The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia on December 3, 1905 · Page 3
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The Atlanta Constitution from Atlanta, Georgia · Page 3

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THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION tVOL. XXXVUL No 171 ATLANTA GA. SUNDAY MOHNING DECEMBER 3 1905. ITVE GENTS. Billy Smith Has Made Good Beginning for His Team Some Old Favorites Will Play on Local rield No More Except as Membera of Visiting Teams. New Comers Are Plentiful. Now that the minds of the sport lovers have been relieved from the pressure of JtootbaH there is time and space l ft for the subject of baseball From now on until the coming of another spring brings south tie new Firecrackers and the Lajoied Clevelanders baseball gossip -will be about all the sport that can be offered to the fans Tier wni be Indoor baseball and basket ban. and possibly few other sports I S of various Idndf but none-of them have I the foHowtnsr and none will receive the enthusiastic support given- baseball and footban. Manager Smith has been hustling ever since assuming charge of the Atlanta team and the players lie has already ecnred for next season look good enough /to ISbe tfao who ere familiar wIth their records and know anything of their ability. B cords Tell Nothing Records however do not alwajs Jell the story of a player's worth. Take Matthews of Birmingham as one in stance of the truth of this statement For several rears Matty has done little in the hitting line to Judge from his record nor baa his fielding looked exceptionally good viewed from a Spalding or Reach guide book. But Matty has been there with the goods has made Birmingham what she is more than any other player on the team and would be an acceptable man to almost any club In the league Tn list of plaj ers secured by Manager Smith up to date. Including also the nr-n who are destined for a change of ciubs but are still local property are as folows Atlanta Players List. Inflelders. Stafford at first Jordan at second. Morse at short McCay Gettlg and Hoffman at thifd outfielders Saflth Winters Crozier. Rlckert and possibly Curtis catchers Fox Brennan. Dunne .KelkhofC and Dunlap. pitchers Raymond Zellers Buraum. Harley Collins Curtis Of course there are Mfi" and "buts1 connected with this list given above as there always are with all the Jists com piled before a season opens A number of the men given above are booked Tor trades a number of others havo nome kind of string tied to their contracts others want to get away from Atlanta and still others are nominally at least the property of other clubs. Stafford is booked to go. He will probably be the manager of the Little Rock club although the deal a not yet a certainty as the papers have not been signed and there is room for the old often mentioned slip. Stflt Bob wants to get away from Atlanta. He has done good work in this city and has both hit well and fielded welL. But all the time Bob has had the idea that he anould be tbe manager of the team or at least he has often been changed with this ambition He may make Little Rock a good manager and Atlanta fans hope he will. Wtth another manager on the Atlanta team however. Stafford is hardly desirable and will go to omo other club should the Little Rock deal fall through by any chance Another man will cover first base. The man has already been pfcked from the ranks- of the South Atlantic League .but nothing definite can be done for a num. ber of months at least. Jordan Expected fcack. It Is not believed that Jordan will stick in Cleveland and he is counted upon for second base. Cleveland Is not even counting on Jordan but has mad other arrangements It is hardly probable that -other American League clubs will want tha Atlanta captain of last season as Be is not able to hit in big league form no matter how good hls fielding "When I was In Memphis. said Billy Smith recently after his retarn from the Southern League meeting "everybody was telling me what a good man Jordan i Thej said he is undoubtedly the test man the Southern League had last year. ilorse -will be the short coherer for another "year He Is willing tocome back and try another season pf Atlanta air gladder than- he would be under other conditions on account-of the- fact' that he worked under Billy Smith on the MUnroe team before coming to Atlanta. At- third base Smith seems to be well Bupplled Gettlg and Hoffman have been secured tp fight t out for this place. Gettlg comes well recommended. "He Is undoubtedly the best man you could have roped Is said Matthews of Birmingham recently "He is fast as a streak covers all kind of ground hits wen and. piays the game. He will snow up the other Southern Leaguers" Hoffman comes to Atlanta from tho Jackon club in the Cotton States League Some time ago Billy gave out the tip that he bad Tgn d this man. i ut fas waiting to hear from Secretary Karrcil la order-to learn whether \he man was free to sign or noL When the Cotton. States League broke up last year. Hoffman went to Oakland and played fin ball. He- is a .youngster who is almost sure to stick. Catchers in "Sufficiency. Behind the bat Smith is counting upon Wff new-comers Donne. Dunlap and Katthoff. Kalhoff is an old-timer who can both hit and field and use his head aajwell. He comes from the Cotton States League. Dunne Is a youngster an amateur/ but he can hit and field is a. bfg fellow and stands up at the plate meets the ball wlth a snap and ha plettty of ginger. Dunlap played In the CottonXStates last yearfl and was with Memphis the year before. Brennan win not be with Atlanta top another year. Billy Smith will try to land bJmin the Cotton States or In the Smith. Atlintlo Llsgue. There Is also greet doubt as ttT the return of Fox who wlQ probably be traded. Zellers and Bunrom wS3 ADDS TO TEAM las About Closel Deal Childs and Stinson. Atlanta Manager Has Completed Deals for the Service of Curtis Outfielder and Hoff man a Third Base man. Billy Smith manager oj