The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 17, 1941 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, January 17, 1941
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Page 3
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1041 BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PAGE THREE Hitler Wanted It-U. S. Got It Revolutionary M a c h i n e, Soi ri 1 erl From Europe Help? Uncle Sam Reami Hy NBA""" Service WrrPKUKG}!, Pa. —Whf-n tli»; Germans ynibtofid C/r-choslovukiu (V-,.-y "or i.:ii:c!i loot, bur. thanks to three Czech engin^er.s, the; lost f..-it' pf rhn most rruroir. ihin-i.s in the land—a revolutionary hiyh- •'" '"'1 ''('" •).'';•.' f'!-.-':(ine whieVi Ls today working all out lor Uncle , c :koda m'.miiioij;; works :it Pil.sen, GYecho:ilova!:.i:> ? !iad boon trying to perfect it machine which would make .sisc-11 for^in^s in two openi- iji'ns insi"a»l o! ' live ur ;>ix. They had finally .succeeded in !9'.Jo and had one machine in ucLUctl opera(}'(' v >:t j :i nuv,5 {:;\>w o!' Gtrmaiiy's inlentior: lo lake: ever ihe country. 'i'hr; eij'jkiw.s wrecked the nr-'.v n^ffhin 11 b'-vonu al! hope ui' rf^ur- rpcrtion and :;inuggh;d the drawings and biuftpriui.s out oi tiie (v.unLi-y. Tb.ey made Llieir way t.c Clreat- Britain wlunr- their invention was eagerly piirchased. T.tie Baldwin Soutluvark Co. oi' Philadelphia bought the American pat- mi, ri hl.° riv-t mr V : :' n manui'aciured v-w installed in McKees Rockf, plant < t c- )-ve^cct St.':•! Cai.. Co. ol Pittsburgh, which' had a lar»c order i'or shell forcings from the Wai' Department. Tiie bi.^ advantages of the machine are the saving of time and •the quantity of shell 1'orginus it pi'oduces. It is geared to produce shells of any size from 70 to 105 inill'meters and can be adapted to production of even larger.., shells. At prein-nt, it is- turning" out •about 150 shell forcings au hour. The shell forgings are completely fini.sheci insicie. Vv^ith other machines further boring and cleaning of the forgings'Is necessary. In ihe process of ' manufacture. Mee! l:ars 21 feet long and 3 1/32 j inches square are cut into 7-^-inch lengths by an automatic acetylene cutting machine. These pieces are then fed into a rotary type gas- fired furnace which heats 130 of these billets per hour to 2300 degrees. Afte ran hour t.he bill'iis are fed into the forging machine, in which a shell die pierces the billet and pushes it into the shape of a round-bottomed cup 8 inches long and 4 } ,i inches in diameter. The machine then forces this cup Into* another part cf the mechanism Kvher£ ,j.t is drawn and squeezed into the proper-length and width. When it comes out from the mar chine' the far°-in«; Ls passed on to SL workman who stamps on its order and heat number. It is then. placed in a' sand pit to cool oft'. All this takes taut a lew seconds. Steele Flying Club Orders Training Ship •STEELE, MO.. Jan. 17.--A do/.Oll members of the "Cloud-Cruisers," Steele flying cluix moot weekly on Tuesday nights lo learn more about I »nyiiiH /from in.sirw.tor Johnny j CheimuH. Kennett, Mo., of tin- Sexton Klyinii Servke. At a special meeting Wednesday night, the memoer.; met hern to hear C. J. Woo:l of Memphis, Southern Air Service representative, discuss various phases of .lying. Wood look an order from the group i'or u new US-horsepower •Tandem Cub" irainlny, ship. Deliver., will be made In about a moiuh, Wood said, Negroes Learn To Be Better Citizens At WPA School'Here NOJJTOOS oi HlythevUk' arc U-um- ing to be more useful dli/cns In Ihc WHA Aciuli KrUu':Uicm:il .school, loetuod ut HUi nnrl Row sirrots It Ls the only institution ol iUs kind in Mississippi county, i\u<i is under the direction of Lydia S. Morun. Present enrollment in the .school i.S UG. As many a.s HJ9 negroes hnvo enrolled ui otu> time to loam . oerupu- ho'w lo im.ike .such article* us hats, riiy.s, (|UiH.s and mattresses. Those pilot iMiiiu'cs among; the n j ic i S u»h .subjects Sterle elub who have not yet will utkr I'xamimuUm.s Jan..'24. Tin- club's next ineiHin» is .vl 1'or rholo at left shows steel billets before they start juurru-y (o bec-omo. shell taslngs. 'Hie billet is ed in a furnace for an hour al 2300 degrees fahreuheil, then, at riaht, it Ls liuuled out a«d th« scale knocked on'. Memphis Symphony Group Includes Local Musician A Blythevllle musician will be nliiyinu with the Memphis Symphony orchestra Tuesday when it presents ius lirst ooneert of the year at Ellis auditorium, She is 'Miss Amy Rutli Morris, daughter ol <Mr. and Mr.s. Iverson Morris. At present a sludeiH ol Mrs. Edith Steplian, (&|he has been studying violin i'or 12" yfar.s. Services Held For Mississippi Countian LEACIIV1LLE, Ark.. Jim. 17.— Funeral .services for Fred Cobb. 38, o'' nrar I ertehvillc who died a I St. Bernard HosoUiU in Jonesboro nl~- tcr a len day Illness, wore conducted Wednesday afternoon ut the Cunt! Island cemetery. He is survived by his wife. Mrs Ethel Cobb. and his lather. Jim Co':b jf Calit'orniii. Softball, originally called indoor baseball, originated in 1887. \vrIJ.ing, spelling 1 , yeoyruphy. history, arilhmflie, algebra and Liitlu. by a number oi Icad- ll<> citizens, (he school siH'R.s' Lo tosU-r better ri'UUous imioin the nL'tfroi'.s, lumping to leach them home Improvcmei nelyhbjorllMe.ss, and how to gr-t along '.belter Among thenusolvc.s. Aboirt 175 maitre.sMw have been made ilurliuj the school's existence, with cotton and ticking* fumisheil by the iVderal government and Uu .students- themselves I'uml.shiniL ihreud aiul needles. Among home improvement sub- Jet-Ls tauyhi are methods oi' g't denlns, which have resulted In i I number of gardens buinu' started A cooking iiln.s.s aiul a sewing grouj will be orfcnni/ed iw soon us i cooking stow and sewjng inachln fire acquired. Women In the schoo now are .given reci]x i s. Classes now are held ..chilly from 1 a.m. to 4 p.m. and are open to U neyroos of 1(5 years and over. One Leucher of educational sub- ecus and :i recreational Insirue- or 1'onn Ihe school's personnel uder nuumupmerH of Lydia Moan. The school, in which instruction' lice, is helptul in many ways o negroes who take advantage of he opportunity 10 attend. One species ol' i'lsh makes its mO Inside the body of another mxrine animal, tlu> sea cucumber. Commandery Meets"At . Masonic Hall Tonight A regular meeting of the Olivet Coinmnndery has been announced for tonight by Commandery oln.- cer.s; It will b/ 1 at 7:30 o'clock at the Masonic Hall. MIGHT COUGHS YOU* CHILD'S couching Jic night —caused by throitt "tickle" or irritation, mouih breiithing, or a cold—can ot'ieu be prevented by rubbing tlie tluoat and chest with plenty of Vicks VapoKub ut bedtime: VAPOnurs SWIFT pouitice-and- vupor :icfion loosens phlegm, relieves irritation, clears air passages, tends to stop mouth breaih- intf, und invites heiilinu, restful sleep. Try it. BAD WEATHER AHEAD...; SAYS WEATHERMAN Prtpof* for It new. You 0W. t)gkk rtort* wtd hvsky powtri with ESSO in any wtottwrij €sso OR HAPPY MOTORING Wfi MA K 1C CONCRETt: STORM fiEWKH — ALL SI/K8 Osceola Culvert Co. IMu)iu\s 25:{ &, (JO I>. S. Iiiuu-y Ed Wiseman O.sceolu, Ark. Nexl