The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia on November 26, 1922 · Page 1
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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 1

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Sunday, November 26, 1922
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GEORGIA FALLS BEFORE ATTACK OF ALABAMA TEASt 4 .4r I- .Harvard Pulling Surprise Conquers Yale Bulldogs BY OWEN FACTOR Crimson Beats Back Ev ery Effort of Bulldogs to Cross Goal Line and Has Needed Punch. BV WALTER CAMP. New Haven November 23. Special. Yale did not bave the punch. That is tbe answer to the bijrpest upset of a tendon on the gridirons of America. YK was picked to win from Harvard but the Crimson was victorious 30 to o. It was the culmination of a season of wrong predictions. Chicago was pii-ked to win from ljrir.c ton. Ohio State was picked to wm from Michigan. Iowa was gipected to lose to Yale. Harvard was accounted a pre-game winner over Princeton. So was Yale. Brown licked Harvard. It has been A season of upsets but Owen was the nan who upset the final kettle of beans for Yale. It was a one man win. The came was won and lost in the first quartpr. Harvard won the toss and the wind. Wowing at the strength of a pale. After the kick off an exchange of punts with some intermediate line play showed Harvard making the most of the advantage of the wind. The most unfortunate of O'Hearn's punt started from the Yale IW-jard line struck a Harvard piayer and bounded along to turf. Quick as a flash Owen gathered it up and wa off on his own 4'Vjard line and started a lie tug dash for the Yale goal. Man after man of ibi Tale team dived fur him. Man afrer man was eluded or brushed aside. Twisting and dodging Owen dashed diagonally across the field. Running in beautiful form head down knees up. v i.h only elbows and piston driv- in kg for an opposing tarkler to meet Owen twisted and fought his way to a clAr field. He bad passed the entire Talc team rpreadea led the defence and done ir almost aione although Harvard interference had formed quickely to protect him. .With an almnpt certain touchdown in sight. N Mdlinrer. the blond Yale quarterback flashed out of nowhere and wiih a tremendous burst of speed brovcht the Critason back. Owen to earth. Yale Braced. Thera Yale braced. a sLe always braced in the last uitch. A smash into the Yaie line with every ounce of Harvard's determination and gni back of it gained only a foot. The YaJe line stopped tbe next attack. It was he third down and the goal line tnil was to t crossed. A great roar rose from the Harvard stands as Captain Bueli of Harvard who had been on the crippled list mo&t of the season and bo was injured acain in the I'rinceton game dashed ou on the field and reported to referee repia' in I.vt at quarter. Buell with his team in sizht of vic- I tory but with anf indomiiaule Yale wall before him. barked the next signal. The ball shot into Owm's stom- acn and head low. ieg driving like tbe pistons of a K eo.ioive the great Harvard ba.-k plunged into the hole J that for ju t p'le in.-tant was opened alongside the K'.ue tackle. With a twist ar.d a grunt l.e squirmed pa t 'be det-perate Vale i f'n o ar.d slid over the line f. r a rnuchdown and enoush points to win one of the greatest ca fs in f. iha'.l hisViry. No leaf of tha i.virel rr i -u wa denied bin Ar r making that toucM wa iwen ntru l with I the task of gathering in the additional point fron t"n lid-- i. and he did his task perfectly n inz R wel aimed drop kick squarely between the posts. Tale Licked. Yaie was linked ricbt there but they did not know it. They never knew it until the \jn whi iJe blew and tie Harvard herds poured down over the turf of 'he 1'uie howl in a wild dance of vu-tory. O'llearn and Jordan lock d their jaws like the bulldog which Ynie team have been likened to in the past. Two and three yards at a time they tore