The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia on November 13, 1898 · Page 22
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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 22

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Sunday, November 13, 1898
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Page 22
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r v -v- xc- r-3' Sj. 093aBi. T f THB COKSTIXU IOK ATLA T 1898. l Iti8eofjia. Bojijeie Unabls to Hold TdeiStag Oppooeiiioil 'irae andHgain ttal'Trait t STOOD 44 TO 0 faheejste fit Best Team TJiejHaye Hid fo Tim KORK WAS WONDERFUL Carolina at th Opening of the Game Carried the Georgia Team Off Its Feet and the University Kan Seemed To Loso Heart Macon Ga November 12 Special. WJlth an assurance of victory that amounted almost to a conviction Oeorcla cam out of tbe North Carolina game today with the most crushing defeat la ber history. It was a North Carolina day tn Macon for S e boys wearing th blue and white wept th Georgia eleven off 1U feet before the baa bad fairly been put In play and by successive bucks and end runs kept the oral moving until Carolina bad nine touchdowns to her credit with the splendid rec ord added thereto of eight prettily kicked coals It was all over with Georgia after five mtmtfes of play and the bearers of the red and black who but 8. few moments before were buoyant witb the hope of final victory settled down Into a slovenly despond- cot mood that has no part la football and wilch cast damper over tha adherents of Georgia In every part of the field North Carolina has th best team the college has put on th gridiron In many rears made op In the mala of lightweight men. b t who have bad splendid training and can be counted on to bold up the reputation of the Institution In their coming game with Virginia. Encouraged by the recent victory over Tanderbflf s team la tWs city Georgia's team assumed a confident attitude that was not dispelled by the news that came In the way of rumors that North Carolina was a usuaJly strong and the team otherwise aTgood one took it for granted that the visitor would fall an easy prey to their .aulck work. The quick work around the ends that won the game for Georgia against Vanderbllt did not materialize In the game'today for the Carolina team started off wltb a rush and whirl that completely unnerved their opponents smashed through the center with a force that nothing on the field could stop aod the Georgians were barely given breathing time before the battery started again. Tha Georgia coaches on the side lines called on their men to pull together exhorted them to make one last defense and held o& the scanty hope to them that by so do- Ing they would turn the tide of the game but it waa all to no effect. The men had lost heart la their work completely and nothing could bring them back to their normal defense. Tfcep expected to win out and do It by a handsome score and when North Carolina started off with a gallop the very first time the ball was put In play the team became F O ROGERS CAPTAIN A I KTLTJZ And Quarter Back of the North Caro- Manager and End of the North Carolina 3 Una a. bewildered and seemed to lose Its head- work. The team work of the North Carolinians Is flhe best seen to tfca south this season. The men formed up for offensive work with a vim and alacrity disheartening to the Georgian and the force of their Interference wherever the signal directed was more than the Athens boys could stand up against How the Game Opened. Carolina showed her band at the toss-up of the two captains and Rodgers of North Carolina winning the toss at once chose the goal and left Georgia witfc. the ban. This was just what Carolina wanted for Coach Reynolds counted on putting the ball into play first and by the fierceness of his attack throw the Georgia team off its feet and then keep the men rattled until Carolina had enough points to insure ber victory. Tlhe scheme a rella of the Princeton gridiron worked on the Georgia boys and after three minutes of actual play the astonished Georgians found the ball behind their goal line In the arms of a Carolina man. The mass of red and Wn v vu WJO BKIS lines groaned with despair and the scanty sprinkling of blue and wtijfe yelled with annoying Insistence to the broken-hearted majority. What happened in the first three mlnjites of playuontinued until the end of the first faalf. and wiben time was called for the rest of ten minutes the Georgia team came off to their quarters with- tine dismal knowledge that Carolina had crossed their goal line by hard football four times The men were subjected to a lecture from Coach McCarthy that under ordinary circumstances It Is said would have made their hair stand on end and the indignant coadh finally wound up his talk with the statement that the team would enter the second half of tlhe game with a new set of backs behind the line Here it Is believed. Georgia made ber greatest mistake. The team had literally been run over by the Carolinians but it stood to reason that substitutes could not hold Hie fast visitors if toe regular team could not Uclntosh the left halfback wtoo had toeld his own In tackling in the first half was taken out During tlhe twenty-five minutes of play he had made several splendid tackles and be had missed some but with It all Ms work was above the THE EARLY BIRD CATCHES THE WORM. Those who are here early to morrow morning will have first and best choice of several bargains in each of our departments. Here are some exceptional values Boys' strong calf lace Shoes an excellent yalue sizes 12 to 2 worth $2 hut now they are only Boys' Russia calf lace Shoes splendid style sizes 2 1-2 to 5 reduced from $2.50 to only Men's best calf-skin cork sole lace Shoes our regular $5 shoe now cut to 0J Aft 04-.UU only. "Ladies' kid button extension or turned soles regular prices from $2.50 to $5 as they are small sizes 1 to 3 we sell them at Large Girls' calf-skip spring heel lace Shoes