The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah on September 28, 1942 · Page 9
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The Ogden Standard-Examiner from Ogden, Utah · Page 9

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Ogden, Utah
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Monday, September 28, 1942
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Page 9
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MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1942 THE OGDEN STANDARD-EXAMINER in in JLAYWRIGHTS ·CAPITALIZING ON NEWCOMERS Young Actresses Get Breaks in Current Productions By MARK BAKBON NEW YORK, Sept. 28, (Wide ~ World) -- Broadway playwrights often travel in trends and this season they have, with considerable profit to themselves and to ambitious young actresses, been concentrating upon the younger generation of the female sex. Currently popular now, among the younger actresses who were heretofore comparatively unknown, are Gwen Anderson in "Janie," Peggy Knudsen in "My Sister Eileen," Dorothy McGuire Claudia," and Uta Hagen Vickie." All are young actresses with the freshness of a girl just entering college, and all four have the promise of acting ability which assures Broadway audiences that there is an able supply of leading ladies coming up for rialto stardom. Miss Hagen, who plays the role of a woman semi-military volunteer in "Vickie," of course is a bit advanced from the stage of being a beginner because she has previously played in several theater guild productions in which she understudied Lynn Fontanne and other stage stars that gave her valuable experience. Now, in "Vickie," she is both romantic and comic in this farce about civilians who are mixed up in the war effort. Gwen Anderson has a role in Brock Pember ton's new comedy production, "Janie," which is the sort of part which only young actresses inherit when they are in line for a Cinderella role. Miss Anderson, who is 21 and comes from Des Moines, had only played some parts in Santa Monica, Calif., and at Pasadena, when she came to and started looking for that would be good for this unknown young actress. Well, she got the best of the season for an unknown young actress and Pemberton has one of the major of his many hits on Broadway. Miss Anderson, who has brown hair and an engaging smile, shows in "Janie" that she has more than acting ability; that she is also an accomplished pianist. Her mother taught her that for she was a concert pianist before she was mar- Here's Diana Barrymore and Mate Jerkin Suit DESERT HONEYMOON -- After driving 250 miles following her day's work at a Hollywood studio, Diana Barrymore walks with her husband oi six weeks. Bramwell Fletcher, on desert where he acts in war picture. Note From Uncle Sam's Niece By TAMARA ANDREEVA ' . By MAY MANN' HOLLYWOOD--To lunch with Diana Barrymore, daughter of the late John Barrymore. Diana is doing right well on her own. Her director, Tim Whelan, who discovered Vivian Leigh and so many other great' stars, says, without exception Miss Barrymore has more talent than any girl'he's ever known. Diana doesn't worry about glamour nor diets nor curves. Like Bette Davis she stresses characterization. For lunch Diana dipped into a chicken sandwich, with an added dish of mayonaise on the side. Most of her education was acquired in Europe. There was a time in her life in Paris--when she was broke --and had to cable frantically for money. From mother of course. Mother is Michaele Strange, the noted authoress and socialite. Diana's current thrill, outside of her bridegroom, Bramwell Fletcher, is her new mink coat. "Anything is possible when you're in the movies," she said. A tour about the Universal lot--· and Anne Gwynne, all dressed in western garb--came floating out of a sound stage. Anne volunteered to walk with us. Her romance with Tom Keene, the western star, is off she admitted. The boy of her heart now days is in the service. He's Bob Ross. Anne plays the sec'ond lead in "Sin Town"--with Constance Bennett. Deanna Durbin, whom we noted lunching alone in the commissary, drove by. She looks lonely. And no wonder -- her husband, Vaughan Paul, has been in the service since April. Deanna lives in their _ big honeymoon house--with her sister and brother-in-law for company. Soon, if gas rationing comes in, she'll have to move. For the nearest bus service is two miles. And TJni- KNOWS US, PASTORATES National Day of Prayer Marked at Local Church COUGARS OPEN SEASON WITH GRID SURPRISE "We have names for our household animals but there are millions of youth today who are recorded by a number," said John Edward Carver Sunday in First Presbyterian church. "God, however, tells us by name. But does He? The universe is so vast, for we know of a star six quintillian miles away. We are so small, the earth beneath our feet weighs a hundred trillion times as much as all present humanity. "In these days doubts press heavily for we see men and more men dressed alike, march alike and almost look alike. One of them is from our home. Can we pray for