through the Harvard line with the impetus of that first touchdown against a great rival only supermen could have opened holes in the Harvard forward wall. The Y'ale line men did it. Jordan notoriously slow pot bis lunges up to the line when the holes were opened for the first time this season. O'Hearn. who ought to bave been directing the Veam smashed into the Harvard de- K fense for fain after gain. The ball was planted finally on Harvard's eight-yard line. There the attack halted. Tae opened h r forward passing attack in an effort to overcome 'the Crimson lead. O'Hearn and Neidlinger worked beautifully together and Jordan smased into the line to gain the needed yards for first down. Tbe Harvard wall was firm however and O'Henrn drojpped back and accounted for the only Yale- score with a beautiful field goal tbe half en.'V'd with Harvard in the lead to 3. i Resume Hard Attack. Tn the third period Jordan and i'Hearn resumed their longing at tack on the Crimson line. Time nfter time they almost won' clear. Time after time. Harvard regained the ball and punted out of danger. The final punch that' would hare sent the Blue Jerseys surging over the Harvard goal lint war lacking. In desperate 'straits. Yule opened np with an aerial attack but while at times tbe pasoes went true the most dangerous effort sailed into the Crimson dad arms of Le the Haryard quarter and the ball flew off Hammond's foot out of danger. In th last quarter Harvard se- nire Jn the margin of advantage opened np on hef own account and slash after slasi'went knifing into the tiring -Tale Jln Down the field they inarched -nntil the Tale ID-yard line wa beneath their cleats. Then ObeAe fmttblefc Pfaffimw. certain of faet .wag called from.the" ti de lines. F Cfctl ftwrj CehraCjRg jti aKi i.iii-r vsc' 4 -Ji.--ri-jfct- v Tigers Who Will Fape Jackets Thanksgiving Day Here are tlie Auburn Timers undefeated by southern foes who will battle the equally victorious Tech Yellow Jackets .it 'rut field Thursday. On the top row left to right are Bov" Pruitt Auburn's right end and one of the best flankmen in the south Lawrence center Wynne a guard Peirce le tackle Kegan left guard. Left to right on the bottom are" Charlie Gibson quarterback Captain "John Barleycorn" Shirey who is expected to prove a tough nut for the Jacke to crack "Fliyver" Ford whose work in the Centre g helped the Tiger to victory Grisrum righ tackle Ed Shirling generally regarded as the handsomest tool\iil pu. uuth and incidentally one of the best. On the extreme right in this row is "Slick' Moulton who fell on the ball that gave the Tigers their victory over Centre. The pictures were nu.le 1-v a Constitution staff"photographer. Hard row game Oglethorpe Is Defeated By Florida Gator 1 Duncan Proves Big Star BY PAUL WARWICK. Outweighed mightily and outplayed sliehtly the Oglethorpe I'eireU were compelled to fold their tired wmis in serene acquiescence to defeat at 1'onoe de I etin park Saturday after- noon while the invading total ton- naze from the University of Florida scored 111 points and held the local scoreless. Florida's riht end Dun- I can did tbe dirty dozen. I Albei Duncan did the lainae by I deliberately d.xl-ring the doed dei fcnse while within OgletLorpe's 20- yard line most of the credit- for the victory thould go to Newton halfback from our southern sister state whose gains and triple threat potentialities were responsible for the in roads into Ozlethurpe's territory. The largest ful.bark on record if tliere is i any record on earth big enoush to j hold him started the game for Florida j and plouehed considerably but the seeming impossible was accomplished and he was knocked out.before the third period had become history. He weighs 220 pounds on buying i scales. j Ozletborpe tossed away two excellent chances to score from the i 1 three-yard line by attempting to tun- j n l through the mountain of flesh and bones that was Florida's