the Atlanta team la going out after the world's record In signing up baseball players for the Firecracker far th season of 1908. A telegram rom the Atlanta manager In Macon. wtoexe he Is attending a meet ing of the Elti lodge states that he has signed up Hoffman third baseman of the Jackson team in the Cotton States League and Curtis outfielder of the Springfield team and has about put the finishing touches to the deal tor the ser\lees of Stinson outfielder of the Macon club and Chllds pitdher -with Charles ton last season. These little doings of Manager Smith ill prove of interest toAtlanta fans now that football la at an end. Billy Smith also states in his message to The Constitution that he has not as jet completed the deal by which Bob Stafford goes to tittle Bock. Hoffman Is considered a star of the first water. He played with Jackson in the Cotton States League last year and then finished the season with the Oakland club The year before he was wtth the Chicago team for a short time. Stinson ta another of Billy Stnith's n favorites. H Is a good outfielder and should make good with Atlanta. Billy does not state whether Stinson was free to sign or whether the deal was made with the Macon club Chllds pitched three games tor Atlanta toward the close of t&e. Powell regime and did so well that Atlanta tried to get hhn for the next year. He was drafted however by Plttsburg and then turned over to Mike Finn's team in the American Associations the Toledo own ers believing Childs worth- securing. He was wfld and ailed to make food. He was then turned back to Charleston where te pitched several games last year. So long as he has control he Is an excellent man for a team. .Tjhere was a chance some time ago that Atlanta would secure Llpe. third baseman of the llaoon team for the 1908 Firecrackers iracon was hot after her old favorite however and as Atlanta did not especially need bis services the Maeonlaa -will return to his 1905 team which he will manage. Understood That He Has Re ceived Handsome Offer Old Vandertrflt Flayer Has Made Wonderful Success -with His' Two Piep Teams in Ten nessee and Georgia It Is understood that the University of Georgia football management has made Frank Blake of the Gordon institute team at Barnesvllle. a handsome offer to coach the red and black next season. Georgia has passed through another rather disastrous year on the gridiron caused by the fact that only one old Georgian returned to college at he beginning of the season. This year the team was made up of green material men picked from the freshmen and sophomore classes all ot whom are expected to return to college next season. Dickinson who coached the tearn this year. Is tired of the task and will not return another season. It has become necessary for the Georgia management to get actlvely lnto the hunt for a suita ble man for the position and Blake looks about' the best in this neck of the wocds Of course there is a big difference between coaching a prep team and a college bunch. Not that his material will be better or worse but on account of tbe fact that h will probably b InterfereJ With more by a college management. Blake is a splendid man. judging from his record with the two prep teams he has coached to the championship of two states and he should give Georgia a chain lightning team tf he can be in duced to make the attempt. S iit Jloren having gone up where ft is hoped they -will make good. These three look good enough locally Added to them will be Curtis of Sedalia. who won somel -thing like 70 per cent of his games last season and Harley a cracking good pitcher when with the New Tor State league. He pitched a few games for Boston Nationals last eason. Collins is a new-comer In the outfield There win be change George Winters Is borfked for right field and Billy Smith for center. Crozier wants to get away to another club and a deal may be made for him. Last year Dick wanted to go to the coast. Nothing definite has as yet been done. If -Curtis comes to Atlanta as expected he will' also be given a chance to see what he can do. Noblett will be utility man on the team. One or two clubs In the Southern -want Bernle McCay. Ohartey Frank wants Dick Crozier. j Billy Smith -may sign u Chllds for next season as Childs was In Atlanta last week\ talking It over wlth the. At lanta manager. Childs pitched three games forxAUaota at the close of the IS04 season. TECH TO FULL TEMil Oay Roberts and Butler the Only Doubtful Ones/ Management Will Very Probably Arrange -Games tritb Vanderbilt and Auburn for Next Season. From a 1905 viewpoint the Tech football prospects for the fall of 1905 look about the brightest of any college in the south. According to the Tech men the chances are all In their favor that practically the entire Tech team will return to college I- t another year. It rcoks a little like counting phick- e 3 before they are hatched. It Is true for tiiere are many things likely to happen which w.li prevent the return of men to a technical school. fftill from a present standpoint the n-en will all return and that is the" best that can be said There are two or three men in the senior class who will have tc take some other course to come back or to take post-graduate courses but even those men say they would like to retu'-n and are considering doing so. Day i a member of the senior class and Is considered the most proBable man to leave college after this year Sflll. Day nant to return and. according to his college mates will do so fans is another senior but the chances are in favor at his return to college 3.1 there are many of the team members In fa or of making him captain for' 190S. Butler may not return but wh n asked som' tlma ago as to the men wha1 wculd not return he did not include him/1 sef In the excluded list t Captain -Clark is pretty sure to be j back when the fall of 1906 comes near and tho eall to football practice Is sent cut by Coach Heisrnan who still has two years of his contract to fill Brown whose panting this year has botn of the