him and trust God knows for whom we plead? That is a piercing thought to many as 'they plead to God for the youth they so hunger to know is safe. "Mass production is not God's method. Each one of the millions who people our earth have different prints on the finger. Bach face and personality is separate. Biologists declare people are different because of recombinations of chromosomes. No child is a copy of the parents. If each of us _ is unique we each have distinct individuality and why should not God By IXHJDON KELLY DENVER, Sept 28 (AP)--Brigham Young's Cougars, having clawed off the first big surprise of the young season for Mountain Six conference football teams, ·will try to make their opening home stand Dually successful Friday night. They will clash at Provo with the Wyoming university Cowboys in the week-end's only league game. B. Y. U., competing under a new head coach in serious Floyd Millet, upset most calculations with its 12 to 6 triumph over Montana of the Pacific Coast conference last night. Wyoming absorbed a 10 to 0 lacing . from Colorado State but even so, impressed 6000 onlookers with its manpower and offense. Interconference games will keep the four other Mountain Six elevens busy for another week in this lin- up for Saturday: Utah's defending champions vs. Arizona at Tucson (night) Colorado vs. Missouri at Columbia- Colorado Mines vs. Colorado State at Fort Collins; Regis vs. Utah State at Logan. Denver university, which plays The theatre of war, spread out4-of such things, will no doubt sup- the hit comedy, "Claudia," ried. In Dorothy McGuire continues to triumph in the leading role of this girl who suddenly is brought to maturity by realizing that -her mother is about to die. And in the long-time hi't comedy, "My Sister Eileen," Peggy Knudsen is a hit in the role of the young blonde sister who can't make up her mind as to whether she wants to be an actress or get married. Miss Knudsen, it will be recalled, replaced Jo Anne Sayres who created the role and then really got married to a naval officer. Miss Knudsen succeeded her in the role because Miss Knudsen was equally patriotic. She was in (the stage door canteen entertaining soldiers and sailors when the producer of "My Sister Eileen" saw her there. and decided she was the young lady to fit into this leading role of one of the major hit comedies Broadway has seen in years. that is already i's, may draw some of our Yanks to Russia, as it has to such far-flung points as Egypt and the Solomons. And many a fond parent, sister, or sweetheart may wonder how our boys will be received "over there." ply all A. E. F. boys bound for Russia, if ever they are, with little booklets similar to those booklets on etiquette all England-bound boys received from our government for their guidance. But above all, these boys may as well learn from the versal studios 22 miles away. Night time and to hear Bob ter Pidgeon, only just recently made shorts--and by the SPEED LIMIT LOWERED BOISE, Sept. 28 (AP)--Governor Clark this morning issued an executive order reducing the speed limit on -all highways in Idaho to a maximum of 35 miles per hour. The order takes effect immediately. a nearly-seven-foot gorilla, booted, bearded, vodka-guzzling; the country itself was pictured as a snowy desert devoid of even the most primitive conveniences such as the well-known "Chick Sales." , Russia Ordinary Since the beginning of the German offensive Russia's becoming our ally, more has been found out about the Russians and their country. It was discovered that Russians could be' brave, loyal, sad, glad, clever, foolish--in short, very ordinary folks. Our observers- writers, photographers, war correspondents--also hastened to add in their memoirs, articles, and such, that a Russian, besides being an extreme fatalist, is an extreme sentimentalist as well. He never forgets a good turn, and will.' shield a friend at the cost of his own life. As far as Russian hospitality goes, Russians need no introduction--the Russian will not eat until his guest or guests have been fed. He will sleep on the floor if there is but one bed in the house, and he happens to have a guest under his roof. But another quality for which Russians ought to justly be famed, is seldom mentioned--it is his ability to drive a hard bargain. Unless a Yank learns the art of haggling early, he will pay three prices "over there" for everything he may buy. Russian shrewdness is complemented by almost childish inquisitiveness and a riotous sense of humor. No one enjoys a good joke, and even a practical joke played on himself, as much as a Russian does. Sense of Humor In all those qualities--sentimentalism, love of.,the dramatic, generosity, and sense of humor--Russians resemble the Americans. But they also possess some qualities that are peculiarly their own. One of them is the devil-may-care attitude. This attitude results in the Russian seldom being exact, punc- For a great many years the tra- j beginning a simple and brief truth: 'ditional picture of a Russian was the Russians are simple people, ' " and most