line. rather than essay a snappy little dash around end or flick forwerd 1 pass. It looked like bad judgment. but might not have been. Who knows It was too cold to think and an end run might have turned into i 1 an ineffective icicle. One of these i chances mrae in the first two minutes of play and the other arrived in i the third period. The first ended with an attempted kick from plarr- meat by Jake Morris the other with I an attempted forward pass. Both were just attempts. I i Florida's scoring was done in the second and fourth periods both touch-i downs coming on identical plays from practically the same distance from the Petrel's goal line. Duncan scored both on well-executed triple pass" the' same old play that hns seen Red Barron. Jimmy Brewster. Strupp r and Buck Flowers get awny for lengthy I spurts on Grant field. i For the most part the gam was devoid of thrills but not of chills. Maurer showed his uncnnny speed on Severn occasion by bumfs around the Florida flunks but hi opportunities to run 'Vith the ball were for rnme reason few and far between. Kilgore was plunging with great drive and put his team within scoring distance in the first half Ed David played an excellent defensive game as did Corliss nnd Crowe to gpeak not at all of the timen when the speedy Maurer sped all the way from his safety position to throw the Florida ruftner behind the line of scrimmage. Newton as has been intimated was tbe wheel horse of the invader Dash after dash be dished out. gaining always through the Petrel for wards to be stopped only after a 8 or 8-yard getaway. Yet there were no long rung to keep tbe stands from freezing. In fact outside of the. record low temperature reached by the writer's feet. Newton's playing was th outstanding feature of the came. Dieksoo Stan. Dickson he's so big it Is hard to write about him. But Dickson. rained many yards by simply running np to .the line of'scrimmage and falling I against it Scientist would lik to to shoot the wetT-known "iinmovable object" bowtinj o2' into space. Just by leaning up ugainst it. I epite tii pii dTous gentlemen who opposed them Odetliorpe accounted Ljr ten first downs. Florida pot siitPen of the thin th.it ive the linesmen exercise Florida con' plcted five forward passes for a total distance of bO yards OsIethorp five for 42 yards. Florida fizzled on them seven time Oglethorpe six. Florida dazzled the spectators by the simple expedient of coming out Ln the open from the bowels of the grandstand. Clad in lurid oranse colored jerseys their huge bulk looming like a w iking flock of army trucks they presented an interesting study in massed color. Their jerseys were the most colored thinzs ever seen on a local field. Nothing quiet about them they probably account in a lar f measure for the comparatively low score Harvard ran up. That and the fact that Harvard must have exercised rare self-control if the weath er was as unkind to Floridans at Cambridge as it was on 1'once tie Leon park. Knew Who to Tackle. To add to the sublimity of tbeir attire the Florida team had a large "Florida" blazoned across the flame- colored expanse of their jerwys' chests. Oglethorpe always knew who to tackle. But the inevitable drive of the Florida team should work them up a good nickname of some sort before long tike the Ornnge 'Crush or somethinj like that. The Ofilethorpe student body was ont in force and kept up a continual screech. Between the halves they snnketdanced all over&Jr. Lynch'g new outfield. A freshman sitting near this reporter in the stands got up and left the lady he was escorting for the full intermission. Couldn't be bothered with gallantry and etiquette and matters of that sort while his colleagues were piercisinj tbeir larynies. Tech's cheer leaders should send out a couple of scouts to se Oglethorpe work. Wop Roman might also scont the Petrel bund for it keeps constantly in full blare. Which reminds us that Tech is at