sizes 2 1-2 to 5 really worth $2 and $2.50 now they go at $1,60 Ladies' fine kid button extension or turned soles common sense style reduced from $3 to only WRITE FOR OUR NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE It's Yours for the Asking. average of the team. iTcCutcheon cam out He had not donemuch la the first i&alf but his defensive work Is looked upon as superior to many of his associates and h wssaeaiftmantokwpatend. In place of Uclntosh Hkks waa put In the game auditor McCufcnecn Lyndon" was sub stituted During the'-last half Lyndon tackled w U and held'-op nls end In'Very good shape. f f 5. The only redeeming feature of the Georgia play was. the tackHng of. the quarterback. Huff. Huff played back and while he was la the game never failed to stop bis-man. His chance were numerous for the Carolinians broke through the entire line at times and the runner behind splendid ln terfereno came down to Huff at full speed. Tbe prucky little quarter never lost bis last hope and Jones falls tack to-response to the signal. Tie ball satis off for thirty yards and Rodger catches. McRae smashes around left end for ten yards and Graves becks tha line tauten more Austin takes the ball for a Journey f tees yard around right eud-and is prettily tackled by Mclntosh. The ball is again dangerously near Georgia- goat line but the boys from Athens seem unable to stop to onslaught of -tiro Carolinian "With the ball on-the. five-yard line- Graves taxes It through the center for a touchdown and Gregory kicks the goal. Score Carolina 10'Georgia XL for t rt of th 'n t half tbe Carolina team never lets iqk wltthe fast wnrk they toavestartedand the Georgians begin to see that It Is allow with h nu Austin with &l ball sxaia on Die Georgia goal line broaghtrther yr bard and fast football playing carries it-over'for the third touchdown and dregorjr has 'no dlffl- culfy In kicking thelsolJ. QeorgU Has tfle aatlsfaction f klcktag off and with the bsjl nearly in the center of the neld Carolina plunges away at th line and dives around the ends f ir long and constant gains. Atstln gets five yards through center. Graves four yards through guard and McBae is held down on an end run to one yard. Graves here takes "the ball Into the line for twelve yards and the center men of the Carolina team open up a great bole for him to pass through. The ban Is now pn Georgia's three-yard line and Graves dives through for the required aistance. Gregory for the fourth time kicks goal. w f Second Half Begins. The changes that nave been made la the formation iff Qeorglas hacks are seen at a glance to have been of no advantage. In the first half Carolina only secured four touchdowns but In the last half she gets five Carolina begins the second half with a kick which is caught by Jones. Cox who has gone In at right halfback loses one yard in a try around end. Huff calls for kick and Jones sends the ball down the field for thirty-five yards Rodgers secures it and makes a pretty run gaining from twenty to twenty-five yards by the effort. Graves goes at center and gets ten yards. Here Carollnr makes a series of. pretty end runs and the ball once In the center of JOSEPH STRAE. H. C GREGORY Half Back of the North Carolina End of the North Carolina Team nerve and every time the runner was-downed He was too light for the -work he was called on to do. however for at every fall the Carolina man would pull him along for three and five yards. In the early part of the second half tie was thrown heavily while tackling Howell who was speeding away for the goal and his Injury was such that he waa compelled to leave the game His place was taken In the defensive work by Hicks and on the offensive by Cox For North Carolina no man can be given credit for the victory over -Georgia for the team worked together like so much1 ma chinery and the result was accomplished not by the efforts of one man. but by all eleven. The work of Howell. the fast halfback has never l een surpassed on any southern college team He had good In terference to aid him but at the end of several of his long runs wUen the men who were protecting him had been scattered he was a power in himself and dived forward through the mass of Georgia men for ten and fifteen yards Graves at fullback and iRodgers. at quarter both played fine games The latter handled the ball wth ac curacy and lightning speed and always bad a cheering word for bis men. How Carolina Won. The park in Macon was well filled with spectators at the time the game was called this afternoon. There were the football cranks from Athena who are said never to miss a Georgia game a delegation from Mercer &a wearing Georgia colors and hundreds of others In tha grand stand who bad never seen an Intercollegiate football game before. All were interested and all with few exceptions wished success to Georgia. The two teams arrived at the park about the same time and engaged in a few preliminary passes wihlle the two captains were arranging the details. The betting was even and there was considerable Geor gia money that no one would cover The game started with the understanding that it was to be conducted under the rules of the Southern Intercollegiate Association although North Carolina Is not a member of the association. Later it developed that Georgia received fhe worst end of the agreement and Captain Walden kicked against the enforcement of one of the rules of the new guide that compelled him to band over the ball to North Carolina although It waa in the possession of one of his own men. The Qama Begins. Captain Rodgers wins the toss and chooses the goal in the direction of the wind Georgia's men line in the center of the field for a kick off and the referee a whistle sounds for ine game to begin. Jones kicks thirty-five yards and Rodgers catches the ball and galna ten yards before he is downed. Austin is sent around right end for fifteen yards. Graves plunges through center for five yards and Georgia begins to wonder wfhat is the matter. McRae