appreciative of any help given them. Recalls U. S. Gift I will never forget the hot chocolate and biscuits I received in the hard days of Russian civil war from,the American A. R. A. agency in Moscow. In fact, I think these biscuits and hot chocolate are responsible for. my being alive today. For 12 years, in every way I know I have tried to repay the debt I owe this country. I am still trying. My feeling of loyalty and obligation will not end with the war. For it is indeed true that ". . . Russians and elephants never forget." Which is one of the little truths Mr. Hitler is just beginning to find out about. Chester's band at Casa Manana. Bob, who looks so much like Wai- younger--has some movie swing of his band'--he's bound to make some feature pictures too. That is if he doesn't go in the army. His commission is coming up. Noles Blair, ace Hollywood press agent, who is building little Mary Lee, the Republic starlet, into big time, was table visiting with Miss Lee. Mary looks like a freshly- scrubbed child--and it's hard to believe--she's to play the lead in Republic's "Shanty Town." But she's talented--and on her way up. The Wilde twins, who we can never tell apart, were taking a few twirls on the dance floor. They said they'd just completed a Hayworth- Astaire picture and one entitled "Revelry With Beverly." Sojine title. And that's Hollywood! 8263 12-40 Do you want a sturdy but smart outfit which wilt see you through months of school or business? Make this jerkin and skirt in corduroy, wool plaids or gabardine -- and a series of contrasting blouses in colored cottons or rayon crepes. You'll have a young suit which can look fresh and different each day as you wear it with your supply of different blouses. Pattern No. 8263 is in sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 and 40. Size 14 jerkin and skirt take' 3Vs yards 39-inch material; 2% yards 54-inch. Blouse, 17-8 yards 3b or 39-inch abric. For this attractive pattern, send 15c in coin; your name, address, know each individually? When I was in New York City .this month a child was lost. One littte girl in seven million inhabitants was missing. The press, the police and radio urged the seven million to the search and the girl was found. One child in seven million missing and the millions sought and found. It made me think of the Good Shepherd seeking the one lost. I truly believe God knows that one for whom you pray better than you do. "In times like this we are thrown back upon ourselves. We have doubts, sorrows and hopes we must carry alone as far as those near are concerned. Thrown back on ourselves we find God so near, so tender and helpful. This is the national day of prayer. Believe with all your heart God hears you and knows better than you about that son or dear one whose name you breathe so pleadingly when you are with God alone." all of its ex-Big Seven brethren ·vithout causing any effect on the fficial conference championship, will be at home Friday night to Kansas, after losing a 7-0 fray :o another 3ig Six team, Iowa state, in a snowstorm last week. Captain Herman Longhurst's forward passes for Brigham Young led Montana's undoing. Mike Mills, patern number and size to Anne Cabot, 149 New Montgomery St., San Francisco, Calif. If you have home sewing bitions, consult the Fashion Book for the latest fashion ideas! This complete Pattern catalog is 15c. Or you may order a copy of the catalog with a 15c pattern for 25c plus am- I lc for postage, Students Under 16 Years 15c Till 5, Evenings 20c PAUL R O B E S O K '. ETHEL W A T E R S ^ R O C H E S T E R ' TALES OF MANHATTAN wM TMMU NITCHEU. * EIKOC MUETTI CE5W WWEM GUI MTOICK MUXO (MING . ELS* UNCftESTER . KMtGE S*HBt«S · JAMES GLEUOM Ml TK (HUtOHNSON CHOHt '· ALSO -Nothing Like It Ever Recorded On Him Before! "The Battle of Midway" TO TECHNICOLOR! Slower Driving Is Not Yet Ordered SALT LAKE CITY, Sept. 28 (AP) No federal order to enforce a 35- mile speed limit has been received by Utah officials, Governor Maw announced, and said that until such an order was received he has no power to take such a step. The only method by which the speed limit can be changed, he said, is by legislative action, unless a federal order is issued. Should such an order come through, he added, he would take immediate action. GRID SCHEDULE TO BE DRAFTED Central Readyro Defend Title; Four Teams in City Circuit « Schedule for the coming football season in the Ogden city high school league will be drafted today, Dave Wangsgaard, loop czar, announced Saturday. The four teams have been undergoing the usual practice sessions since last Monday, when suits were first issued. Wangsgaard reported that the prospects at all of the schools were good and a hard battle for the championship is much in prospect. Whether the league will open with its regular double-header under the lights at the city stadium will also be settled at the Monday conclave. In that the schools opened two weeks later this year, a possibility of playing two rames in one week was suggested. It is hoped bo conclude the schedule before the bad