a big disadvantage next year because they play Ojlethorpe tbe first game of the season and won't have the opportunity to scout them. But the athletic association will not get very good result if it scouted the crowd that greeted the Petrels Saturday afternoon. At- janta should have given this plucky institution a better turnout it seems. Shift Ineffective. Florida used a backfield shift that wraed no more effective than the usual steady formations which was about the only out-of-the-ordinary feature of their play. Their long passes were rarely of much avail but tbeir short forward and lateral passes worked with good effect. Just as usual Ogletborpe biougbt out one interesting formation on defense which seems capable of development. Varnados holding the flank several yards out rushes In either to dump th opposition or to cross the field for forward pass reception. The play bad deluding effect on Florida at leant once Saturday. Newton Florida' star passes weH runs well and did the punting after hefty Dicksoo bad left the came. Al though not particnlJLrly spectacular with his runs he shifty reverses bia field with ran jndjTaent and U OTBALL RESU Chii-ag" \VM-i in 0 tie I. Buckneii. 'JO Kut erK in. Notre I ani U Carnegie Tech. 0. Johns Hopkins 1C St. Johns lAn- ujpolisi. 7. Purdue T Indiana. 7 tie Muhienberg 21) Fordham. 20 lie .Svvartbiuort1 2i Haverford 2. St. Ignatius. 13 Wilmington 9. Maryland. 54 Catholic L' 0. Gettysburg. 15 Lebanon Valley. 0. Maryland. 54 Catholic University 0. Buckneii. 20 Kutgers. 13. I'niversity of Detroit 20 \V. and J. P. Boston University. 20 Tufts 0. Dartmouth 7 Brow n 0. Ohio Northern tl Case 7. Lafayette 3 Lehigh 0. Ohio State. (5 Illinois o. Deniwn. 13 Wesleyan H. Michigan Aggies 45 Massachus- ctts Aggies i. Boston College. 0 Georgetown 0. I Harvard 10 Yale j Howard. 9 Birmingham Son. 7. Pennsylvania Military 0 Western Maryland 0. Nebraska. 4 Ames 6. Florida 12 Ogletborpe. 0. I A. and M. 6 Drake 48. j Wabasb. 30 Depauw 0. Alabama. 10 GwrEia C. t East Lansing Michigan Aggies 45 Massachusetts Aggies 0. I Chester Pa. Pennsylvania Milita ry 0 Western Maryland 0. Durham N. C. Trinity 20 Randolph-Macon 12. Iowa City Iowa 37 Northwest era 3. Urbana Ills. Ohio State 6 Illi nois 3. Minneapolis Michigan 16 Minnesota 7. Haverhill Catholic High of Philadelphia 6 St. James of Haverhill 6. TWO CONFERENCE TEAMS TIED IN RACE- Chicago November 25. The University of Iowa western conference football champions of 1921 closed their 1922 season today undefeated with the additional glory of a victory over Yale. They were tied for the honor of being undefeated in the Big Ten race by Michigan also unbeaten this season. The University of Chicago was eliminated from the triple tie today when tbe University of Wisconsin held them to a scoreless tie. Wisconsin the stumbling block to Chicago's hopes ranks fourth in the conference standing the Badgers baring been beaten by Illinois-and Mrthigan The rest of the teams to order are Minnesota Illinois Northwestern. Ohio State. Indiana and Purdue It is Ohio State's lowest ranking In many years their victory over Illinois today being their only conference win this season. Purdue kept Indiana in the column of unbroken defeats today by a 7 to 7 tie. Northwestern's only victory was overi Purdue but Northwestern held Minnesota to an early season tie 7 to 7. Kerr After Comeback. Fort Worth Texas November 23. Dick K rr former White Sox pitcher told friend be bad applied for re instatement with tha Chicago Ameri cans following a Uy-cff becautt of alary differtncta. Gr nvilic Otio Denison 13 YVe leyan -4. Boston Boston College 0 George town 0. Greenville S. C. Furman 20 Clciiisua ti. Gettysburg Gettysburg 1C Leba non Valley 0. Lafayette Ind. Purdue 7 Indi ana 7. Washington Maryland 54 Catholic University 0. At Denver. Colorado School of Mines O. University of Colorado lii. At Culver Ind. Culver Military academy 44 tiose Polytechnic iffsti- tute 0. At Stanford T'niversity Calf.rCcli- i fornia 2 Stanford C. Baltimore Johns Hapkins 16 St. 