highest order ea high In- d as to give him fair claim at least to a place on the All-Southern will be track unless the unexpected happens. In turn Teen has the best punter In Dixie today. His work in the Tech-Clemson Same while it did not receive any espe- note was one of the features of the game. Once he got off a long drive over the head of a Clemson quarter for a roll of 5 jards and On another cca- s'tn the pass was very poor but he picked the ball up and shot It over the charging line as a Clemson man reached him. He has not missed a punt ttls year and has always done bU part offensively and defensively. Track Just Suited Major Dainggiiield Though the Major Was Always the Favorite He Seemed Beaten by the Long Shot Parade Un- jtu the Last Furlong. New Orleans December 2 Heavy'rain during the forenoon made the Crescent City Jockey Club tracks a sea of slash today The weather Interfered but little with the attendance but it upset bet ting calculations and MaJor-Daingerfleld and Van Ness were the only winning favorites. The latter was run up to SI.500 after his xaee and sold to Harry Brolaskl. The principal number on the card was the Magnolia selling stake a mile dash worth SI.650 to the winner Major Dalngerfleld who ws greatly favored by the state of the track was a strong fa voritet at odds on and though apparently beaten at the head of the stretch came fast under urging at the final furlong and won out by a head from the long shofT Parade who made all the running SewalU the western boy who is occupying the center of the stage Just now rode a very poor race on Caprice the fa- vorite In the second but redeemed hlrui self by a well judged ride .which landed Roderick winner In the tth-a. H Iso rode Van Kess. but the gelding required little help. rf. Loglstnia was a well supported favorite in tb5 last race but was never promi nent ilonco MaW thoroughly at home n the eolne winning all the way. FIRST RACE-Six luriongs 100 eeman 8 tol won Glen Si Sehannesen 8 to 1. ooi 103 Crunmlns 8 to I "IT 2-5. Teddy Brookwoo gary- Ghat- and Atlas also ran. 8 ECOND RACE-Six furlongs Rolla 103 Perkins 9 to 5 woa. Caprice 100 Sewein 6 to 5 second. Excitement 108 tuna 5 to I. third. Time lifsrss. Gold oTOUfeh Stack ood and. Holloway "THIRD RACE-One mile- Roderick 102 CSewe 5 to I won Edify 8i Mo- Gee 5 to 2. second Cashier. 88 M. Murphy 3 to I. third. Time 1:402-5. Randolph and Arch also ran. t OURTH RACE-One mile the'Magno lia .selling stakes r Major Dalngerneld 112 I Brown 7 to 10 won Pasadena. 101 Freeman 12 to t. second. LJeber 85 Schilling 9 to 2. third Time 1.45 3-5. Novena .Payne Ruth W. Flavlgny and T Dollnda also ran. I FIFTH RACE Six rurkmgst Van Ness ICf SeweH t to 3-worr. InsolthTUt 101 1 Sh -ry 10 to l.i secondr J. TV. O 1. Ward 6-to I third. Time 1:184-6. DOB Alvaro. Tom ilanklns. S noa.Kent Many Thanks and Sneer also-ran. 8IXTH RACE One mllerMonoco'Mald 87 FreeB.anV-S to 2 -von Logistfila 37 f wrty. 7 to I. second Mr. Jack 103 Keys 13 to t third. Time 1 8. Antl- meny. Cashier Ed Early Wedgewood. Roderick. Arab May. ConsueJo II and John Randorpih also ran. FEATURE EVENT Planters' Stake Tata by Simons Horse. Though Track at City'Park Was Almost Flooded Footing Was Fairly Good Fifteen Books Tcfek Bets from the Public. Xew Orleans December 2 Although the weather was extremely ttnfavoraoli the attendance at City park was again large. Bain feU in torrents aioxrt noon and continued at intervals all the after noon. The track was almost flooded but the footing which was reached through the slush was fairly good One of the bookmakers doing business in the ring laid off on account of it but as two who have been booking at the fair grounds came 01 er. the total was raised io 1ST. Victories were evenly divided between favorites and non-favorites The stake e\ent of the 3aj the Planters was won easly by Albert Simons' Monterey at odds on. There was a killing made on the last race which was won by Sheen in a drive. She ceened at 10 to I and was backed to 5 to I City Park Summaries. FIRST RACE Seven furlongs. Adeaao 102 Koerner 5 to I won. Dr. McCluer 95 Dlgglns 9 to 2 second Cam bridge 104 Mount 2 to I. third. Time 1,352-5 Ferronlere Pirate's Dance Lleber Gore and Gray Dan ran. SECOND RACE One mile Virgle I "miners 89 Koerner H to 5. won I Fallen Leaf 89 Fisher 9 to 2 second Blue Grass Girl 103 Taylor 4 to I J third. Time I BO. Miss Nannie L. rora I Klley Deer Hunter ran. I THIRD RACE Mile and a quarter Harr Stephens 8 Koerner 4 to I. won. Sanction 94 Morris 9 to 10. second. Doeskin 88 Dlgglns 12 to .third Time 2116 1-5 Show dTH Evan- kill. Double Rough and Tumble ran. FOURTH RACE-Six furlongs Planters' staket Monterey 118 NteolJ. 3 to 5 won Orbicular. MS Morrison 6 to I second Kercheval 123 Allen 12 to I third. 'Time II92--S. Rain Devil. French Nun Roseboro Manoeuvre snd Poetry ran FIFTH RACE Six furlongs Bryan. 105 NlcoO 3 to 6. won Shawana. 103 OberQ. 5 to I second Janeta 109 Koerner 8 to I third. Time 1:19. B r "Stone tan SIXTH RACE Five furlongs Sheen 94 Myers 12 to I won "Wild Irishman 107 Nlcol 6 to 5. second Mono- chord 109 Tailor 10 to I third. Time 1:052-5. Cjgnet Czaraphlne. Bensonhurst and Black Fov ran. City Pork Entiles for Monday. First Race Five furhmgsr Miss .Point. Kite Tatt. Lady Esther- Balshot Polly Perkins Rama Poetry. Goma 110. 1 Second Race Six furlongs selling La Cache Knowledge Chambtee The Laurel Town Moore Major Carpenter. 102. Josette 104 El Rey Flying Charcoal Monochord Precious Stone Tom Crabb A r 107. Big Stone. Rankln I OS. Third Race Six furkmgs selling Laura. Hunter Clifton Boy Ethel Davis. Jack Adams. Marco. Immortelle. .Never More 102 jack Ratlin 104 Berry Hughes 105 Jdelnwood IJ8 Magistrate 110. Fourth Race Mile and an eighth St Tammany Little Boy Rolling Boer Lura Lighter 102 Estrada Palms 105. Fffth Race Mile and a sixteenth sell ing Fox Hunting. 68 Janeta Evasklll 103 Red Fox 100 Tete Jfolr 101 York shire Lad 107. Sixth Race Six furlongs Rickey. 