The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia on October 22, 1916 · Page 2
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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 2

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Atlanta, Georgia
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Sunday, October 22, 1916
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Page 2
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Footprints of Baby Will Establish His Identity for Life I I rN IMMENSE amount of unhappiness end lnjus tice has been caused la this world by the fail- ar to establish a person's identity especial ly to prove beyond question that he was a cer. lain mothers child and could not possibly be any other. AU this trouble In the future can b Avoided by th new system of taxing baby's footprints. Am long ago to Kin Solomon's time the difficulty that might arise about a child's disputed parentage was tecog nized. Most penooa remember the story about Solomon's judgment as related la the tint book of Kings chapter 8 and It they do not not hers It Is There were two mothers In Jerusalem wtoo cam running to the king tad told him an extraordinary story. The first slid that they both lived In the same house that she became a mother there. and that tint other woman had a baby three days later. There was no other per- ton In the bouse at the time. 4 4- The nret complainant alleged that the other woman suffocated her own baby In the night and while the complainant was asleep stole her Urine child and put the dead. one la the place. When the mother wakened she discovered that she was holding a dud. baby. The second woman denied the story and declared that the other woman had lost her own child and that she was trying to steal a Un one. All the WM men around g ng Solomon thought that this was an Insoluble prob tern but King Solomon abruptly said to one of his soldiers Bring m a sword dtvtde the flying child in two and girt halt to the one and half to the other. unfortunate baby as tf ny pictures show was held up by one c while the ruthless soldiers prepared to chop It exactly In two. 4- A shriek Immediately followed. anti the woman who had made the complaint said Oh my lord give her the living child and la no wise slay It. But the other said Let It be neither mine nor thine but divide It" King Solomon decided that the woman who WI. reedy to Ii"e up her child rather than tee It killed was really the mother and ordered that It should be given to her. For over 2601 years this has been considered one of the best cases of good judgment. Now science tells us that the same problem can be with more certainty by a simpler and less dramatic method. In some of the maternity bat, both in this country and abroad the nuree takes the new-born baby's toot In her hand and Boers It gently with printers Ink by means of a roller. 4- 4 Then she transfers an Impression of Ute iota of the toot to sheet of paper. Stoe repeats the process with the other foot finally she deans oft the Ink with alcohol The baby may squeal a little but the proceeding does not do him the slightest harm. The baby's name Is also written on a piece of adhesive plaster and pasted on Its back. Other precautions are taken to preserve the baby's identity. A piece of tape Is tied around Its wrist bearing a number end a similar number is tied to the mother. This all prevents the recurrence of some sad cues where nurses took the babies away for some purpose and returned them to the wrong mothers. Every child Is born wltha complicated system of lines on the soles of his fe t and the surface of his hands. and these lines You Can Shake This Tower But Its Safe. in Earthquake g k BY THE mere pressure of your hand you can rock Esther Campanile. the 802- toot memorial tower Just completed on the playing yields of the University of Cali tornia. In order to minimize the danger from earthquake shocks the architect. Professor John Galeo Howard and the engineer. Pro. fessor Charles Iterlith r so Built the strong frame of the Campanile that cross- bracing is eliminated at alternate stories. As a result the vibration of the tower Is like that of a steel rod one end of which is throat In the ground. In an earthquake the tower would vibrate like a tree. According to Professor E. Halls tests the tower hat a vibration period of 113 seconds. By pressing against the steel frame at the top of the Campanile every 113 seconds be was able to rock the tower so that the earthquake recorders registered the vibrations. However th amount of motion was less than the thickness of a sheet of paper. The plan of the building is to prevent cumulative swaying