'Johns Annapolis 7. i Stagg jFeld Chicago 0 Wiscon- i sin 0. Cleveland St Ignatius Cl Wilmington 9. Allentown Pa. Muhlenburg 20 Fordhnm 20. Haverford Pa. Swarthmore 25 Haverfnrd 2. Heidleberg 33 Western Reserve 12. Wocwter. 43 Mtiskingiim. 0. St. Louis r. 2S Loyolln 0. Xaviera. 32 Otterbein. -0. University of Mississippi 13 Ben- nine. 14. Heighten 33 Nebraska- Wesley an 13. Missouri School of Mines 6 Uni versity of Tennessee Medical college 54. Roanoke college. 63 Elon. 6. Wilmington Light Infantry 22 Fort Brnpc 0. Wake Forest 0 North Carolina j State 32 I Wabnsh. 30 Depfluw 0. Nebraska M Ames fl. GRID DOPESTERS MISS BADLY IN EAST New York November 25. Gridiron dope already badly upset this season took a complete somersanlt today from an eastern viewpoint in a majority of leading battles. Harvard's smashing 10-3 victory over Yale which was on the Ions end of pre-game odds led the form re versals. Dartmouth beaten by Vermont. Cornell and Harvard came back with a sensational 7-O triumph over Brown the Crim on'scon jneror. Washinetnn and Jefferson a heavy 'favorite was crushed by Detroit 'university 20 to 9 but Notre Dame in another inter-sectional clash ran conspicuously true to form in beating Carnegie Tech 19 to 0. I XaFayettefandtthe Army narrowly averted upsets in two other leading f encounters the former barely defeat- j ing its traditional rival Lehich 3 to i 0 while the cadets staged a whirlwind finish to overcome the Navy 17 to 14 for the first time since 1916. Neither Boston college nor Georgetown was able to score in a game at Boston in which for the greater part of tbe time tbe local team was favored with most of the breaks. McHcnry III. Cincinnati November 25. Austin McHenry outfielder of. the St. Louis Cardinal was "reported lerioiwljr ill. Army Team Stages Rally In Final Period Wfnning Over Middies 17 to 14 j Philadelphia. Pa. November 25. Playing true to the season's form the Army football eleven' defeated their old rivals tbe Navy on Franklin held tfxiay by the scwre of 17 to 14. in a hard clean gridiron struggle. Tbe wore represented two touchdowns and a field goal for the Army and two tour-hd wns fur the Navy all of them hard-earned. The raid- sbipmen were not without honor in defeat fnr they played a fame that was worthy of any team that hns oome out of Annapolis in years. Kntering the came with West Pointers ns tlie fnvoritps. the Annapolis crew foucht their way to the front and finally went under after a bitter Mrucglr. Sinythp. the Army quarterback was the f-tar of tlie game. His running with the ball and his forward passine was surpassingly good. Barcfaet the sterling Navy star played well while be was in the pam but Norris hi sn esor was easily the outstanding figure of the Navy lineup. He was used mtirli in the latter part of the game and was in every play. Fifty-five thousand persons saw the contest. The president of the United Mates was represented by Vice President Coolidge. Secretary of War Woeks and General Pershing rooted for the Army and Secretary of the Navy Den by and Assistant Secretary Roosevelt were among the navy cohorts. Having defeated the Army in the last three years it looked like another naval victory in the first two periods as th juidshipmen outplayed the cadets. The West Pointers were unabte to penetrate the Navy's line wiiile the- Navy had no trouble in punching holes in the forwards of the Army. In the second period the Navy used its aerial attack which resulted in the first score of the game a touchdown by McKee. A bad pass thew the Navy back for a big loss and the midshipmen were forced to kick. Then Smythe made a short run that put the ball within striking dis tance and Garbisch booted a placement goal over the bar for the Army's first score against th Navy since 1910- Army Takes Lead. The Army took tbe lend in