101 Leta Duffy 105 Van Guard Rain Devils 104 Chief Ha es. Daring 108. PARLOR RIFLE OLD TENNESSEE LOST TO GRANT Though Coach Assisted the Volunteers They Could Not Win in Rain Chattanooga Tenn December 2. Upon a field covered'with water and through out a never-ceasing downpour of rain the Grant university eleven this after noon defeated the University of Tehne see at League park by the-sco of 5 to 0 On account of the absence of one of its star players from the game Grant allowed Tennessee to play iTupre its present coach and formerly Michigan's star half bacte v The Grant team made its touchdown the better WOT and m the latter part of the game held Tennessee for downs with the ball In 3 feet of the-Grant goal MERCER SIGNS SEWANEE COACH t f Hyatt Ha Sent Signed Con tract to Mercer Asso ciation. Macon Ga December 2. Special Hyatt the Sewanee football coach has forwarded to the athletic authorities at Mercer ta signed contract to the effect that he will begin coaching January 1 and remain wjth the fiercer team until June I. His salary wUl be about l35 per month the-largest sum ever given to a coach by Mertferv The prospects Tor a winning team are aright as good material is ia college and Hyatt knows how to develop It The college is Just recognizing the ben efit accruing front a successful athletic season.- and is determined to -spare neither expense nor labor In developing this phase of college life If Hyatt satisfies the4 authorities he win be retained as a football coach next yean and Mercer will endeavor to put out a good team and will meet Georgia Tech and. other big teams on the gridiron. There is slight probability of her ever playing Gordon m Utute or Locust Grove In the futures Hyatt will proba bly be made permanent Athletic director next year. FUTEIff McPherson Beat Barrancas Williams Was the Star of the Visiting Team While Kofer four- ron and Litky Played Well for the Seventeenth Begiment. In a blinding rainstorm two army team t ed up at Fort McPherson yesterday and when the finish of two twenty-five minutes' halves had come the Sevententh eleven was wet and happy victors by a score of JI to 0 c\Pr the boys from Fort Barancas The 3me was arranged several dajs i x and as it was impossible for the vtfting plavera to remain in the cK tier tttee. It was decided to- play despite tlie bad weather. Mr. C'Donnell of Pennsylvania was selected for referee and Lieutenant Kel- s. n was the umpire. The Seventeenth started off the racket with" grinding mass plajs through the llae which their opponents' found hard to stop. Straight down the field the Seventeenth rushed the ball while the wet crowd applauded the going. Finally there were but a few yards left to the gcal and Kofer. fullback was sent plunging through for the first touchdown. The secoi j was made in the first na'f by the came kind tff play. In tho second half the visitors braced U tm'l 'while they were unable to score hfmsel\es they kept their opponents icm treating Into the scoring division. For Barancas. Captain Williams full- ack was the star. Tears ago he was captain and star player on the Carlisle team end yesterday's brilliant play on a. w t field proved that he. had not lost t c cunnjig of hls-college days. Time and again he smashed through he oprosing line and stopped the run ner in hJs tracks without I yard of tain. Time and again when given the ball he added long gains to the credit of Baiancas On the defense his work was tie best of the afternoon. For the Seventeenth Kofer Pourron and Litky were the stars. All three played splendid ball and it was argely 3ue to their individual efforts that Sarancas was kept from scoring. Lieutenant Xftl&on Is In charge of the athletics at Fort McPherson. He is trying to persuade other teams' to try bout on the McPherson gridiron. Tempting Inducements have been offered to Fort Screven and to the Jacksonville Athletic Club but no definite arrangements cave as yet been made. Lieutenant Nelson Is an old Auburn rlaver. He went to the Alabama col lege from 1892 to 1897 then to Mary- lanr university for two years' playing on the team. He also played on the DuQuesne Athletic Club team and on the Maryland Athletic Club ejeven but not play at West Point. Crowd Out for Get-toay Feature of Card the Fourth Bace at Three Miles Was Easily Taken by Ben Crockett the 3 to 5 Favorite. Benniag D. C. December 2. A large crowd witnessed "get-away" day at Ben ning The feature of the 'card was th fourth race at three miles.-5 which Ben. Crockett the 3 to 5 favorite took eashy The track was. very heavy and the talent faud badly only two favorites winning. Thte match race was a very mill betting affair. Bettle. Bouncer being hel at the prohibitive odds of I to -4. In the handicap steeplechase Rockmart fell broke a leg. and was destroyed. FIRSlT RACE Mile Free Booter. 106 J. J. Walsh 3 to t won Jdhn Amearn III J. Walsh 30 to'l. second Thistle- dale 114 J. Jones 7 to 9 third. Time. 1-43 1.5. Royal Window. Gunston Mu koday Gavin C. Dr. Swartz Little Buttercup ran. SECOND RACE Five furlongs Son- fire. 106 Helgeaen 8 to I. won Am bitious I OS Bell 6 to I second Or flamme 104 J. Johnson 10 to I third. Time 1:04 3-5. Listless Edict Pa Ia Cassandra. Qulrtve. Fighting Girl Wa terway. Sweet Flavla ran. THIRD RACE -Handlcap steeplechase about two miles Cherry Fighter. I4 Heidorn 10 to I. won Howard Lewis 152 A. Johnson 8 to I. secondnFollow On. 149 Mr. Kerr 4 to I. third Time. 4:18. Butter Ladle "Son of Erin Par- nasus. Qypsle. Esperchance ran. Rockmart fell. I FOURTH RACB-Three miles Ben Crockett III Bomanelli 3 to 5 won Ostrich. 107 Miller 5 to 2. second No blesse Oblige 97 J Heifler 12 to third Tithe. 4-39. Louis H. ran. FIFTH RACE Seven furlongs Rlcor do. 110 Miller 6 to 2. won Nom d Plume. 115 Romanelll 8 to 5 second Salt and Pepper 110 Springer 5 to 2. third. Time 1:33-5. Lelchtmess Sue Mac Father D-i Clover Croft and Flow About ran. SIXTH RACB-MHe and forty yaris OmondM Rtefht. 133 Shaw 8 to won Bohemia. 