be hind solid interference dives around left end for ten yards The ball Is eoon on Georgia's fifteen-yard line and here the home team makes a rally for a moment but i thrown aside without much effort by the powerful interference. The Georgia men are unable for some reason to get unaer the line of men advancing with the runner and Graves by a plunge througb guard carries the oval to Georgia's five- yard line. McRae fans to gain anything around left end but ahull the heavy tackle Is given the ball and carries it over the tine. Behind the goal be drops the oval but Gregory as quick as lightning falls on it and secures the first toudhdown for North Carolina. Cteorgi "Weakens. Gregory kicks an easy goal and Carolina carries the ball back to the center of the field for a kick off. Mclntosh catches a difficult kick and carries the ball five yards before being thrown. Mclntosbtis thrown into the line and the plucky tack carries the bide three yards. Another atlejipt by Georgia to rain around the end i without effect save t give the man with the ball some valuable experience. Huff signs for a- kick as th the field is agaiqjm Georgia's five yard line. McRae smashes into the line and carries the ball over for the fifth .teuchdown. Gregory kicks a difficult gOa M the score Is. Caro lina 23 Georgia 0 Georgia is wholly unable to get under the interference and often when the weight of one man would throw tha whole mass there is no one to go under. During ibis half the work of DuBignon improves Che end getting in several difficult tackles with no one to aid him. Lyndon does good work throwing himself vjclously against the heavy line of Carolina's Interference and makes several pretty stops. At this taint of the game Howell calls off around right end and makes thirty yards. He Is finally tackled by Huff who is hurt and hae to leave tlhe game. His place is taken by Cox and Young goes to right halfback. Graves dives through the line for ten yards and Howell takes the ball around right end for a touchdown. Bcore Caro lina 30 Georgia 0 Georgia is never able to keep the ball the men bitting the line like tthey are taking medicine and consequently gain only a yard or two or are thrown back with a loss. Howell continues to make trlUlant end runs and whenever given the ball generally makes from ten to fifteen yards. The seventh touchdown is scored by How-ell. who plunges through the line for tbe first time from Georgia s four-yard line. Gregory here misses the first goal if the game and Ohe score for Carolina Is M. Jones kicks off and Howell gets the ball returns the kick. Cox gets the oval on the bound outside of tlhe lines and the referee gives it to Carolina Rodgers goes out of the game and bis place is taken by Martin. Mclver takes the place of ShuTl During the latter part of this half Georgia secures the boil on Vanderbllta twenty-five-yard line and Jones falls back for a try at goal from the flelu. the only vutuiue me u orgians uave of scoring Jones kicks too low and the ball is block ed by the opposing team Georgia falls on the ball and Jones again goes back for a kick. This time tlhe kick is a feeble one and the oval goes far to the right of the goal posts With tfoe ball nearly in the center of the field. Howell makes the most brilliant play of tha game starting around right end and getting away from the Georgia team races down the field for a touch down. The player is cheered and Gregory kicks the goal. Score Carolina 44 Geor gia. 0 How the Teams Lined Tip Georgia .Positions North Carolna. duBignon left end Kluts Walden left tackle .ahull Mclver Thrasher left-guard Cromartie Shannon center Cunningham McCutchecn Lyndon right end .Gregory Ritchie right tackle Bennett Lindsay .right guard Phlfer Huff. Cox quarter Rodgers. Martin i Mclntosb Hicks left half .Austin Howell Jones Cox Young. half ilcRae Buxton Heidi Jones full back .Qravea Touch downs Gregory l. Graves 2 Aii- tin 1. UCRae 1. Howell 3 Buxton 1. kicked goals-Gregory 8 officials of the game- umpire Small referee Taylor of Tale timekeepers Klllorln and Harold time twenty-five minutes halves. F. I P. FQOTBALL MAM TELLS OF GAME Tichenor rormerly of Au burn and Later of Georgia 'Write of Georgia'a Defeat. Macon. Ga. November 12. Special Sued a crushing defeat as Georgia sustained at the hands of North Carolina today is almost unparalleled to football The Georgia team came down confident of then- abil ity to defeat any team to the south on account ot their victory over Tanderbilt two weeks ago That the team WEUI over-confident was shown from the very beginning of the game. They seemed to look upon tine game as won before they went on the field Had they played with the same dash and d t r. ruination that characterised tfcelr work In the Vanderbllt game the score would have been touch smaller.1 f Tbe Georgia team was completely rattled 40 Whitehall St JJEGENSTEIN Whitehall St. HEADQUARTERS FOR MILLINERY AND CLOAKS If you buy a Jacket Cape or Skirt before seeing the wonderful values offered at J.RegensteinV'you throw money to the birds. f DON'1\DO IT. -For not alone do we save you a lot of money on any garment you desire to buy but we give you choice of manyexdusive styles. For really Jjigh-class garments thefe 1s no place like this great second floor of ours. Ladies' Tailor-made Jacket Ladles' Fine Black Kersey Jack. et either single or doable breasted with tailor-made collar -'half silk lined. A nine-dollar Jacket for Monday C flfl only DiUU We have 10 Ladies' heavy Black Cheviot Jackets with wide lapels faced with heavy Black Satin an extremely stylish garment Jo close them out we shall offer the same Monday for 8,50 Choice of our twelve dollar and fifty cents line of Ladles' Black Kersey Jackets all llk lined made up in various fl flfl styles to dose out-at UiUU Long Angora Fur Sets for children collar and cape. For Monday 750 the set. FINE JACKETS We offer tomorrow a most wonderful collection of cheviot styles and materials ftany fine Kerseys Boudes'and Covert