the billet goes into the forging machine. Pierced and drawn, it has been transformed, left, inlo the shape! oi' a shell. Stamped, it is placed in sand to cool. Casings, ri E ht, have been shaped, are ready for machining and loading;. _^ The Marin Has Landed- On Top Of I The shade known as "buff" received its name from buff leather, made of buffalo hide. R.ead Courier News xvaui. ads •••; «,* ttY JOHN \V. THOMPSON SAN JUAN. Puerto Rico—One mornins several months ago he rolled sleepily out of bed in a ch'nay .garret over his print .shop in ?an Juan, pulled on a pair ot w:ll-\vcrn .slippers., and told me ;hat , .the day of Puerto Rico'3 .Common \Man had come. Today he- i.s president of the Puerto" ri Rican Senate, second in power on the islnnd only to ths governor himself. He rode his 18-months-olci parti into office a-stradclle just one platform plank — "Don't Sell Your Vole!" Luis Ivlunoz Marin. whose Popular Democratic Party, by virtue cf the recent island election, will control half the House of Representatives, is the most romantic politico Puerto Rica has known. Educated at Geargetown University in Washington. D. C.. where he studied law. and a sad-but- wiser graduate of the school of Latin American politics, thi^, black- raaned enbatlero. with . flawless Spanish and excellent English, is - .spellbinder among spellbinders. This time la.st year he couldn't •ve f»"-'rt 11 traffic sticker. Todav •••• ih.- cironijest political power in Puerto Rico. i'is -randinther fought with the c pani.sh army against Simon Boli- v"ar in South America. His father ""is Munoa Rivera, \va.s the George Wtishli'gton of Puerto Rico, securing autonomovis government ior Lhe inland ircm Spain. Ju.st three months before United States troops took possession of Puerto Rico in l£98. ihe cabinet members of that short-lived autonomous government i 'oed ever the crib of Luis Munoz Marin and pronounced him a "beautiful baby." Bince then he j has been in and out of four distinct political parties. He mad:> his first political speech in 1917. under his father's auspices. He admits he wasn't quite j-ure what he was talking about. "By 1921 I realized that the | Unionists were in the hands of the How To Relieve Bronchitis Creomulsion relieves promptly because it goes right to the seat of the trouble to help loosen and expel germ laden phlegm, and aid nature to soothe and heal raw, tender, inflamed bronchial mucous membranes. Tell your druggist to sell you a bottle of Creomulsion with the understanding you must like the way it quickly allays the cough or you are to have your money back. CREOMULSION for Coughs, Chest Colds, Bronchitis the island who knew how to split a ticket when voting. Munoz Marin instituted a single-handed • ••''•• a ' unnpaign. He made SOOTHES CHAFED SKIN ( MQROLINE HMR \BiqBoH/t>s TONIC I JOt'25? P x •* ^* •.% •>,;> - S^"V-MS i K^U! chatted with thousands of jibaros as the hill-farmers are known. He tried to show them why they fchculdiV.t sell their votes for $2 or 53. He told them stories like this: "Boys, here is what it amounts to: You have a sow. You can either sell that sow now for whatever you can get for it, or you can keep the sow, await developments and presently you will have a sow •'ami a litter of pigs. It's up to you." They got the point that way. NOTICE! BE SURE TO BRING YOUR DANCE EVERY SAT. NIGHT Blue Room HOTEL NOBLE Luis Mono* Marin capitalists, so I got, out." Marin -says. -'I stayed with •.he Socialists until the sugar companies took them over, too." He then went with the Liberal Party and rapidly built up