126 Miller 12 to I second To can U2 J. J. Walsh 12 to I htrd. Time 1:453-5 Robbie Kean Sidney C Love. Pet r Love. Tom Waddell Tribe Hill. Sailor Boy ran. SEVENTH RACE Match race six fur olngs BPttte Bouuer. JIO-fMller I to 4 won Welborn. I to J. Jones 2 to time taken on Account ot fog Coach McQugin To JCashvffl" December ft/-iA th meir ber of/ the Vanderbfftt football te m went on the field Thur day to battle with 5 wan e. Dan McGcgln their coach o Michigan announce to them .his marriage next Wednesday to Miss Irwwen Fite daughter of on of the most proml nent business men of r hvill "Hurry "Dp" Tot win 4 jwst mm. TIE GAME PLAYED BY ARMY AND NAVY TOOTSIE DOUGLASS. Tennessee Boy Who Made Navy' Touchdown. ff lOOTSlHUS Former .Tennessee Star Tied Came for Havy. Knozville Boy Well Known in Atlanta UTS Flaying at Princeton WSIca Scpt West Point frem Winning Victory Over Annapolis. Knoxville Tenn. December 2 Spe cial. It was the playing of a Tennessee boy formerly a star atthe University of Tennessee whose great playing has oesn een on gridiron and diamond In Atlanta which enabled the navy to tie the game at Princeton yesterday and cheat West Point of a victory which tire-supporters of the army thought already won. "Toots" Douglas who played on Tennessee's great team of 1002. when Se. wanee was beaten and Vanderbilt given close call. Is now a midshipman at Uncle Sam's naval academy. He went Into the game "yesterday near the end of the second half when defeat seemed certain for the navy and it was this great halfback who carried the ball across the army goal line. Douglas whose real name is Archl bald Hugh though he la better known as "Toots. is a son of A. J. Douglas now of Chattanooga but formerly of Knoxville and is at the Naval academy 1 for his second year. I Douglas was with the Tennessee base-1 ball and football teams which iplayeir Georgia Tech In Atlanta In 1902 and his work there attracted much attention and won him many friends. BY LUST Only Ten Minutes Tata Out for Injured Flayers Thanksgiving Day Game Was Finished in a Hurry Pleased the Crowd and Broke All Records. If e\er an object lesson was driven into tbe heeds of football coaches this thing swas done last Thursday afternoon when the Teoh-Clemson game was rushed through in record time. Before 'the game an arrangement was made between the two elevens by-whlch the time to be taken out by both teams for injured players totaled 30 minutes or 15 minutes for each team. The game was finished in record time. The two "teams combined took out just a Jittle over 10 minutes of time. Tech men were injured more often than were Clem son players due largely ter the Tougher tackling of the South Carolina men. Tech took out during both halves the total of 7:24 minutes while Clemson took out 2 59 mlnutes or a total for both elevens of 10.23 minutes. 'the majority of this time was taken out in tEe second "half as in the first half not more than three minutes was consumed by Injured men. The game was faster prettier and fewer men were Injured than is tunny the case though the game was fierce and hard fought from start to finish. The game1 started at 2.30 o'clock and was finished "before 4-30 o'clock or played during the time that light reigned. The referee did- not flnd it nei.'Ssang to call time on account of darkness. The'men did not lay out because they felt they might need the time later on. and both teams-left the field tn ehspa to nave played another half. The game was a good precedent. CONTEST WAS POStPflNED. Ail-Around Exhibition at Atlanta. Athletic Club Will Occur Nfert Tuesday. The contest between the Jiu-jitsu ex perts and the other numbers on-4he pro gramme of the Atlanta Athletic"-Club booked for last night wera postponed on account of the inclement weather until Tuesday night. Tbe two Japanese jlu-jltsu" experts will .appear at the club Tuesday night as arrangements will be made by which their other engagenren will be canceled. One of them will be retained by'the club for one week and probably longer. All kinds of exhibitions ot sport win be given' at the club Tuesday night In cluding boxing wrestling fencing basket ball. Indoor- baseball fcanoball class work and bar work Wesf Point and Annapolis Each Secured One Touchdown and Kicked Goal GAME WAS WITNESSED BK EHESIDUT ROOSEVELT Army Touchdown Vaa Largely the Result of Wind Blocking Navy's Z3ck Holding by Army 21an Started Eush in Which Navy Scored. Princeton. Jf. Jv December 2. Army 8 Navy To jtte few thousand of men of Annapolis and West Point this score was the aH-absorbing topic but to the great irajority of the 25,000 persons present it conveyed simply the intelligence that there 'had been a football game played en Osborne field and taat neither team a as victorious. While the game was one of the most xcHlng ever played between the two institutions. It was simply the side show to thft royal football event -of the sea- sea. From an sections of the Vaited States came ipectaton who ordinarily would not travel a score of miles to see a. football contest All this was. doubtless brought about by the fact that President Roo s- vc-t was to be present seated to the east and west stands where were the genuine football enthusiasts. There vere uproarious cheers for the quick dashing runs and sighs for the attempts which failed but the dashing runs were few. Once Toraey got away for a pretty run of 36 yards which brought the army supporters to their feet. Decker oa one occasion electrified the "navy rcoters by almost getting away from the army eleven. Only the slippery condition of the field prevented Decker from doing some remarkable work. Bad Kick Aided Army. For tha first twenty-five minutes of pay the ball was almost continuously la the navy territory. It would be car ried to within striking distance of tha rsTy goal only to be lost either on flo-wns or on an attempted place kick. Jfear the close of the first-half thefcray got the ban on the navy's 25-yard .Una oa an exchange of kicks. Howard who kicked brilliantly for Annapolis sept -a spiral high la the air. The easterly wind carried the ball back toward tbe navy goal 80 that In distance it