such as would occur It the period of th earthquake and the vi. brations of the tow r were the same and such as would sues the structure U collapse Pressure of a Girls Hand Will Rock This Foot Structure Just Completed at the University of California. INFANT WIGGLES TOO MUCH. FOR FINGERPRINTS s How footprint. of child are made in hospital to prevent babies bem rauwd by careless nurses. S 1 m never change. Though forgers and feet grow la size the lines grow with them and the pattern remains true to Us form. This One-Eyed Machine to Do Your Typewriting A MECHANICAL stenographer and a one-eyed machine at that I This strange invention hi. been per fected by John B. Flowers or Brooklyn and i described in the Popular Science Monthly. On top of this new machine is a huge round mechanical eye equipped with a lens and a retina just like the human eye. Hold a trpewrltten sheet of paper up in frost of that eye. and It sees It even as all of TVS would. and the typewriter keys start wotfcng The eye cannot turn In socket like ours so it rides to and fro on the typewriter carriage Instead the literal motion of the carriage causing the eye to progress tram one word to the nut or the line of print which It Is copying. When at the endof the lint the Inner workings or the machine shift the taper head one Un. and move the carriage back to the other end of its trick to tart anew. 4-4- The eye depends fox its properties upon a number of selenium cells. These are so arranged that each one tan be affected only by one letter rat of the alphabet. The inventor of this remarkable eontriv anee has succeeded in getting it to work satisfactorily on simpler litter The ordinary business man has prob- ably never thought that the time would come when he would hi" a teaeiyed stenographer in his office and A mechanical oot at that but apparently that time Is not tar off it the lmtioa garb out u tree at It promises. method of identification was developed from the system of keeping huger print records which was suggested by the late M. the nerve In the legs of the animals and weighed the muscles from day to day. After Ii month and a week it was found that the muscles lost half their weight. Strange to say the muscle fibers in the wasted member are irritable and sensitive and not almost dead as has been suspected. This again disposes' or the medical notion that the structure of man depends for Its vitality upon nerves spinal cord and brain. The brain fetich has been disposed or in previous annOuZlee122eDtI. Drs. Kato and Langley now put a pause upon the nerve nonsense. 4- These Investigators also discovered many things about the treatment of infantile paralysis writers cramp hemlphlegia or paralysis of one side. They brought to light the fact that Swedish movements massage electricity and other manipulations are logical and proper In the treat. meat of wasted muscles. They found that muscles thus cared for immediately after Injuries lose decidedly less weight than tho not treated. Electricity Is superior to all the other methods combined. Muscles given electric applications lose only 12 per cent In volume as against great loss without such methods. It 1 therefore meet and proper that electricity should be begun tar paralysis and wasted tissues as early as possible. The doctors who have already advocated this plan are now Ported by scientific experiments. Odd- Facts of Science Found in Many Lands AFRKNCH scientist successfully com. bated locusts in Argentina by laoon latng a number of the insects with a part- slue disease and liberating them to Infect others of their kind. 4- 4- BECAUSE it is difficult for a man aim- let a searchlight to see the object at which it Is pointed a trench naval officer hub Invented an electrical aiming dance to be operated from a distance. 4 4- 4 VE9TIQATION by Department of Agrt- 1. culture experts has shown that both tiled and volatile oils and cattle teed can be obtained from the cherry pits thrown away by canneries of the United State. 4- 4- rpO FURTHER color photography a New 1 York man has Invented a camera in which two plates are exposed at once a perforated xnlrrot that permits light to teach one plate reflecting it also to the other. 4- npO TAKE the place of whips la driving JL tattle a Texan his Invented ID Implement that administers an electric shock from dry batteries and a spark coil contained in its handle. OVER a series of mountain peaks In Prance there will be stretched antennae approximately fifteen milts long to test wireless waver of extreme length. 