the third period on a touchdown by Wood but the Navy again forged to tlie front in the final period with a touchdown by Conroy. Then the cadets won the game in the gathering darkness on a hard-earned touchdown. The Navy started the usual footbMl tactics by making desperate efforts to score on forward passes but Army succeeded in breaking up the play many times. During the fkst period the midshipmen came within striking distance of tbe Army goal but Conroy failed at a placement kick. In the second period it was the Navy's bnll oa the Army's 34-yard line. McKee passed to Taylor who. was brought down 13 yards short of the Army goal line. McKee was again given the ball and this time he shot around the left aide of the West Point line for the first score of the game. Barshel made tot extra point Securing tbe ball near midfield the Army returned td tbe attack and after' failing to open up tbe Nary line Garbisch was called upon for a placement goal from'the 48- rard-line. and mad it easily. Tlie third period was foil of action. Getting the1 ball and running it back to the Navy's 30-yard line Smythe tossed a forward pass to White who dodged his way to within two yards of the Navy goal. The midshipmen momentarily held amid intense excitement but on the nett play Wood shot across for the Army's first touchdown. Garbisch made the eitra point. Catches Long Pass. In tbe final period Carr of the Navy caught a long forward pass nnd was downed on West Point's 23-yard line. The ball was worked on short forward pasM-s and line plunges to tbe Army one-yard line where Conroy went over for th Navy's last touchdown. Norris kicked the eitra point after he was tackled by the Army forwards. Smythe was the hero of tbe Army's second touchdown. Receiving a ki.-k off from Cullen of tbe Navy. he ran the ball back 50 yards to the Navy's 13-yard line. A five-yard penalty momentarily set the Army back. They kept plugging away and finally 1 Smythe xburlod a forward pass to Tiaiberlake who shot across the line with the winning score. Smythe matfe the extra point on a placement kick making the final score 17 to 14. The Llnenp. ARMY (17) Pos. NAVY (14) D. Storck l.e Parr Mullicnn l.t Bollos Breidster l.g Cnmey Garbisch c Matbews Farwick r.g Winkjcr Goodman r.t Clyde White. r.e Taylor Smvthe q Conrov TTimbcrlake l.h Cullen Dodd r.b McKee i Wood f.b Barchet Score by periods I Navy 0 7 0 7-/14 Army 0 3 7 7-M7 Scoring Touchdowns Wood. Tim- berl.tlte McKce Conmy extra points Oaxbiscb 'Smythe. BHrcber Norris placement kicks placement goal. Gnrbisch Referee Ed Thorpe Ln-1 Ralle umpire Crowford Bowdoin field jadge. Kersberg Harvard head i linesman Walter Okeyon Lehigh Time of periods 15 minutes. YALE ALUMNI IN PARIS TOAST OLD HARVARD Paris November 23. The mighty yell that went np from Harvard -throats at the Yale bowl this after noon had a hearty echo in France when the bulletin telling of Harvard's victory over her ancient rival was read to a gathering of alumni just 19 minutes after the last whistle blew 1n New Haven. Yale men wbo also had dined In 'anticipation of s change of Yale luck received the sad news about tbe same time and there was deep ilence. But soon some one of a philosophic turn of mind eald "Well we'll beat Vm next year and-as a means of revenge I raggest we pledge a toasf to Dear Old Harvard. And they did. I After both dubs bad recovered 'Harvard from Joy and Tale from poom tbe/ exchanged creetinjs. LONG RUK FEATURES J IT Georgia'e Chance for Vic tory Spoiled in FinafM Quarter When Alabama Recovers Fumble. li v BY HOMER GEORGE. Montgomery Abu November 23. S Special. Outplaying Georgia in all. parts of tbe game but going against f a bitter hard working defense Alabama. defeated the Bulldogs here thi Si afternoon after a most gruelling batti by a score of 10 to C. Georgia made a valiant fight but lacked tht via and dash which have characterized her play in the past few games and went down