had. traveled tot xnoro than 3 yards. Fronvtbis. point the West Pointers carried the ball over for a touchdown. A West Point player was responsive for the tie game. On an exchange of kicks within ten minutes of the close of the game the nary had the ban near. mlafleld. Howard sent a beautiful punt back to the West Point goat As- the navy eleven started down the field ar army man was detected by Cra- plre Wrenn holding one of the navy. As a penalty the ball was brought back and given to the navy on the Army's 36- yard line. la test- desperate effort th Annapolis boys placed the ball on West Point's 16-yard line. They lost It. but the' Army was forced to kick. Again the Navy got the ball on the Army a 4O-yard line and carried it back 2O-ards. Here they kicked and Johnson fumbled. An Annapolis boy was on the pigskin in a"1 flash. At this point Douglass was sent in at left halfback' and Smith at fullback for Annapolis. The change had a bracing effect on the Navy eleven. With re newed 'fierceness and determination Douglass carried the ball over for a touchdown. Norton who had replaced Becker kicked the goal. It was donejso only the players and referee could sea where the ball went through the posls. When the Annapolis boys were assured that the score had been tied their en thusiasm was unbounded. They threw their caps flags and anything they could grasp info the air. Th y -did not cease their Jubilation until the result of tho conference between captains referee and umpire announced the .conclusion of the game. -The game had ben called four minutes before time was up a most un usual occurrence buts the fast gathering darkness made this necessary President Watcfced Game Closely. During thje excitement incidental to th Navy's touchdown the president who had kept his eyes riveied'on the game from the beginning leftvhis seat In tne Army stand and accompanied by Presi dent Wilson of Princeton several secret service men secretary Loeb and a bait dozen policemen. walked briskly from the grand stand. Tha demonstration accorded the president wnen he erflkred the field and also the thunderous cheers which greeted him as between the halves when he left hist seat in the Navy stand and walked across to the Army stand were very hearty and spontaneous. The president was apparently gratified with the hearty re ception. From the time he entered tha grounds at the southwest corner of Os- Dornr field until he" reached the box In tha Navy's Section the cheering was continuous and tie received a .Blmllar- greeting as he crossed to the east stand. president Roosevelt's day In PrlAartOa was a very enjoyable one. From tbe moment he stepped from the train until ha departed for the capital he was cheered by the enthusiastic -football spectator After thq president left the football field he returned to the club bouse of tha Princeton Athletic Association wbere h remained for aSTSl twenty minutes. It was 5:29 o'clock when the presidential party entered the special train but owing to 'the heavy travel the train did sot leave here until 6:18 p. m While watting for the train to start some 4f the crowd asked the president how" he enjoyed the game and tha pre i dent amllingly replied "Ohv an right. Among\.tnose who saw the gam Oiii crover Clev lani f P Hor aa I. ATLANTA. JONSTITU. T. 10. N 'u c XXXVlll.-Nol'll TTA- GA.i St DAY M9 llG QEOEMB R 1 5. R mt s BAS mALL DOPE NOW IN SASON Billy"Smith Beginn ngfor o Mem'b ni'of th of' tbaJ1 and F W tbe baseb .ll c fp ca. b \Q an Ibly v no e.or thetonC1rtlrgand 'One recein .8. and. u tO b Xt 8ea.Son gQO f tto' lti 1s. Ca.m1J.iar"WIth rd. f rellNothing. J1owe playe s m- 8 For'.seve 1 .1 r ar3 -thehJt ng j dge hl tlo aI1y rOm Re tCh th re Is. The ii t ofpJa'ers t e aredestlned fora. S rol Mgrseat unie and''bntS wlthU1.8 U6t3c m- pUe f..bdore'as ason 'opens. A'nwnber'lOf bo ked.Qt" ba B i string. away A till Pro erfy gor Hewnx' th Ltttle'Rock fs ot Blgned.'pd otten.mentroned B At- 1anf n W'elk.But Il 'of Uretea.m 'or ai bltl.cvt. may and.AUanta a other. r A atrta .ad.-tit ab uId an1"ch8.nC 'mati t lan. h n ran o .AtJariticLeague .but ack. It.l.s f r cond Is' venoOuntl 1gon a leth f"oother nntths' S n. a. e .8 JI lg no'matter go d fi ld.lng. Wa.s- Men li.s. a er the' Lea e 8.8 te1lin' is. The 'ui1doubt y tl es.lman Lea e oTte' another" ye r. to. coine ack aJr..gladder U m account -of th work d' on rd l U red It Getugconies' well'1"eO mmended. tman -ou o uld h veropeJ J saldY3.1thews tI Is' 'as str ak 'oonrs' I d'plaist1 e how up the9ther SoutheTDLiea.guers. Hottrian--Omes J acb n.ilub .in- 6ta tes gave be' b\dl'fp 'thb. man. t .fr m Sec.r tary Order t.3 lea.row-hether fn 'i 'OrDol When'the Le gue b uP' 'we nd'pJayed tl.n. 'Is. -3 ut gster ost .toStlck. u n hJ nnr-co nd ano1d-Um rwhO .ca.nboth:111t apdWlehis 'the s 'ieJ e. 'Ie' an heca.n bfg'f Il a.nd-stands 'at meeta"ih be.1lrwlth ana W 'pl ntf"of Dun1applaY d lli Cott ri'8ta.t. Slart and. M mphf. 'BrennaniwlU'lI.ot i e w thAtlanta. Or. I 1 ther" Lr'BWY.Smlth wi11.tzy 1andbm J 1o C n.S or-J .fhe. S mth AtfaJito"uqulf..TMreis a.lS a. t'db a.t. eretn t 'Fo Who.'WlItJII'Ob8.b1ibetraded. f O1d i 42e1Ie1 BW'I11ImwW MAN4GER SMITH AboutClose eal WJth Deals01" O goIng'.outafter thewor1d'a Firecr keTS at the .8 ason from acon. &tte ng Etkslodge. t Spr 1igfi ld or l nager wlll Co tball 'atat s ConsUtu Ii 'et Horrman.1s tlnIshedthe s 1 .f'"oreh S on l Smith'sMa- COn lIe ood sh 1ld Stl son to' lab. tched f I clOle. r gtme'I' .n e bkeP1 t i T ledo' own-j i p1tch d vera1 ere i bM a.n i- and 1d 11Is.serv1ces. .wnl ret 1 111 m e. GEORGIA TrAM S KING 8LAU Und rsto d T at HeHas Re- c ived I und .rstOod'tha.t of- manaiementhas the Utut.e e.vUIe- next seaa n. by act J Georglanreturn d h te n men tres en alloC w-.h m. t 'the te.aIh ye r -18 t.he' tid ret rn Lno her' It. .acUvelyinto for'the eb oitttb 'olthe oteourBether 1s.a tweeuco hlng 'a. ge bU 1clk rwol"e. account ott.he tht .t he. J1' 1i bly IS' man f 'O e as coa hed giveGeo tn- th be the old pltch 1 ack. Sl1ith and Mor goneup.- wh r flls t r e- enol1ghlocaUr. t or lia. 