4- 4- A PATENT her been granted a New York Inventor for a guard to prevent the lagers of a person wing a sewing machine being pushed under the needle TO SAVE the life of a loeomtiItte are- man should n engine and tender be separated while he is at work two Penn- rtUlon of Paris and le now used by every Important detective force In the jlrtllud world. Electricity Aids in Infantile Paralysis' By DR. LEONARD K. HIRSHBERG Joktu Hopkins Onv rii y. WHY does a dentist kill a nerve before he fills a deeply decayed tooth' Why do the leg arm and side of the face shrink atrophy waste and become very tutu after bleeding occurs in the opposite half or the brain medulla oblongata or spinal cord TFlnally. in line with these Interrogations why la there a loss of thick. ness volume size and fatness of a leg the large nerve of which has been cut serf- ocsly Injured or Infected with the microbes of Infantile paralysis Many Investigators seek now and hue long sought a thorough-join explanation of these questions the answer to any one of which U the answer to all. The latest UI&1 upon this Held of the cloth of mystery his been made by DB 1. N. Langley , ad T. Kato In the Journal of Physiology It technical periodical devoted to the ex- irlm ntal science or living tissue. 4- If the nerve which leaves the spinal ford to attach its splflertlke ends in a distinct muscle called a motor nervt is Dynamite Is Used for Tree Planting DYNAMITE for planting trees hat been used iBcrasfully on some Enillah farm. The attempt was made on III apple orchard of 4000 trees to be planted. A. soil auger with a two and a half horse power petrol engine was mounted on the running par of a light firm wagon. With this outfit two men were able to put down as many holes in a day as thirty men could have punched with a bar and a sledge hammer. In these holes light charges of dynamite Wfre exploded. In the enanUona the tire orchard WI. planted In less than ftt. teen days of nine hours each. Typewrite/ operated by mechanical eye. The round ball OS trip U the yes It is looking at the word say on the sheet of paper at the left. As the eye rides long on the typewriter carriage the separate letters of Bay fall on the eye' retina in succssioet Selenium calk iii this retina mpond to the r" and the word say" iacopied crushed. cut or otherwise wholly damaged the particular muscle concerned will ex. hiblt what you can a palsy or a "paralysis. Then after a time. If the nerve does not heal or reassert Its Ute quickly the muscle will become very small and slender. 4- 4- 4- Frogs rats and other animals may be used as well as humans for these observations so Drs. Kato and Langley used such table poultry" for their work. They cut Find New Oil in the Philippines BT MERE accident a new oil nut has been discovered in the Philippine Islands. A. Catanfiaaces shipper sent twenty-fire bags or what he bettered to be lumbfnC oats to Manila. It soon trans. ptred that they were something els After A thdfOtith study or the nut a botanist claw sifted It as f the family to which santol belongs. The oil is found to be satisfactory In the manufacture of soaps. Man names tot' the nut are liven by the natives of the Philippines such as balucanag batuakan kalimotJtn mfllmhola catu and dudoa. It hat been found by Investigators that the oil from this nut has been generally used for illuminating purposes for at least thirty years. sylvantans have Invented a sort of hammock to be suspended behind the engine. A DISTINGUISHED British sclenttst has decided that there Is some form or radiation from chalk and granite cllfrV possibly electrical. which causes dlf trences In places near together. Napoleon Made a i Guns With Horses MACHINISTS who made war taunt. tine In the time of Napoleon I. tad no such equipment and tools as thou of the present day process. According. to an time sketch brought to light recently cannon were bored by means of a wooden lathe driven bj horse power. The horse traveled in a circle in the tower part of a building turning a prodl. gious axle. to the upper end of Which a erode but huge gear wheel was attached. The boring toot was advanced by a man operating a hand wheel at the fir end of a machine. Another hand wheel-on a smalTtraTel- ing car about the lathe lowered the Can. OD into. place orremoved It wheti ma. chined. t 1 5 Catches Cold in His Wooden Legs. HE only profane authorities that an 1 honest mortal medical man should recognize are facts and truth that are verifiable to more than one way. The sus pt1btlltr of human kind to accept a dictatorial statement as correct is Ttry great. Tell a medical student that one of the causes of a cold Is a contagious microbe and he will almost surely fix. it In nil thoughts JIB the only cause. Dr. Oster often told his students and patients to keep their feet dry and thus be