acknowledging that the- best team today won. It was a brilliant contest on Ala bama's part and she easily and surely deserved the victory. She fought terrifically at all stages of the struggle showed a fine varied attack and simply rushed Georgia off her feet. That is tbe whole story and nothing less can describe it. The thin red line was better than the Georgia line nod the backs were more effective than the Georgia backs. The Bulldogs never gave up tta struggle and pounded and fought to the bitter end. They were fine in their ricfeat. but Alabama was great rr. Alabama came from behind though at all times showing better end scored' after a brilliant attack around the ends and through tlie line finally taking the ball over for th first score on her part by superb line playing. Irresistible Attack. Alabama was a gieA team today just as her followers insisted she would be. She had a dash and go about her attack which was well nijii irresistible and on defense played uiajmifw-ntlj. She was a far better' team than at any time this season. except when she played against Pennsylvania. There was just no stopping her tuday. On the other band. Jfae was able to stop Georgia most of tlu time. Georgia bad a great chance to Wl4 in the fourth quarter but a fnmblt by Fletcher which an alert Alabama man fell on robbed her of that chance. The balKwas on the Alabama 5-yard line where it had been" carried bjf j series of fine plays mostly throutli the line off tackle. Hiat was th only time Georgia geemed to be going as ghe had been against Auburn Vir 1 ginia and Vanderbilt and it looked like .t winning touchdown up- ta tha fumble. The finest thing about the garni wa the superb attack of Alabama. kept the score down to the low nonir Srl bcr of points which was the final re "s/fj i suit. lier plays were varied and de I ceptive and it took tie most alert rand fine playing to keejf her.to on touchdown and a field goal. Georgia showed herself splendid in that magnificent defense. i BrUfiant Work. The play was marked by briDlant work on the part of each team. The Alabama victory can be safely credited' to superior work however Especially was this true in the fine end ran- nine of her backs the tremendous line pluntring and the excellent forward passing game ehe showed. Variety and deceptiveness marked her offense considerably more than tiaM the case with the Georgia boys For one thing Georgia showed the effects of her paralyzing game againt Virginia and Vanderbiltw As I said this morning the team to show the worse effects from the cripple Hit would lose and Georgia easily showed those effects. This ia not said as aa apolpz.v for tbe play by the Georgans for they covered themselves with clory though beaten. I On the other hand tbe Alabama I I substitutes for her cripples played i magnificently. The -sick men were kept out of tbe game and In their I places went boys who seemed imbued i. with a great Hrength and spirit as if they had their own strength and that of the men whose places they took. i It was inspiring tbe way they re- eronded to the call of the thousand i of Alabamans in the stands. j Possibly the outstanding star' o l the Alabama team was Stumpy Bart- .r lett. who accounted for all of the If j points made by his team. He Shot unerring judgment in the runninjf ui i his tram's plays and was tremendous jj on the attack himself. He made many fine craing both through the line and around the ends his work surpassing that of any individual in play unksj. that of John Fletcher for Georgia. r Hubert Stars. But Bartlett. as fine as his work proved him to be was by no aeanav" alone when it came to brilliancy..Hu i bcrt the plunging fullback was simV ply tremendous and figured as macn a i Bartlett in the outcome. It wa heartsickenin to the Georgia .root era to eee Hubert fO at that -liM Alabama waa wild about it. but It smashed the heart of many a Georgia man when he'would be given tba balR McCartee