Cloth with and without velvet collar strapped and stitched- All these garments were marked much higher earlier in tbe season so don't fail to see them tomorrow. HISSES1 JACKETS. Choice of all our Hisses' Jackets value up to $9,00 made In Boucle Kersey and Venetian cloth colors brown oxblood tan and cadet for Monday C QD Only 0,30 COLLARETTE SALE. On Jlonday we shall offer a lot of our Collarettes In Coney Stone flarten Electric Seal Per sian Lamb and Krimmer odds and ends of our stock choice for 5.00 LADIES' CAPES Ladies' Crush Silk Plush Capes. a inches long ith 130 inches of sweep collar and front edge of cape trimmed with Thibet fun a very showy cape. Now being advertised by other houses at $6 our price An extra heavy pliuh Cape ao Inches long 150 inches sweep beaded And braided lined throughout With heavy Red Satin lining collar and front edge trimmed with light Stone Marten fur. Monday's price C fl fl O.UU A great bargain in Ladies' Mohair Skirts for Monday OQ choice of 100 at liuvJ 40 Whitehall St. J. RECENSTEIN 40 Whitehall St. by the fast play of North Carolina and at no time were they In the game. Carolina has the best team I have ever seen tn the south Her backs etart Quick and run extraordinarily bard. Her Interference Is doge and wae today as perfect as It is possible for Interference to be. At no time did Carolina lose tha ball on down Mhlle Georgia seemed utterly unable to gain the required five yards at any time. Captain Rodgers of Carolina as quarter wag the beat man I have ever seen In tbe position. He bandied the ball perfectly and ran his team with good judgment. Huff played the best game for Georsla. Hla tackling' was eure and caved ereral touchdowns Tbe rest of the Georgia team played miserably Carolina outplayed Georgia at every pclnt. The team is the beat abe has ever had The only question about the Auburn Car olina game Is how much will Carolina teat Auburn. Tbe Auburn football team which plays the University of North Carolina at Auburn tomorrow and the Georgia team in Atlanta on Thanksgiving day. Is the light est team that ha ever represented that college and In all probability the lightest team ever put out by any college of QO students The team averages a little Iczsr than 150 pounds. This is about thirteen pounds less than the average weight of the Georgia team and about twenty pounds less than that of North Carolina Yet wHh these odds against them. It can be aafely stated that Auburn will give a good ac count of herself in both games The team has been under the cver- vratchful eye of J W Helsman. a Vnlver slty of Pennsylvania man who haa coach ed every Auburn team since 1834. All Au burn la willing to swear by "Hels 'as he U familiarly called and if be cant put out a winning team in their opinion it can t Professor Taylor of Blrmlngham-Yale 86. ho was one of the umpires IBi the Georgia Vanderbllt game and who l more games than any other man In the south Btated that he considered Helsman S best coach that bad ever been to the south. Dr George Petrie. ot Auburn who U the father of football at Auburn say that Helsman Is the best coach toey have ver had. Such a statement as tms. coming from a man like Dr. Petrie who has been at Auburn since the beginning of foot ball carries weight. Among the c who have worked at Auburn are Ifcwlels. of 93 Trinity team Balllett. the famous Prlnceton7enteF- Harvey fallback on the Cornell team In 92. and Han guard on the Princeton team of 'S3 and 93 Helsman has been ably assisted In his work this fall by "Billy" Williams a half back on the Auburn team In 'M 96 and.98 and by Harry Smith fullback In 93 and nalfback to 94 and 95. The coaching department has been greatly augmented to the last week by the re turn of Walter Bhafer. captain of the 95 team which defeated Georgia at Buffalo .Bill's grounds during tbe exposition. Will Wills Quarter for Tulane In 3 and right- end for Auburn in 97. and Walter Holcombe quarter on last year's team are also on the grounds giving valuable assist ance to tbe team. With these five old men to aid him 'Hels man hopes to put his team to perfect condition for tne game with Georgia. Captain Mltcham Is the only old varsity player on the team. He Is a Georgia boy and halls from West Point. This Is his third year on the team. Ha nas always played cenetr and Is looked upon as the best man Auburn has ever had In th po sition. /He Is cool and has his team tinder perfect control. None ot the other men bad aver been in a game before last Saturday when they played the heavy Tech team. Though much outweighed. Auburn ran up a score of S to 4 with perfect ease. Tha Tedhs scored on a fluke In the first five minutes of play. Then Auburn settled down and ber goal was never in danger. The team plays a quick snappy fast gamo and It Is by thl means that they hop to overcome the weight of other teams. The outcome of the. .Auburn-Carolina game will be looked upon with inter est as Itwul lva anlnl$3it to the result ot the Georgia-Auburn game Thanksgiv SONS OF OLD ELI LOSE TO TIGERS Game Was BltUrlj CoatisUd aid Ihollj Omtisfietery te Bot. Sldu. YALE DID NOT SCORE A POINT Princeton Consumed an Hour and Ten Mjinutes in Getting a Touchdown. BOTH OF THE TEAUS FOUGHT STUBBORNLY Foe the Tigers' Bight End "Was the Only Player Who Distinguished Himself in the Game. Princeton. N J. November 12. The Princeton Tigers defeated the Sons of Old EU on Brokaw field this afternoon by the score of 6 to 0 While It was one of the most bitterly contested games ever witness ed on a football field it waa at the same time one -of tha most unsatisfactory not 'alone to the Yale team and their support- era but also to the wearers of the orange and blact md those who cheered them on to victory The solitary touch-down was made on a miserable fumble by right half-back. Benjamin when the ball was within fifteen yards of Princeton s goal. Tfce ball had been carried down the field by the Yale team by steady plunges into the Princeton line varied by an occasional end run