'som -thi gtke 70. Per' 1l ot sewlOn.andIIar ey 'a. th York games .atlonals 8 n w-c. mer. t 't 1ere wlllbe b o'ked f z rightfle1d t r Cr er"Want maybe Last"ear 'W .nte to' 'Xo hlng urtls comeS xt'E'ct hewlU' g en wbathe win. utUitym non Obart y' t wants'D1ck Billy-tSmlth.mq utI'Ch lds sea U.\ChUda Jt1AU nta" r' wlththe.U lan ma 'N' 'J itchedthree' lra.mes'fot'-A.Uanta' Ie "the .ISOt 1I. 'S 'c -.s" c "i.'n' RETURN HmJULL .oaf- n .BuU r. .0 0 bifu I N Seas brig te 0 Accor i.ng all'1n enUre'Tech re. -urn hr co ntlngchlck- h3befor theyare Is' 'ha w 1I 'the t tha.t.ls an are' two' t e m. en s nror d .ion dering II ye r. SIms s a.re' a s fa.vor fo wh.n the'men se f b3 en kta Jr n s t e r .H. el an stU1. two. I .0 -derso. hlgb. n- C ed cl m. t. unless'the rum. Te h rece.lve C'.aI Cl mson 15 rds po but' h Id a' rt UJS7U-1' atwa.yridonehs o FAVORIU TOOK MAGNOLIA StAKE MU 1 Major.oaing flel 1 l 2.-Heavy rain' tor nQOnma.Qe t we ther uP.5 tbet- M Jo Dalngert eld was. ra e t cat'dwas dUh'j .wort.h. D fngeTfleld.who th -as ra' I 0. n .r ent.- th f r- ng' headlrom.the. all:1he 'oc pylngthe v rite red emedhilUJ b thl h 1nthe 1t& Xeas b Lo 1tnla weU. the wasnever p.entiIA nco M athomen ihe'rolne- -wlnntng'all Optionao. Freeman 8'.to 1 GlenGallanto 103 Jehannesen I se ondKohtn- J. 'third. Time 1J172-a. BrimCul Va- andAUa.5 sE o -'D RA X turl ngS p kins to. 6tO aecon 1 nt toval J r a Goldsborouthr StGcltwO dand HoI oway a Ht RA ne' R derl SeweU,5 c- GeeS 2 eO 1d Cashter.ga thlrd..TIme IlWe Stahl'Joe IWldol ha.n4 A.rch8lsO mUeth -xagno-- aJor 7\ 10" Pa. ad\na 12tot seCondLleber-85 .1 :45.3-5- \V..F1aytgnr aJ80ran RACE-Slxturl ngs V nN ss. f to'c3.won 3nolth1ifti101 I tShe.I'Y I\s&ond" Y' eJI. t .thIrd. .Tlmet:18 .Alvaro-Tom. S1ni n Kent. r.Ian3'Thanks nd RA ne .ml1e- lonoCO "Maid. 07Fnemun..s' 2. LogistnIa.S7 hweolQi'7t 'I JaekC3 I. 1-48 mel17.'Cashl rEd'.Earl ROderlck.cArah11a.y.c d I1)lfal8ora.n i r. .1 WON BY MONTEREY .St te Ta en' J at. k 'Was Fai -ly To k the'- J X.Orlea-ns D C'tmber'2. A1th hJ w ther 'as unrama l 'J l rge..Ra.ln noon andcon'tinued 1.100d t f-oo ng throu h wasfalr- busin s laidort account it. b t twow th8"lalr gro nds over. th w s we e 'e enI 'bet eeri s. th da thl\ .Mo t r y o Tberewas by' oIen d .to' ba ked I. I S ven Adea"1 K erner c- 9 2. I Tlmel I :3s 2-5. lo'errot l re SECO D RACfr-One .toS af 8 F1sh r D.-to I. :50 NannleL. K eiill n nd 94'MorrlS.8. 10 12. I. l-s.Show GM.Evan- staktMonterey. Nicol d f va I 2-s 2 rivl RACE-SIx S ObeTtS I I O. Big-'Stone 'SIX' 'HRACE-Five furloIl s. "Sheen. 'man. I Q 1.- C'gnet..Czaraphlne Ben on ul"St'aMB1ackFov ral. Cityp'ukEn-aies e-.P'1ve Klte'Ta.n.c herBa. hat Goma..11 O. SecondRace-SIx turl s/ .TheLaurel. Carpenter.102 Josettelo.E1 Preclo s AyrI07 St ne. Rank.lnIOS. turmgsaelUng L .ur BoyEthel ImmOTtelle.NeverUore. 1102.Jack K1 IDwood M1l .nel&"hthf BoerLura Estrada.Palma. Race-M1lean'd Ihce-SIr GU rd. aln Hayes. 'RIFLE' .Co ch The 'R .in. Chatt&n oga. December fie d. coveted with t ou&"b- Qwnpourof'i'iW1 unive 1 ltyeleven tbisa1ter- lty Leagueopa.rk' the..sco'e' O. a.c nt e.or. nnessee V\J preltspre ent formerlilIlch1ga.n'sstarhalf 'G nt to hdowr bt rn.th "WIthbe baUln H Se LSign d'C n- T o Mercer.Asso- M c G n ber'2.-iSpe 1al.- theSewanee footba1lcoach'h3.8 athletc.authoriUes .a"slgneeVcontracttotheett ct 'lhathe-'wlU 'coa hlng.Jan ary an'remaIn cM rcer. ie i.m'unUI 1lJs"sa1a1Ywmb .bo tttl3 I nOn t tb .larget sum v r' tei coa b e r 'Th I. alt d n eaudi att I just.fecognUingthe'ben- efi t. Is. n lther. not'.labor'ln ig l1eze I Hta.tt1a fiesthe' iwinbereta.1ned.as tootbaUCOQOlJ nht. .to' agoodtea.mand' wnl'meetGeotg1 Tech'a.nd.'Clther'blg- 11rol'\ 1s81ightJl1obabWtyor I. PI&'fn. g in'Utut. or.LoCust e-permanezn.thletlc. GOOD FOOTBAll rURl in J BJn l g Rains.torrnl' Williams' our- .J Played-WeI1 Seve eenth ialn tol1Jl. e l MCPhersony s. tw .nty-flve c me II to.O' o 'pr W3.8. a- s wa rem ln r d lded 5\ 118 'b d 'C'Donnel PennsylvanIa fflete ad Leutenat f.n Te Stnntenth sarte' tt' rcket wHI gdlng 'm tbrouh 1:4 v' ich oppnelts h d' I tt lht down. feld Sen-I rshed t e bn whe cowd goln& Fnl1y 1et' g al fu1kwas set rl1gJ though the' frt seca'3.8 firs os Jr pla. tho send itors U arl wee nble thlm h'e teir opPnents flcm le ng lS olng divsion. For. C'tin WiIas b ck wa .theC rlsle te m &d briilt ply' fied pr\.e lat he 10 the unnLg hlscolEge d agin he. smahed Olf.oslng le stoPPe the-n' In"s trcks &n ad an gven bn h aded gln-s' credit Banca b ateron. Fr Se\enteeth. Pun Lty theltars A thee 1\ plyed splendid ba11 It. w age ther elorts 1atsnca' wa troi scornp. 'Leuenant X Mn .8 charge athetc lfcPhersn. Be I tr- Prsuae tea1 a ben ot@r d Seen J ac onwne 'Athletc defnle arn.nie et I Leutenant anold I nr. Abaa.cQl- I g 189 'Mry - Inr wlversly l r. playng n the te. alto. playe AtleUc tea rylnd Athleic even cUdnot' Wet Pot SASON GLOSS AT WASHINGTN Big -Crw Da l Fete Fouh mce T Me a11 Tae n Cckett t 3t 5.Favte Benig C. iece ber. 2-A "get-away'dayat Beng. 'aLd the fourt race t.hre mUes whlC Ckett tavOte. tokesiry wa adthe ent. faed baly fa" rites. w nlng Tte was.a. .ver Ud b tlg atalr. Bet Bou nc r h l te prohbltive ods I. fe h nlcap steeplech&e Rkm tei1 k f d r o J J.WalS wonj .JdnAmeari 'Wash to "I. Thiste- daa Jon .7 5. TI8 1:41 l. Rye.l Wiow. Guston M" ko. Gavn C.Dr. Swa Lte terp r SEOND' RCEFve trlongs Su- flr'IOS HelgElen .Am - blt s Bel OI-1 tmme thr.1 'mE. 1:0 Lsteu. Eict Csd Quvve. Grl. teray Swet Favia. RCEHandlcp. steeplebage. abuttwo Ies Cer 100 eorn Lewia 1t h t JjF 0:15 But Ldle EPar- nu -s 01sle. Espchanee Rk- ma.r.fen. Z I t f Otrich. 10 ler 2 'som No b esse Oblig 8 J. Hel er 1 ,1 ti i s ul nr IOrner.5 t 2 1 Pume t Pepp SprlnJr t 2 .t hld Tm. e. I :3. 23-5. LIC ht. e. Ftr Clovr ertandFow Abo t BIRC&Mne raTI'1 he f51 Mnfr l ICe I On. .TC. an. 12 J.J. .TIme 1:45 3-S. 