free from colds Upon one of these occasions a beggar at a clink in the hospital out "You're wrong doctor. I have colds every season and have two wooden legs. WITH a view to Improving the quality of Philippine tobacco the Insular got. ernment has put into force I. law requiring the inspection of all that Is exported. WITH a new motor truck body one man can dump a load of two tons In. thirty seconds. Dip Your Toothbrush in. Salt to Destroy Germs rT HAS been found by experiments that a 1 toothbrush becomes infected after a sin. fie using. Each brittle serves is inoculating needle and any part or the rums which may be pea t rated by a brittle is vaccinated with whatever germs happen to t ourlah1Dc on th brush. The tooth powders and put" commonly used contain nothing powerful enough to destroy the microbes in a toothbrush. Even a twenty solution of carbolic add will not till them. A simple method suggested by Dr. Hugh W. MaCMUlu for keeping the toothbrush tree from dirt end the germs of disease U so simple that it is surprising nobody ever thought of It before. It consists merely in applying to the brush each time you are through using it enough ordinary table salt to cover every bit of the bristles with thick coating. rim rinse the brash thoroughly in running water sprinkle it liberally with salt and hang in a dry place where it will not be exposed to dust and dirt. The salt la dissolved on the wet brush and. penetrates How a toothbrush look when in cued in a coating of salt. thoroughly to the center of each tuft of bristles. By the tlmeX the brush U needed pin the water win h ye evaporated and each bristle' will be covered with a deposit of crystal One cannot imagine germs living in such an environment y Dr. rIacMl1 Ian. Bacteriologists may take exception to this for it Is doubtful' if salrjs fatal to all germs. Sat It Is fatal to' many and there Is probably no microbe whos growth will not be hindered seriously by the thick coating of salt. eo ? ATLANTACONSTJUTION nAG SECTION i r N an ca1 ed are e ab11ab l Identity QU I e iDthe be bythe CO K ; p& Dtp D1ze Th re ca fCSUI11nI to extro hOuaJ t n I e. diseo ered d ned d m lane pro em me tf. The bib many ancient ec. bile it. n red ne o acle decided. with by. m od. h lin ab d th n bom h r In b e le pi t adbe e pr e ta d 1 t Call- mlnlml Profes r t 8eCOD s. PrMa 1l thelt ! p bwu B the thi Dea r the 11. tower I 0 chi1dare ba es bang mi d e. J.- I I r 121 T t ye 1 is dele1l t' mfbanl al na e th carrl& to. end of tb Pl epen a 11L Tb. ar a y b 1Dven Rtete ld or lna1 L u Item Bt1 88te t an wt ighed k a al 812 mf lcal c2epe 1d l oad y a M. Th se pro r mU8Cl those It is tl88' es I A FRENCH 1I enttAt lu tunr laUD th in eetl B ECA USE 1 1m t obj INVESTIGATION A i. lture G f n TorURTHER pla r. To e1 c d17batterles Pran PA. T b 1na P Jh u vm th11 whllitbe to HOP M UriI7. Wb l I me l rd lnra it2lt lOll thorongb 1D1 an wer t eld ofma I lo1 i1 te hn1cal e ot d lo rlmtDtal leaY s Ire mn cle-caUec2 nerve-is D YN MITE Cr I11tC Iult 000 p1aJJ C1 att r w. oil we a7 ba e ied thaJIUor nt10l1l & t leu aI IatJae tJ 6writer ofu a aucc aioa. Sel InipIth. wordaJ u. oel mu le ien n. n e PhiUpp nes B. 1" beendllcovered Catan ulnes Itoon else. h asf b lon Many ntttl es such-as \3.ntan rt fu nded th On ne. sct ntis rm cUmati d1t ma e I p sent I nnon b tra Teled end IIm 1r aTe1. l to p ce or' r'@tn v@d itbeb ma. THE me 1cal a 1t very T tl l an atu ents dr 8 t cl nie caned out W lrn tob cco go. o man onds. T Des oy IT I Hn iJ rl an AD rt ma Pfl1ft tId with. be the nt1n et10 P tooth ruab. rbott 1aea nobo 7 merel1ln appl eYer ottbe brbtle1rlth a 100u. in. tattot tlm eva reted will I ceima r. Bacter1ol ex pU D 1 salt 1S JDJinTand whoSe b1n e y tb t j. sx 4 1 di S d' i. r r Y r. y I a t IIr cj Y a F Li c. t the l to a Bing F. a F p reow I S. cane ls a- 1 Y' I J t :1 eg 4 IL" a S ae feet I I Y r i i ytbration r' L i v r s 1 f 311 Foot Ar I- app I l A Z d i y 1' w ftawi pR 3h Y 4 yy4R 4 1/ S a 3xk SY c e r q w 1. a H T r I 9j e e 1 4rf L uECHA. ICAL per- Y writer t 5 w work ag a T A. 4 i r by ordlna b- p S a Y T X r ti i rE xr r- 4' t oand 1 f 1y e e L 3 1 t i h s t 1 h 4 ECAUBE N ob- 44 T 0 44 0 pia O YER PAT yrT 4 r d rv h T. A a fF rJn verstly/ HT kill going e muscle-.called or YNAMITE en. 7n I they s z retfs d ijt WI B of in acct 4 scientist fprm dif- M ACIUNISTS bXhorse n tons y or removed n s aces HE b t 5. 44 W rTH T penetrated tfae Ulan w3c x t. eh 1 H. hATe covert d t says Dr.MaeMil- 2 s harry r a J F PC Jt r - ¬ - ¬ ' ¬ - ¬ ' , . * * . . ' ' ¬ . * ' . , * : * * . * ; . . * . - - , . . ( . ! ( ¬ , : " . . " . " , > . - - . : " . , . 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