until it lay between Princeton's twenty and twenty- five yard line. The teams lined up and Ita Baulles signaled for Benjamin to go through left tackle a position to Princeton s line which was awfully weak. The ball was pasted and Benjamin dived into the mass of human flesh. A second later tbe ball was seen to roll clear of the bunch of players and advance a few feet toward Princeton/a goal line. Quick as a flash little Poe the Tiger's right end bad gathered tip tie pigskin and was sprinting down the field with Chamberlln BUllman and Benjamin in hot pursuit The further he ran tha greater was his lead until to less time than It takes to write It ha had planted the ball squarely between the poets of the much-coveted goal of Yale. When Poe started on his nlnety-nve-yard run up the field the ecene wbicb followed beggars description. Old Cranks and oung Ones. The entire stands which surVound the field was one surging yelling mass ot fau- inanity to. an instant Old men and women threw dignity-aside for the tima being and joined with the younger but none the less erthuslastlo football cranks to their cheers for Foe and Princeton. It was several min utes before the game could proceed because of the Jubilant Tiger supporters crowding onto the field. Later to the game when ttie excitement again ran high spectators who had seats to the sraad stand left their places and surged on the side lines tbe management making' no effort to clear the fie4 so as to enable the working newspaper men to witness succeeding plays. Today's game was almost a repetition of the game at Cambridge on last Saturday between the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard In the latter game the wearers of the red and blue gained almost three times as much distance on-line bucking as did their opponents while. Harvard scored on a fumble The uama can ba said of today's contest Tale would carry the ball down the field toward the Tiger's goal only to lose It on an. exasperating fumble. Tha game wax not what could be called bril liant tentlftq ootbalU-At times both teams played a'masterly game but at oth er times many of Jh& flayers seemed to have forgotten the first .rudiments of the. t game and -come of their players would have put to shame th football game of preparatory school. Before Benjamin' disastrous fumble Ya e'a play bad been fierce After the touchdown the men grew more desperate. Jn every man there waa that boll dog de termination and grit that has won many a hard fought game for the wearers of the dark blue Time and again they would ruih the ball down the field toward the Tigers' goal only to los It on a fumble. On one occasion they carried the ball by plunges into the line seventy-five yard finally losing It on a fumble within twenty yards of the Princeton goaU Princeton on tbe Defensive. Priqceton was content to play on the de fensive until -within about fifteen minutes before the game waa called and it looked as thougo-tbey had been Instructed In this point by their coaches Their entire effort at line bucking during the first half and for twenty minutes of the second half netted them ail told about fifty yards while their opponents had carried the ball four times this distance There was- not however that variety of attack and good runs behind beautiful In terferences which is appreciated so much by the unadulterated football crank. Yale s playing in the mam was directed against Princeton a left tackle the one weak spot to the Tigers' line. The reports that had been sent out from New Haven to tbe effect that the Yale team was to a badly crippled condition had but little effect on the betting in today's game The orange and black had been up against Yale cripples" and their spending money had gone toward paying for the tuition of some Yale students Before the game-there were several bets made at eyen money but a majority of the money wasplaced at 4 to 6 to favor of Yale Of the Princeton team the bright -particu lar stars Were Palmer Poe Edwards Ayfrs and Hlllebrand while Durston Townshend Brown. Ely and Coy did the best work for i Tale" When the teams lined up the attendance was about 15,000 with adherents of Prince ton naturally in the majority. There was no lack f Yale men and women however and they lifted up their voices in encouragement of their faiorltcs whenever opportunity offered The Pr'nceton gnouters were bank ed in a eoltd mass to tha east stand op- poslte the Yale contingent and they kept up an untiring about for three hours varied ouly occasionally by a college song The teams Lned up as fotlows- Frinceton Position. Yale. Palmer left end. Kddy Greer t left taciiie. .StUlmau Crondis Mills left guard Brown Booth center. Cutlen Edwards right guard Marshall Hlllebrand right tackle -Chamberttn Poe. rtg.ht end. .Coy Duncan Hutcbtoson quarterback Do SauHes Ely Beardaley Ayres teft"halfback. Durston Corwln Kafer Black right halfback Benjamin Townshend Ayres Wheeler fullback McBrtda Touchdown. Poe Goal from touchdown. Ayres. Time 35-minute halves. VlBQUriA. DOES VAHPTTRrTTH EUven from the Old Dominion Van quishes the Tennessee Team. Louisville. Ky. November 12 Today was a red letter day for Louisville. Her most n fashionabia set were out in full force and elbowed each other for standing room at Fountain Ferry park where two great football teams repreaenting.two great unl- -versltles struggled for tha championship of the south .before 3.EOO enUmslastlo devotees Many tallyho parties with floating colors lined the east side of the fleid and it was difficult to tell which predominated the orange and blu for Virginia or the old gold and black for VanderbUt The gama was a first-class cn from every standpoint \and rbilt played a 1iard and snappy game but th odda were too great and pba went down in defeat She would have been beaten by a much larger score had ty not Continued on Twenty-PUBi ag ro' R" "I'A"t tt1 M' 't o tc ro' "O"c'W' 'c""N' 8' lfrO R' i 'f' J 1l l I w R dj c.IJ" J .v j. t A f nnN DRJI JNN r \t I f. f i f jti i ijUnabli'lo. HoldJ i SJ q p n Jd' t1 f' i. -.tl wi "uic@Jr v.lOill\eandAgai9Wilhoulsr ublel. f 'c. rt S.CORE t Jarh fHaJ lht B sf. T earn They Have HadfnYlifSl l \t"O ELl's'tDRr .t. the th on U.