school where all his friends go. Should we enroll him against his will, hoping he'll change his mind once he gets there? Answer: It may not be possible to enroll him against his will even if you want to. Many magnet or special school programs will accept only those youngsters who willingly choose to attend because they generally are more successful than their unwilling counterparts. Usually these schools have long waiting lists; filling the open positions with kids anxious to attend is no problem. Yes, it's frustrating to stand by and watch our children occasionally make choices that we feel are poor ones. We'd like to use our logic and force to eliminate that possibility. Unfortunately, that's not the way it works with kids. Teen-agers entering high school have minds of their own. Strong parental pressure invites protests, defiance, and rebellion. The easiest way to get even with a parent who forces you into a school you don't wish to attend is to either flunk out or get kicked out. Don't try, then, to influence M" Coping irA win. I . uNfcac& Linda Albert House li can Ivy Dr Timothy I jr Johnson . So you don't think you're getting too much sodium in your diet? Maybe you should think again. Even people who go easy on the salt shaker may be getting much more sodium than they need in their diets, because so many foods are so high in added salt. An English muffin has from 210 to 355 milligrams of sodium (depending on the brand); three ounces of tuna fish, 290-385 milligrams; six ounces of tomato juice, 360-590 milligrams; a six-ounce serving of yogurt, 90-175 milligrams. These foods are not extraordinarily high in sodium, but are mentioned to indicate that we consume a lot of sodium from foods we wouldn't ordinarily think of as "salty." Frozen and canned foods tend to have more sodium than fresh foods. The federal government has set the recommended dietary allowance for sodium in adults at 1,100-3,300 milligrams levels Here's more on Living Will two-year battle with cancer. The doctors told us it was hopeless, yet they kept that poor dear man alive month after month with transfusions, tubes, needles and drugs, while he prayed to God to take him. Abby, you would do millions of readers a priceless service by acquainting them with the .Living Will as you did me. Grateful In Joliet, HI. Dear Grateful:" Thank you for ; giving me this opportunity to publicize the Living Will again. The Living Will can be obtained by writing to: Society for the Right to Die, 250 W. 57th St., New York, N.Y. 10019. Yes, I have signed one. I '. requested six copies and enclosed my check for $10; to cover cost of documents and mailing. (It is tax deductible.) If you send for the Living Will, please be patient. I promise your request will not be overlooked. Be sure to enclose your name and address, clearly written. The documents are free, but this is a nonprofit organization, so all donations are gratefully accepted. School is child's choice your teen with "pressure or force. Turn the decision of where to attend school over to him. At the same time, stay 'involved and help him gather concrete information that will help him make an intelligent decision. Together investigate the special program under consideration. Don't do this with your mind already made up that it's the best route for him, but rather as an information-gathering expedition to see what it's all about. Arrange for him to spend time at the programme ask questions and to talk with the students. Ask the principal or counselor for the names of students living near you who are already, in the program or who will be attending next year. Having a friend nearby always helps. Listen empathetically to all your son's feelings and objections to the program.. Don't criticize or belittle his thoughts. Search instead for possible ways his objections can be overcome. Encourage him to explore his long-range goals for the future and evaluate which high school program will help him the most. Perhaps in the end he will choose the special high school. If he doesn't, stand by his decision. An A student from the neighborhood high school has a better chance for future success than a D or F student from a special program. Albert h director of Dm Family Miration Cmttr of Florida mti m author. Raaatn art Invltod to twit ouMttom For Mm column to llnda Albort, 7 J 11 lolanoi Ct., TamM, Fla. 1M13. Cutting down on sodium in diet reached quite easily, given the abundance of sodium in everything we eat. A diet high in sodium is a probable risk factor for the development of high blood pressure, or hypertension, so it's a good idea to read product labels and make a conscious effort to ; watch out for salt. Q: It is true carbon monoxide can kill a person without any warning whatsoever? A: A person can slip into unconsciousness and die from carbon monoxide poisoning without realizing what is happening. The gas has no odor, no color and gives no warning. ; Questions should be mailed to Dr. Timothy Johnson, co The Chicago Tribune Co., 220 E. 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 10017. Or, Johmoa It tho Wor of lay Health hrformotlon at Honor- IMwtlty Moolcol khool and holai kM illiikal Iwtruttor aotltlom la awdlclno at Harvard b th MMMctwMttt Gwwfil Hospital

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