a strong personal following. Party leaders saw what was coming' and kicked him out, in 1937. In 1939 Munoz Marin emerged with a new party — the Partidfi Popular Democratico. He had a sign put over ).he doorway of his headquarters reading: "No Votes Parrhl Here." The idea began lo catch'on. n? that, there were perhaps no more than 3000 voters, on The Duke of Windsor's popularity with Americans was evidenced when he "stopped the show" at annual Miami.Fla.. air meet, where 10.000 spectators gave him a 45-minute ovation. Above, he adjusts the natty natty yachting cap he wore when he flew to Miami from the Bahamas Islands, CALL 372 For Fancy & Staple Groceries and First Class, Tender Meats. FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE IN TOWN. CITY FOOD MARKET Corner Franklin & Dugau Harrell Davis J. D. Lunsford Folger's Coffee corns To Happy Hour Grocery & Market FRIDAY BARGAIN DAY Matinee lOc & 20c Night lOc & 30c 'East of the River' with John Gaffield, Bremhi Marshall & Marjorie Rambeau Also Selected Shorts SATURDAY Bury Me Not On the Lone Prairie with Johnny 'Mack Brown Fuzzy Knitfht Also cartoon & serial ''Green Archer." Continuous >.how till IliIIO p.m. . THEY WORTH 5c Each on a pound of Coffee Phone Riti 224 Phone Koxy 322 LISTEN TO KLCN 10:00 a.m.—12:45 p.m.—4:30 p.m. ROXY LAST TIMES TODAY BARGAIN NIGHTS lOc & 20c GUARANTEED "NO-PACK" VALUE Th is b ig, ro o my, 11 5- hp. B nick Sp ecial 4-door sedan, with new super-roomy styling and Fireball Eight engine. Only ...... 1183 THEY'RE ALL IN LOVE, but not with •och otherl Dennis' Constance O'KEEFE • MOORE Helen Lewis PARRISH-HOWARD Laura Hope Crews • Bertoo Churchill Samuel S Hinds*Margaret Hamilton Y ES, SIR—we mean just that! If you can find any item in the price of this big, Fireball- powered 1941 Buick that represents a "pack" or hidden charge of any kind—we'll refund double the amount of that item! We'll gi ve you twice what our written guarantee calls for—because if there's any such unexplained item in our prices, we want to know it so we can take it out. You shouldn't have any trouble spotting such charges. For we quote you plainly itemized prices on all cars. We hand you an itemized invoice that covers every charge when you buy. We give every buyer a written guarantee—because we want all of our customers to know they get fair and square dealing here. But maybe you haven't been aware of the vicious practice called "packing" new-car prices. In that case, drop in and ask for your free copy of "What You Get for What You Pay," which explains all about "packing." It's interesting and informative reading that may save you ,many dollars. And besides, dropping in to get a copy gives you a good excuse for looking over (and maybe even trying out) that big honey of a 1941 Buick that everybody's going for these days. WHAT IS A "PACK"? A pack is an extra item slipped into the delivered price of a new car to enable a dealer to offer more for your present car than it is realty worth in trade. It is a sort of "bait" intended to make you think you're getting a better deal than you actually are. Ask us for a free copy of "What You Get for What You Pay" and see how the "pack" can cost you money. ^ ^M ^H^^V ^^W Try Our "Warm-Morning" Sentry Coal, For the New Warm Morning Stoves GAY & BILLINGS, Inc. PHONE 76 1 with Grant Withers & Mary Arnold Also Cartoon & Serial "Deadwood Dick." Continuous show til! 11:30 p.m. LANGSTON-WROTEN CO. Phone 1004-5 Walnut and Broadway Blythevtlle OUR GUARANTEE: NO "PACK" IN OUR PRICES!

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