-- Vmi ulur .nce molt pme'todq cnu It."u Ce tu tba GeorII&.e18Ven. w. pla 8. 14 4 'WD. In JDOQ no' t N9rua tM t the e J bit la. aD re.ged "Va.nderbnt'.team a ume4 cO n.'t rI1IIIOt1tthat 'W 'YWtOr.-would aneuy G rg1a V dero11t mate a11se game today. wi 'nah. whIrl.that uDllerv ft 1d &D brea. Iln ll ec1 f nc wo 1l..1 ut 'W1.8 e Jo t h t work. btln 'l'hepexpected II oj with. baJ1'wu b e I 'A. 1. .h loeI led men. I I h lhan4at er cho e 081 Th tory. &T 11ron. oal m 'blsu-Ir' ft u. h V ty or an41V11tte J'eUed,1ftth 'to' brokeMl.e .rted t plaY onUnued 1ma1 croa 1Ia1 d o over' IhaJ min. utel nVl. r&l I a e. departm nts. val ues B "Liuli s' 4'value r'i .2- t ow 1 3 0 Jl'areOnlY .vesell 115. 1 cal-skiQ. \'i. 1J I. t. .red uced $2 15 'Wort. h and. I\ $2 50 iC i t F- i n's. S c rk commonsense. .1.i. \.L. U. r r.eg lar 5 redUC. ed. .1 $4 00' 215' l. .1 WRJTEFOROURNEW.ILLUSTRATEDCATALQGUE. 'if I"'Y' 'Q d r r. 't .I 't 1 .f :1 r jf t" CIJDrCJJ'.IJ'18Ils. NA rBIJAr I 't itJj 'of 'W"put 1 tll e e i iW f 1 JT.redeeU ftfc t fure ofthe Ge r&1 'ii th a tJm i&D4 th numer BP1eI 4I4.1 t rtei .me 1 Huff. 'Utt q u" er r'l lt'.bt f. t' i tJi ttothe 1'11ep a.s..u.- fflotth1rU' aDdRod&e t ht' V 1l4 tot"tm -and-Qrayq. b cbth llDefilr.ten'mor 'th b ufor J ftee l rfC'hted'AJ1d 1 neb u. 'ba.pJni. oorct 'Oat. ut't1I p'fro1Q ptb' .iJt".lh \V1U1)theball t on the Cfa. a ta.Jt thr1 \1&h i the. te. I'tora t QCh4oWDj. 'an4. recOIT.kScb. cosJ.i'8cori l1IJ&'J -J'o U 't. thSUtbaCatoJlD& teamne"Z'-Ie 'UP1fIut tJ1ef t 'the tbeGfiot' tha.tlt e .m l. b JJ 1DonJh. 10&1-)1110. J 11.4. 00' Pla ea Iti.OT r tor. the. touchdown.-and C01'l" b t e 1C.tnJd 'iOiJ.1i' QeoI'lfa.'halteu.UJtac ot 1u14w1th b lt"J i' 1e th CarO 'p ea".i.7. .tthe en fW' 1 M IIve.&r45 throuP'eentel' yar 1I rd. a d cRie'1. 'beld' d nn10n anenl1 run't .one.Tard. b n fntoUie tortwelvo7&rds and'the t. c roUna rreani 1atol"h1m ipu thro b&11l1l ow'onGeoi&1a' thr e-J'&r4 ve. thr uP'for aJltaIi e Orecortttor UmeJdcbg baJ1re.th&t1a.ve tor tlon fJ 'are haltCa.r tou wns be wh1cbla ea.u&'htb7 1 ne. balfbackol" "are tryaroUIld yar a. Rodgera.ecurea ru Grayes 'a J a. 0 II .0 I 'IIUKI I Y'RAE..n t orth .ot .the t ne 'the'runnerwasciown. 1reTer. hlm.caJo g Y d. Ro ell. h1I1nJury ofren lve b JIla. chineI 'been coll ge team. in- runs. c racy a1w YI r nd Nen t otball al wlShedeuccesa In' le anct.th&re.wu understan ng to'be not. elved arreem t entorcez ent oneot I new.l'Ulde compelled'l1im to.hand Be Ro 'era \tbe lrec n e Georgta'Ime ce ter the'reteree's ttod'e tlv yar tbema.tter.MeRae be- n4 n fsthrown tIIl e. by-a throu J'UdlIne. to. I 6h. uU.the I tI egorJ' k f It. I reathe 40wp tor"1lorU1 rgia we kens. I eoaland Car 11t1& .theball thee8t1tel'.of foraJr1ck andCi.r I:1ie. Yardabe ore belncthl'oWJ1 J1ro tojhelIne d ca.rrj B 7 S. .t&n tbu..tte.nptb aeo. .llie l1djarithbut.efrectaa.v t9 t\t1 e m n the'baUj.lome a1 ble 'c t I fa. a. o.n Ge tgla'B 1lv e Yard. lIJ11Uh a th torU1efltt oown. 4W ulf 5 orKb everald11ncult o1nt How 11 &rds. t fora. O. .ls OS& thebal1. plUI9through thebaIJ. ova outa e e le oe.a y Durlnr'the Ja.tter'Part thls'halt 1iel h u. lo nd' ThisUme tlhe'dck o -oe.s tar-to oal tthe'baU.nearly Jn t from. Ge rcl d wn thetleld gll O. C 'll.i. J N i e n. gf' f oft t 'm kif iii r tf 1' ht .n. .McRae..Buxton dOwns-Gregory 1 G ves. A tInt Mctt .e t 1 otthe r teree tlmekeeperaKUlorfn L. fQOTBALLMANTELLS'OF lda .T1 henqr f Georgiawntes ofOe rgia'.Defea n-specl81 c rct&-.Ulta1ned ar .tJi h&ndsQf N otUi Carol1 1a' unp r. 1eJedm Theo.oi. r te m canie of'thelr'abU- et at'any t .thelloUth .0f.thelr"'ctoryo"erYander m' two'yeeuago. 'l'batthe Wa40Ver-eonMentwaa Ih01n1. 'veri' of. t .am..T.heJ' le 4 k ok betore.they'w.mt tledt 'th y'pJ J.ed thth 'lI&m' 4eter. th&tCh&ractertsecJ. VanderbUt' PlX ath& core-w U14 'h ve f C" t.-- t'- - E' Gc N. - 'S.'T - E. .I - 'N. 'I ilb i W i &tliiHti W t ti IISt. 'f' 'W. --t d" 'F' i/D. BEA Q AR'fJ R'M INElX.AND "CLOAK$1Y' .Ifyotik1J 'J k fC p 'or oreJ ingjh wondenulV l 5cgff t o. atfJ.'Reg psteJQs- yo\r tnon.ey'.to7lje. lrd t QQ N 1 po JJ Ro.rfJ14Jt aI p dowesay y d moneY'.OIl' t1Y' garIJ1 entyoUdesireito' Duy.butWegi Y l c oi fJ apy' xc ives 'Ies ot jr U s th f&1iis .P9 'B c likeJ.hl'great.secondfloorofours. 2 l' L dl s"Talior-maaa.ackell. FlneBlo k Keriey.Tack In le 'or .br sted wlthtall adecollar r. balf' sllknri d 'A -i.i ket r""Mond'ay 6 0 0 l beavyBlack Ja kets beav rut 8 5 0 I Cbol e of4Jles' .Uk v rfous 9 0 0 out. -at I. forchUdreD 15 FINE J. W won- derfulcollectlon andmat r1als. .Many'fino' s y.oo Jes'ind 'with.and with ut 'Velvet.coUar. .AUtbese blgb rearller.ln tbeseason our. value'up KcrseyaJ1d colors.browo. 5 9 8 COLLARETTESALE. Mond nartenEIectric SeaIPc- 5 0 0 lADlES'CAPES. -c-- .8dles'Cnish SillcP"ullt p .s. J inchcslong )30Iridies f 'sweepcollar .andf.r ntedP.of lil1" blbetf r. .lt lnt by' .3' 98' 1aJ J5 'sw p beadedJlnd bra oed tbrouZboutwltb heavYR .lInl g"'cOl arand 'U h St nc 5. 0 0 Ladles""Mohalr' I 39 SUMPTUOUS MilliNERY. BEAUTIFUL-SYMMETRY It's rarely that you QO see In one department .u h a 4isplay of gO cous Millinery as we sbowyou tomorrow. In figures' lth high S lIh I I. bf wearingthe. proper A Special. pedal Fashionable corset. Th..e. In Velvet Ribbon' Neckwear "Nemo Hats Sale 'We are equipped 1Iih a yery Self-Reduc1i1g" pretty for IS dozen Ladles fine Velyet Onr 50 stl1es of now F l "ble Neckwear inc1udinr' rtli figure. benn.e'it Hats either solid brlmt or Fan. Ribbol1l A. and 4" Ruches Stock CoUan Tuc\ed m deto dotwo'th.\D -J T.I particuhrll weU. S d th b. h 'd -:1- 4. PoUlts Scarfs-and Ties U1 fact atin .atmg UD or 0 runs .c et WI new PULNa an rwt" d. u FUSTTohyglcmcally .Ye'/ nc eSU&Ule lor even. Plain crowns or Tam O'Shan. checks PWn and moire tAf. d"- t reduce the abdomen. ndfle grace and11m- ing all .ce weu. metry. ter croW11l some with Ihirred retu luiiable. fur crush bells B It. Buckles S T' .t 'tr th' :1 e ECONI- 0 suppor eng en.aDu-IQ cu s YClTet e In the latest styles or neck bows worth 25C of phYlual weaknen to help and.