weather sets in. Coaches for football for .the new season will be as follows: Harold Welch, Central; MacRae Magelby, Mound Fort; Carl Taylor, Lewis, and Aaron Home, Washington. Central is the defending champion in the pigskin sport. St. Petersburg Fans Celebrate end, catching one Cougar touchdown. ST. PETERSBURG, Fla., Sept. 23 (AP)--The center of spring baseball training is torn between conflicting allegiances in the coming world series. It is the only city ever to provide training camps for both opponents in a world series. The New York Yankees have been training here for the past 18 years and the St Louis Cardinals for about seven years. Every spring the two teams play week-end exhibition games. This year the Cards trimmed the American league champions six games to three. all-conference for the first B. Y. U. lost 20 to 7 to the Montanans last season. Reports from the league's western realm say that Utah's two-time champions suffered little loss of prestige in their 12-0 defeat by Santa Clara, as the Californians were beefier and more experienced. Quarterback Tex R e i 11 y, a freckled cowboy, scored three touchdowns and freshman John Zeigler made two, one on a 100- yard run with a filched pass, in Colorado's 54-0 outing against Colorado Mines. Dude Dent, Colorado State's all- conference fullback, registered all line resistance needed to turn back 10 points for the Aggies and they Wyoming any time it made threats. backed him up with all the goal- Matinees 200 Evenings 25^..... -Kiddies All Prices Include Federal and State Taxes From the Pony Express: A lot of us are going to die before this war i's over. But it's tilious, or thorough, ring to liVe on the better to die out in the open fighting than lined up before an axis firing squad! CALAMITY JANE. and prefer_ promises of "maybe" "almost" and "perhaps." An American soldier ought to be specially careful when asking for directions or time, for an average, or possibly below-the-average, (but nonetheless numerous), Russian has little sense of measure or time. The language that the Russian speaks is pretty much like the Russian himself--subject of fewer rules than exceptions. To learn it in its completeness would be a prodigious task for' an American A. E; F. boy. There are however some things about it he can learn very quickly and may find them standing him in good stead. Almost all words pertaining to exotic things or machinery are of foreign (French, English, German, Italian) origin. To give but a few instances, the words for tiger, orchid, democrat, republic, public machine, tank, electron, atom, aeroplane, and reporter, for instance are so much like their English counterparts that even an uninitiated can recognize them. They differ merely in pronunciation and in a letter or two, in spelling. There are many more words like that. Many familiar American trade names such as Singer sewing machine, or Underwood typewriter, have become household words in Russia and are synonymous with the articles these manufacturers are known for. - Of course a sign language with which . all Yanks are familiar ought to help a lot in getting such things clarified as "What are you dcin' tonight, babe?" or "I love you," and "Will you give me a. date tonight, honeychile?" The war department or whatever government agency takes cars Scrap Drive Is Continued in S. L. SALT LAKE CITY, Sept. 28 (AP) The Salt Lake City scrap metal salvage campaign, scheduled to end yesterday, has been continued for another week. Approximately 2,000 tons of scrap metal were gathered in the city during the two-week campaign. The quota was set at 2,300 tons. SPORTSMAN BAGS LIMIT EVANSTON, Wyo., Sept. 28 -B. F. Hendrickson spent Saturday and Sunday duck hunting near Lyman on the reservoirs and reports a wonderful trip. He returned Sunday with his limit and plans to spend Tuesday and Wednesday in Star Valley duck hunting and fishing on Salt river with friends. Delays Contract LAST TIMES TONIGHT "SABOTEUR" And "MAYOR OF 44TH ST." PREFERS SCHOOL . . . Brenda Helser (above), A. A. tl. swimming champion, in Portland, Ore., said she preferred -a year of college and another summer of competition with the "Cody Kids" before considering: a movie contract. STARTS TUES. A Grand Program for the Entire Family AND MILTON HOST? with 9XfMOA JOYCE John Shclton · John Carradin* Willi. But And This Thrilling, Action-packed^eMelodranm . MICHAEL Sport Parade 'ARGENTINE HORSES" BISHOP-REGIS TOOMEY- PATTY HALE-Directed by teud Upon o" W«« by Jerom. Odlua . A Woraor BtOfc-l OF THE PROGRAM Victory Reel D. ROSS UDERMAH First Notibnal Picture Bonds ana Stamps at Box fhe happy- hit that hits 1942's jackpot for laughs! COMPANION HIT SHO-TIME "Tombstone" at 1:10, 4:30 and 8:00. "Battle of Midway" at 2:50, 6:16 and 9:40. "Are Husbands Necessary" at 3:10, 6:40 and 10.00. EXTRA "BATTLE OF "DIVIDE AND CONQUER" M-G-BFs WORLDWIDE NEWS 10c15c20c AJX TAXES PAID TODAY AND TOMORROW RT OF THE G R A N GENE AUTRY SMILEY BURNETTE FAY McKENZIE Second Hit TUXEDO JUNCTION Weaver Brothers and Elviry

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