'Robble'Ken Siney C.Lve Petf LveTomWac- delTI Hm..8lorBoy ran- s 'RCMateh rAcesIx' fur-'I olng Bptk BOer. JCHner.I..to 4. wnWelbot J. .Jom'IZto'I. 01d. No .tknn coun.fl& I h c 1 1 Sahm. Iem A tJp mem" r 'oyte Vanprt .footbli tm wentoDtEfeJd'Th ar tbtUf wth l' In'Mcn.t1eircch. of c nn anuDC t th4I'.1 ma- rnet WenedaY 1IIssImler .tedauhte. on4Cor le tot l.nltbue8men'e8hvUP 'u tP"oit .JJ I' .BrARJ ANDNAVY J f. .4 w-w- -w-w.w-w -w-w-w-w-w-w t. 1' f t t r t t t t. t DO GWS. 1 T nneuee WOido.NaVa t t UT TSU DOUGLS MADE TOUCHDOWN Forner J ennesseeStar Te f forK v Xox1eBy Xo'ldn At JantD.PIyg t Pc- we I fr m. Wig Vi to OveApU Koxle. Ten. Decb -2.-S cJa-I 'as plaYI forelY 'a stl'at'th Unhersty Tennesee wIs g at p1Ylng' hs ten ieen gn dln Atnta whlce bleJhe v .tot gaie Pnceton a et Wet P lnt .ora vitor whctfsppren 'of the' ay tught aeadY'-wn "Tots" Dulas plYe. Tn- n ssea leat te 180 whe. Be wan w beatn a' Vanderbt" gv a c L I now.a mshIpm Bam'a. naVaI'adem Hewet gme"metaneu'te 0 send hwhe.defeat Beeme oerr ortE' nav. gt hlta.ck C'ared the' ba aert thE ay 08 lne Du whoae.re' nae I .Ac. lIuih thCuhe bttkown a .4' .80n.o .A.J.Do 1 Ctt& ore1.ot K Xl "a. .bI. at. e Nan. lU. e I seconl ye. Dou&Js wth the'Tennee we bal ftba tes ye1 Geort''ech Mllnt lnl,802a h wor tiee. attate .Pch atent1 w n m tends. USSON. TAUGHT lASrGAM 'Teo atenOul fo .lnjuredPI iersl Thagvg. Ge' a Fi e.d i a1i PS.te CoW andBrb Al 1da. I objet .w dri b dsot tblc0ches. uil g .a d n1fTudY'aternon when'U e Teo Cems n gewai rshe thro gh iecord me. 'he' arnement wa me tee .th two eevensb whch ten bt teas lor1 red plare miute fOT eachtea The'gmwu'fnlhed .fnrecord tme. Te tw't mS combletook' jut JIU ofUme.'Teme wee lure mOTe ofen tatw r' C1 m- 'son playe1 due.1argeITto he 'oghr i tcklng of'he'Stb Carl1men toO utdun' bt halv-te totl whle' Clemso 2:58'mlnutesor' t I'fC .bth elevenri'of ilnate8 Te m8orityof thi Um..wu .ke tle s nd lf. a tnt H h te 'WS .cns ed byln me Te ge w f ter prtUer an fewer.me'were' Injur Jhals U1'Y thouJb "was' rlere toght trmst .tofnsb gr"'ISted 'at. o'clok wutshe'boe .4:300 clk playe theUme' tt lght 'rei ed. The' rerere dk fM.t ne s a .o cal te accout. .o k nes8 Tle/men did.Dot lay'otbeause Inlht.e ue" Utei on an bh telef m.lh& hve e asa. gp1cedent ONT ST WA 'PO1DNE. .I-AudE lr on t tnt 'Atletc Cub' oc tTeSy The. thejlu-jte- Pns and' nubr on e po gmm4 \ln At4Uc 'Cub bked. nght pstpne aot t .nclemetwethe p lu-jl uWi wn Tesay night a 8mets wl b mae engeI. canCle Ono Wl retined b the cub I oe. w I pbbly lonCe. Al' Jd'o ehlbtoD. spt 'wJ b gv..e..n.a.t th.e 'c I Ub."T. 4 nlg t. In.- cudlng 'bg.'wWn. encg. ket -no :1 bl.fa d 1o 4 "o West Poi tan AQ apols Seue 'a d. Kic ed 'GAM.WA WIN SSED 8YPRfSI KT'HOOSEVEl T y A'e 'ucd j Lglythe Rsut of..Wi 'Blo a- v' .c Hdg b.A - 1n S d Buh' WcNa' Sred Pcton. J.Deemb -AY e. Nve. 'o. efeW. toud' 'f e Aap1 ad WetP lt..ts sC re Ue t C gat rujo 5OOPrllS Prst C'orved Ilmiyth t1er'ha4 been'S fotaU gm Osrne feld. at 'uvctor. elraewuoe .mol j eve betw n tw I.U ons. was slpl ih sde th Taa tootblev nt fthes SCl. Fm' .fctons thetntSttu dme rnaY woulinot bavi r t e a' fQ al ontet. thsw3.8.doubUess. bro h abut t. Pe6d t Ro .t .b pent ate n h et W1.t' tnd. where.ere e'e JD fotb enthu1b re Jlprolr.- Itu thequckd hgr 8 sih' f r th atempt Whl fed -but. t dshi rs 'were Oc Torey awa apre y rot3ea whch brubt te ar"sprrto fEt Deer 00 one oclon eleedte IY riotu' 'by'aOI ctgaW' rm te ari. eeOJly slppery' c 4 iUonofjthe-feJdpevnted Deck r \1& se rmat'kble rk 'Bad Xck AidAry 1.t twenfi- ve mluteot pa Uebl 'wa tUlrlY lI .then1. temtor. I wUdb cr rt t .wth atg datn fta rsy. ionly to' 10st &s o o a' 'temped CL I Ne cloe 1.tbe V'y &otte ba o Dv. :25ya Un. otf'echa kcks H arwbo I fcke lIlaut11 AMpolS I' spaIhh,1 ar. esterf'nd r eaedthe bck towardth na Y I o.IO'tt t'distance I.had.i veie otmoritha 7uS Frm lnt Po. nte Jed the'ba10Te. 1. &touhdw r Wet' P. Pla.J.8r 8 r. nsle te te pe. aneCh&e .ot kcsWt' te muteso te oe et'rTh e'b ner. .nowlet aauuu bc tthe West Pint ga' A.the nv e.e .Ite downth fel4a ay m Wa 4eteted' btm- p erhold thenaVY s a' plt th b wbrougbJ .bck a'sv te. nsv.onthe ys' a rl1ne In. Jtd perate ettort"h A'l bys plce. theb1 Wet. 'Plnt'aIS yard lin Tey lqstn. bt. A 1 force'to kc Ain u'N v g b 'on AmY'1 le ced 1'bck2-d lIe the kked John fumbled A .pOUs w 'plgskn a. fh. .AttptDougfa W3.88ent lethatack atfubackfo AnapUs. Te hng h d bracfg efect Nav ven Wt flercenel a detetUo DlI-crd-the b v i fora tOudo Norc w o bd..rep1a.cd Bker..kce te. r I w. dotE. o andtfere could.e. blwent thuh .thec.lSls. 'e teApols br -eae.d tha.'t .Icoreh bn. u t r en- W Ubounded.Te .thrw th rcap8 taan U'could iruplnro'the Th.-d ceae teirfubln unU.th rult the conerce btweencaptn's ieterea umpl ann0nee ccusio .te ge "e gaeha .bce lourmt te befoe.t was\P. a' u. Su. uce. bu te f8t gathelnC 'c .m et.n TP lcet ate Cosely. 'rng th'excteettncdental't' .the NaY'itoucbowntlepreslc nt" hak pth e1e.rive n Je 't bf &I& l t-h St 'I th' Ay a a.nd .mpd pre'l. 4 nt Wln- tPIetan. e8t .er II1tsec LtH c' b l plceme alkedbrisk1tn and deoitraU a rded. prel- denfwrebe'er.'tb 1.1ed.ad'a te. thwllerul .ce 'w.l grte.J betwe.nthe.hew1 Je1n.h theNaystn.andwk ass .the..AT .std wr'-er h' sPnte Tbeprdent 1 i prn'l g&Ule' 'wth te' Ji r1 'e ceton' Ftb U e te'u. 'tus luUet cer m8 f duul n8h.thebxl theNaV 't .ch conUOU8 'a .b..i v eUgu h u e at se R Vt's dy.1 oa' 1 e erble one.F" mo stepp tom. th t uUlhe -e for h cPt W.Ce 1 .etuwW -OtblpttOr Ateth present tootb fel ret rne to. t c b 'louort& PcetonAteUc' .Ao 'wlerh rmned r'a t1ent .mute I dclk JrsenU nyentthlsPial t o- Ing t'tbecMT Uvethete.l1'd4 hn uW 1:18 i. .Wne'-t te t t atr 8oe. tth .1d uk 'teprt h Jeeyed .te' p d te dent.alt.ly'reple .a' r1t i JIe 'Wsyti p. 9 r Ce- -F PRIGF VE BASEBALL 2 me oro a embr w ai left o io th t V ss1p a i kind foflowthg.and an fotext feaa re d ell evera deldiii Bir- iet I ii J th St id Collins. aI re ai corn- pliet.btfore -9 o et sign d I Ob rem ha t th&th v ha than the.SouthAtlaiitlc .1 hl Blli -I. S S anotheryer. to come S S is. Bir- ozversnll kl d c t' las JHe Ho S Cotton8tates sfgnd he r an S as welL hij .the pl MemphIs.tbe -S the.Cdttpn Inibe .5. t wb L ajmond and S C1iIdsand. 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