-IIJIproTe the Handsome Belt Blicklel in air figure. worth rom .75 to 2.50 30c and 35c a yard he no taking Parb &n effecti I 'r. And this corut ioes JUlt what It wasJWia MONDAY. I.ONDAY. a -anstyarletyselectedto-sult to do. Hundredaofwomen hereabouts are Ibe fancy of all hearts at popu. fillding it out enry day. L 18. 180. tar prices. Made of Frellch CoutU. al15iz y 52.50 Whit aItSt. 7 Whlte Oans fast t- 1 tn cIo e andwH in tiJ :1e th &I'dl I.have C rolln ques on Auburn-Cu'- .tt.at o 400 1 O t an oddS' I ubum bense te ll1 1. PennsYl anla haa-coa.ch- 'lte 8 can't be done. 1\1I10 has umpIred the Aubl1rl1laYB we1 t. coaches wor ed Princeton centel't 9 Hel m1U1 u sted by''Bll1y' halbeen re. 'Walter8hafer. ca1 ta1D th JUl' n. ula e 9& arrounclaglvln& valua.ble.8llst- ftv e tl n oftri tr L Jia1lStrom WeatPolnt."n1Ia U.buflwaJ" etr fa'lookeduponat tile' Ie raznebeforo the Teebtea.m Tho .Au urn .fCO I with"J)81'tectease..The 'l'edh.llICored. oua. .ft11ke mthe erStftve 'l'benAuburUnttled l.er goal'F pever.indanpr. t.ea PMOan4 Jt"I. r uu.neanaJha t1j.e o enQ 1e e'elCht. otothet out 'ot th Au\urn 1..Una ramewUJ st t..m.8tV"&D. t 'th' 'AubU D"nme' d o y Ot.DS C I .f. 'i i. 1 kt- 't'j 0. J :1" 1\ 'SONS I Gamll BUterJJCOItISted Uls tlsfaetolJ BotkSld. Prl ceton Consued a Hou Jute i Wg oucw. O mI SBBORNLY Rght. Ed Oy Plyr W Disghed H1 1 i Ge. Prceton N.J. Noembr 1-The Pton 'EI' Bnl Od E0n te tltern ie sre .O.Wlle i w btery wites. e footbll 11ed w sme tme .t 'tha- unat1t&tO. 'aone t te 'uPPrt butiO weaers Of. the'ora..n. ge. ad bl chered on vc .101try toch-ow me mlbl rlpt.ha.lt-bk m wh t b wa 'thin ftten 'ads P ton'ICaL hd cr- I Se th te .tay pl u io Petn. line red by. oaona r unU I btwe PIncton' fve J'an 1n te line D &ules IIed enjl to h ta1 a psIton. 'Pineton's no whwas awtu 'e bl W p Bntn'dive t fiesh &eon .hitr t bl' Ben rol p& rl ad adva Pcto 1 &oa1e. Q k hUtUe poe .T er8rht e 2 nered te ppkin ad IPrt dow fte with. Chbrli 8tman a Ben. Ja p uit. frer &et u hl le unU. le te -t tes wte't. i. h pltec bll y ttwen pt. mu-vete Y e. Wn P .t h n\e.fve r. r 1ld theecenewo tolowed bn Ce.cptn C ad o Oe. T8 stada Wich sn le.u one eurl. el mi i ntJ iIant me 'omn th .4gty'Uf Uobl jined 'yoIer b nbn thel.i' entluUo footbl tn'.thelrdera Po Pto 'It w lIever J. ute bef ca eUdprebecaule oe t b1t. 'ger.uppr .crowdg tld Lter 1 te gam.'Whel te .c t.e. e. .n. tn'.r.nb..J. .I.i. 0.1 h fts1 t cad .t Jettr pJe nd suge ele' Une 1&'ement 8 eor .tC cer fe .1 enk th wog nespar len Wteu snce play. Toa. gae w eOt rpttlon a p4tCbr91 llt.S&d y 1el UnvelU Pnnyantad Hd.In t Jtter cme teween te .8. ind b1e Pe aot te tie 'aa .mt dtce onUne' bul 4 tei op nDuwhqHud'Bc ouapbt. TeBJc o'.acot da11 nte Yao'woudcrJ. tb bl dQWIt ldtward th e8CO. om J..elt" n a XpatIn 'tble. T. nt t el" b. ee4.lrl. JIt' n 'bth' Ple &JtrYb a. Oh .ef.te ottt,1lyer e' f Vifo ttej G d O-c. /j i" i cae 'nd thr. Pla'ewoid ae t aam thtfotbn me pepatory oo Bort d1trou. .tu \le 'ae' ben del.Af i to touhdown Irew mor ever tre"wa uIJdogde' trnUn al ta ha Wo JJY' E hrd tought for'the wereBQr'the drk Tme aalnthYI'ou11 rU te b ld.wn teldtwudthe Tiger' ioal. 10 .ton tumblt. n oculon fhey.caed th1 pluges .Une. se ent.fve yar41. tnl atumblewh1n Pl.nceton goal 'P etn. c Deteiive Prl ceton tpaYonJhe de- unt -lh'n abut ttenmlnute g w 'au lobd Ithougbtbey bd 'ben fnstrct Jnthl. thir coce. T el entre efrt at i1buclg durng' onst Jlf'and mlputes reccndbalt tld &bt ffy yada.whle cppnenl ha carrd theb1l tour ties dlltce. Ther bow evr latvarlety atack rnl bhInd bauUfl1. terterencewhlchll' appreclt.J 'mldt unadu1trat iootb-erank"Yale'a plfln& mai dIrete gin.t' f f I k1.eon eak .pt rlPrt ben'snt'out'trom' efet Yae te' .u bJy crlppe. cndlUD. habt" lte eet the'btUnkfntoaS h u' aganst tlelspndtgmoney ha towlrd Iftlf'lthe tuitn. .tud nts. Be r gathere sveral bts ut a miJorty "tthe nney W.lce'a .t- faor r Pnceton tea U e brlght'iarcuc strs F EdwardJera HUlbrand. Durlton. Townshe4 Ey Cy 1lt.wurk Yal nn d up t 'atendanco Wls. abut 150 ahrentaot Irln naturly majty. Therewl n .a.ck awtvomen.hoever.&d "t the lte thei volc noura.sem t tav.rt henever.tppporunt alere. Te Pnet n alouterljw reb ldml Inth "Utstnd-p- plt. contIncentandteykepf untrng fortree bour'Tarle ollon-ly by a 'coleg son e.a 'Jeup foows FJnceton. Po ltn. Plmer. .lf 'end. Kdi. .le taJe .Stlau Cro 'dfa (11l .Jef gurd. th nter. Edward. .1arshl' H1ebrld. .rght tacdef.-ot Pe. -.Cy Dunan Huchn.quek..i D a\elEJ' Be rlf Ay Jf "lfk .Drton Conn Kfer rht hak .Benan owen 'AyeB WMler .fullack cBre Toc w .F. G troI' touehdow' Ayres Te3minutehlves vm DO 'V E.e fm te Ol D V quhea theTe LuveJJ.N vembr u.-Tly'j r ltter dy oLI -fH.er t :1 rb 'nt. wer o WUore elbowe' ec th r stn. r. Fo\ntain .Fr .P.wbre. .two aC totb .r.P nUi.two g t1I c ver.l.l .t&K1e. forthe' hplo It tQ Ith etoreJ,1 eut\o deo teel.1y tJ'h p.s .l fo coln lJe t et J fi ad W' ult telF1hclpre t the'orA e dIIUforV1 th.ol' l ctor. 'Valt LI Te.gam wu"I tt-U frQ eyer tdpOC. Vandrbft pl.ed' 'a1 d-enj sae bt th. were.o t 4 p' 4wilf 4te' Sbe.Jv \dd. av9 -ea I\ utb 'I hD A t" ui r i j l 2 L' s. .d 4 1. TH CONSTITUTION. ATLAITA G SUNDAY. 3SOVPJMBEE 13 189 iciCEQRCIAS TEAM GOES. DOWN BEFORE 1h coria Doy Were TheirStron Opponeols Dd 'CaroIlo3 Scired Ti aod Again Without Tiovb1 I llst1earn I ffOYIELL'S t 2 -.1 v te c&rt. 1L-SpeCaL- 't .1 U I n weu1n s tl o 1t th a b guooeuh.buck a.u th ia tou h- own rec- o .7 va th M tt na1 rio- ba 1 aa d 1i aYe rnlng u tiaZ1i oth- I ot gOO4 'ialt r. Quickw9rk. Tfie'quick Ge p o t I 1t'wa aU.to n z i ma ver fine's. n ldg 9 C XOIIn& ma t th wa th cir- tho b1 ay 'I S S S S S I C S S I a T i CATCHESTHEWORM. -1 eachof Ihiil someexceptional .t .1 3fl OI.dU l themat----------- 3 a lI 1 I-i t I sprlngUeel 11 Of Z aL I sizes.- u I i l f A 35 P asases pae ec reuuce I Uk 41- j Li& $2.SOtoonly L.Id bU S y I 3 n's 'i. senses. 