another back waa' altar' rplendid on the attack. He ran welt held his feet and generally dizplayea e football ability worthy of AIaL bama's finest traditions. In the Jlfl y fllmost every Alabama man was in fine form but tbe work of Comptoni Hovator and Clemens stands out fa the limelight. It wan Clemens-who- got the ball when Fletcher fumbled cs' the Alabama 5-yard line goin at'.ljj Jike a streak of liettninz wheft it Cur' from the Georgia baek's arms. x p5 The most magnificent figure-nJ- the Georgia skk was that rrand halfir back. Job Fletcher. The Tiftoif bo s was heroic both 'on the offense ead 5 defense. He it was whose Jalertnem. on the defenw smashed lntovtbe'Ja f and grabbed the ball on his four. yard line when McCartee fumbted-i With only one man setting' tocluffl he ran the 08 yards for.a'ltonchi down stiffarminif a wnld-be.1 tack ler. and ontsprintinjr all the-punrur .i who -went after Mm like pack fof.j wolres. At aH times he played P nj flidly and Jiis work ln.thla kamfQiriH-f plnw his name high- on the trptt jofe tbost who- hare r v n touch fot'Georiss na/He always battling B Jalning almost" erer/ time htv eivea the ball and displaying ability on tt defensive pl y.i Mnlvihill .played kn excellent at ay times hHe.Banda.ll'w Continued ColoaaB'S. VOL LV. No 166. ATLANTA GA. SUNDAY MORNING NOVEMBER 26 1922. 1' EO GIAnALL BEF RE TTA K O AL I I Harva rd P lling on lu"ers Y leB ildogs FINE DASH S daJ.-Yale bi eH n nl tb ridiron PI' l'rincPton. Jio \1jhi an. f.Jpf Cted l se 'a wiln r n f 1nn ame Qual' Pr. stren h th chnn e e mo t tart I yard fJl' h Wa" of hi riJ ra da h oal. d ed elu ed ll8i e. 1' 'ist ni dod n l. R nninj1 kne s witb dri. reJdealed a one W rh almn t I where f CriInS n la t sma an gllne l Th I t -as .the goa cros. eJ. ro Bw 1I ha cr r.plM f l'pa n 1 out fi d an rp ere 8 na j' 't a nJ bs ju..t np nN p8..t de perae I' n-p f..r ne l T..ae t a f" lI' lry. o 'r""U \i'-r wudJriown f P'1t r -I o glih rin nt jri tn k ppt pnjy "n in tween r ht tb y i w t Je pturp Ih If ml dan "tory. yar s tb' 'ith im etus toul'u own ha e ot irectin sf tel' hpr overcome'tbe Crim Qn tolt tb"r yar wa toa en. d .i Rt51 Dt lun ng Cr ml'On the. urg DI wa- PUI' th the tb h wn' a nnt I line. ntil l 'Jrd owa. tm 1blf'd. f from t1Je- IlcJe .t9lr' \1iN' j t. of i tFl :1 F e I I I I i I i g r f i Ft. 'M" th Ti er ech jit ri ht. ri ht e are "FI ver" II inci entaIly W staff photographer. -O i l'etr UI COIIlp 'IIPt Win. a'ltie cen e e at LPtHI "l lIie tota rDl."r itv 1 T1'Jp I I Xewt n t rpspon ihle in- rd bi t' ame d eemin imrn sibl accoIIlpli he out .bdore pound3-on buy in t pd nel 'and -as i ut ha f ve i ci i nte t fo t i i theotber 1 th i Iorri. I wa th i Jjn r A 'IPfo-the. Rer-j R Jrk H 3Y I flelt I ga 'l\"BII\ 'I tbrillbut 1I\ d IleVirRl o'u onll I hi" ith bet"l eet1,1 scor.1 I I at. I bo onJ r I't' the DicklOn-he's Dick8\JDpined man tunnl .the. 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" ' . . ! ! : / , , ; , . , , ; / : ; . ! , " . . . \ : . + : + ; [ ) \ \ ' . . ' . ' - . , . , - - : - ' - - . ( - \ - , , ' - - . , . ' ' - - . ' - ( ) - " ' . ! - - ) " . ' . ) - ; . - . ' ' ' - ( ' . ( - - ? , . ' ' - ( ' ! - - ( . , ' ; . , . , . ; . ' - , ' ' _ . - - - * . \ ' \ ' _ _ . . - - ' _ _ : _ _ . - % ' . / , - , ' . ' ° " : / ; . , : . . * ' " ' . } : . , . ' - - . - * : ) ; : ' . : , _ ' - ' ' - - ' ' - - - , . - , . ( ' , ' - - ? ; - - - . . . ' . ; ' , ( . . ( ) - _ . ' - ( ) - - . - . . - - - - * ; _ _ _ _ _ ( \ , . . ( - - " ( ' ' ) ' ) _ , ; , - ) ( . - ' ¶ \ , - - - ' - - - ' . . . ' , - & , - - . - - ) ( ( ' - ' - . , - - . . ' ' , - [ ' . ' - - * . - . - . - - . . : . . . . . . ' , - . ° . - . ' ' ' ' , ' - \ ( ; ) - * , ' - , ' . - . ' ' . - . ' ' - , . ° . \ : ' . - . ' ) ' , ' ' ' . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' - . . - - ( . ' - , . - , ) - , . . . . . . . . ' : " . . , . . . . 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