4g fl 'D'F.UU OL.W or J s 1 1 S 1. 'H j' -j /f i. 'I r be Ilebadnot. alf iilooked ht nd Inilaes Idthe Iqndowas tbe last .tatf tackIedweli sndheIdup 1s mdlii very .TbaeniyredeemMg bac .h I his man. th tlm in. 'l 4' elb 4 7 1.1 I -1 b 'I ck Th&baII call endzfor for ten -a of 'flte5 th Io -the WIthib. amiGregory the o the frsthair p bays started andtbe 3 all oyer them. AustIm'wltbtball by sxo Ioter for reory kIek1n the goal. of o jietrlrjn the the es.ou.w be a otpretty -a. .i-I.- IA -T' I i' 'I c2 Endof him-along or th o man ba Ma alIt t socatj .a rules-of to fo Or withthe a kicksan fleIffor a-kick Is theman aitick the fltttauciuiown. oa40. 1t whenthe tuur atgoaltrorn ovaigoe.s field 4 r. ow-the .P altlont. duBignon..left tackie..Ghull Tlu'aher..left-guard dhanuon..center atcCutchacnLyndon.rlght flitchie..right Lindsay..right guard..Phifer Cur.- .quarteu'.B.odgers. Iilckz.Ieft balf..Anstln Young..rlgba MAN-TELLSOF B.yoi -Formerl Ge rgfa'a L2.-Spe lih- s alleled caZnedOwncoiufident ts j-Dr iItTElU I- F RLULIIO I LIIlj WhIt haIISt. buy'a' Ja ket offer atJ. Regenstein s "you DON'T .n t. is I3Jg Pet 5.breastedwithtallor.rnid -Ja -r- Ui Ladl s' 0 Us Js FurSets FlNEJACKETS.- i audmatCrlaIs ucIeSafl&COYett- strap nd highcr-earlier failto allo-flIsSeS' J y di 22 1on .01- ThIbetfti 1- oth 'j di -i -light-Stone bargalninL Ii such gorg- show you with stom ache can only be obtained Special wearing the The C We HneofWomenpa.shioe. the.prpr corset Fall portli because it Fancy 4 made to do two things Satin under the brims Inches wide and- Scsrf sndTlts FIRST-TO hygienically .veryihhug desirable for and giie andatreet suitable Belt Sacrcco-To ttrengthen audio cute edge zc from $1 $2.50 new FarIIIsn oee whkt it was Ld. I' -1 vast yariety aelected tx suit Hundreds of women larprices. all siztI--o1y REQ EN STEIN NorthCarolins. Crollnh ght- has eragewelght sat ely ac- winn petrle'ot 92 mt 96 97 th player-on Auburnran to4. ltj thierneane hops- vsmOme.the teams.-hOUtCpme upon-with ess1tWt1- Yeaflln3Iglttothtralolt .ofth..Georgia-AUburn -iE. -4- itEoLDf.TIcuENGni u NOTSCOREA BOThOF 1 3. it-The .0. the-orange. bIacand rfght.half'ba-ck. than-It wrlte'lt 'otug 1i thzew41etY-a51 -belngand lntheir noeffort flel n -tlmesas on-line-bucking a ouafqmbie. beseid Celdtward.thp to-Jose ltort snxupetingfumbte. Klu -bril. 3lata flm onspis1ede mastetlygamne- .trthnee- manrofthmp1ayera-e med haveorgottcutho-flk1trudimentg9Z the the' game'ofe' Yale's hem therewee auy ot-the t flnallyloalng Prln eton t play-on Thelr-enttrs-efforr Iii. IootbaderankT le. sentou abadly crIppled-condItIon thebetting blackhtdbeen th money-but brIght-partIcu. DurstonTownahend Geydid teatwork of howaverand oii. teamsilned Palmer..left end---------------- ts.eaue----------StUlmaui guard..Browu .De halfbe.tk------------ .tuilback--------- DOESANDzILT TennessisTeam. it-Today LouIsvIlle/Her were ti tootba1ltanw aouth.beforo colorallued o- the-orange nd Vanderbilt ti w I L' -t. „ , - - * _ ; - * - ' . . > ; . < * * * | . ( " ' ' ' , - ; * ( , , , ( . ) ¬ * . , < , ¬ , ¬ , . ¬ , , - , & , . ¬ . , ' ¬ , * . . ' , , ¬ . , & - , . ¬ . , * - . - . . * , ¬ . - , , , , . . , , , . , , ; ¬ . * > . - . _ . . . . - . . , , ( , , ¬ , , ; , . . , , , ( , ¬ - , ( , . ¬ ¬ . : ' , , , $ , . ' , , - , $ . ' - , , $ , - . . " ' ¬ , $ . $ , , , ' - , - , $ $ . , $ , ' , , $ , ' . * > , * * | . * , & . * ( , , " ¬ ' - ' - ' _ . % . * . . . . , - . * , , ¬ , . , - . * . ' ; , „ * - . - * , : * - * . " , - . - - ? . , , ' . . . * * * ' % | " " ? $ & , | > , - ' ' - . ! : < . . , , . " : . ' - < . . ' . . , , . , , , . - , - . . . . . * - - - - . , . , , - , ¬ . . . ¬ , > ¬ , , , , , . { ¬ . . . , , & , . , , . ¬ . ¬ , . , . . ¬ ' . - . . . , ¬ , ' - , * , . , ; , ' - . , , , . , , , . * " . . ¬ . . ( , , * . - , ' . . . . ' ¬ , . ( , . , ' , . . , ( . . . , ¬ , , , , ¬ , , . , , . - - , - . . , . , . ; ¬ ¬ - - , . , , ¬ . . , , . . , , , ¬ . , . . . . . , . . . . . . . . , - . . . . ; , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . , , - . . , | , . . . , . . . . . , - . . , . - , - , , , , , , - . . * . , ¬ , ' * ' . . . , . { } ¬ - ¬ - . , . . * _ * ( ' ' * * . , . > : , . , ' . " ' \ . - , . * - . " * , ' - ! . ' . , * , - , - ' . - ' ¬ , , ¬ , ' , , ; - , . . , , - ¬ , ¬ , ' , , - , ' . . ' , $ , , - , , , , , ; , . , , , ¬ , . ' , ' . ? , . $ ; , , ; , * . ' . , . „ . . . . ' ; ( . . , . . : ¬ . . , . , , . , . . ' > . ¬ . , ¬ . ¬ , , * . , , . ¬ - . ¬ . ¬ " , ' ' , - . * ( > " { ? * ? . . , , * - . . ¬ . , ¬ , . # > * * * * . ' . - , ' . , ' ' " " , ¬ ' , ' . ' , , ' ' ' . ¬ ¬ . 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' , - . % _ ' . , . - , : " ' . . , , , _ . . ; - , - , & - - . . , - - } ' . , ; - . ' ' , ' . - ( . ' - . . . , . ' . . ' - . . . > ; - . - . - - ' . . - - ' - ' . ' . - . - ' . & - - . - . . . . . . , ' . . . . - , . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . - . ' . . . . . . . . . . . - . . - - - - . - . . - ' . . - - . - ] : : - ; - _ _ _ ! - : . ' . . . ' . ' . - . ' ' . . " ' - ; ' . - . . - ' , ' . - ' . ! - - - - ! : - - - - - . . , ! ' ! " - ' - . . . * - - - - . & - , - - ' - - - - - . . . . , ' - - - . ! - . ; - ' - - - - - - ' : - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - . - - - - - - * _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ : " - - - ( . - . , ' , - " , . & . . , - : - . . - - - _ _ _ . - - - $ - . . - - . . - . - - . - - - , - . - . . - - - . - - . ' " ' . $ , - - . - - ' . . ' , - ' - - - . . . . . , - , ' - - - - - . , - - ? * . - ' - : & - . . . . - ! . - - ; . ' - - ' , . ' : - ' - ' - - - - - - . ' * * - - - - - - - & . . . . * ' - - . , - . : - : , - : , ' ' - - , - ' . . - - , - - . . . - - - - , ' - - - - ; ' - - & . ) . . . ' . . . - - - . . . - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - . . - . . . . . . . , . . . . ' . . . - - , - . - - - - - - . . - _ : ! - - , / , $ - - . - - - - , - ' " . ' - . - . , , . ' ' - ; .

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